Zitate von Clive Staples Lewis

Clive Staples Lewis Foto
7   0

Clive Staples Lewis

Geburtstag: 29. November 1898
Todesdatum: 24. November 1963
Andere Namen:C.S. Lewis

Werbung

C. S. Lewis war ein irischer Schriftsteller und Literaturwissenschaftler. Er lehrte am Magdalen College der University of Oxford und hatte den Lehrstuhl für Englische Literatur des Mittelalters und der Renaissance an der University of Cambridge inne. Er ist vor allem im angloamerikanischen Raum bekannt für seine Kinderbuchserie Die Chroniken von Narnia.

Ähnliche Autoren

Bram Stoker Foto
Bram Stoker11
Irischer Schriftsteller
Edmund Burke Foto
Edmund Burke9
Schriftsteller, Staatsphilosoph und Politiker
Oscar Wilde Foto
Oscar Wilde293
irischer Schriftsteller
Jonathan Swift Foto
Jonathan Swift10
englisch-irischer Schriftsteller und Satiriker
William Blake Foto
William Blake9
englischer Maler und Dichter
Isaac Bashevis Singer Foto
Isaac Bashevis Singer9
polnisch-US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller und Literaturno...
Thomas Kling1
deutscher Lyriker
Max von der Grün Foto
Max von der Grün4
deutscher Schriftsteller
Carl Zuckmayer Foto
Carl Zuckmayer7
deutscher Schriftsteller
Tanizaki Jun’ichirō Foto
Tanizaki Jun’ichirō6
japanischer Schriftsteller

Zitate Clive Staples Lewis

Werbung

„You can't get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis
As quoted in Of This and Other Worlds (1982) by Walter Hooper, Preface, p. 9

Werbung

„I do not think the forest would be so bright, nor the water so warm, nor love so sweet, if there were no danger in the lakes.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis
Context: And I say also this. I do not think the forest would be so bright, nor the water so warm, nor love so sweet, if there were no danger in the lakes. Hyoi, p. 76 <!-- 2003 edition -->

„God designed the human machine to run on Himself.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis
Context: God made us: invented us as a man invents an engine. A car is made to run on petrol, and it would not run properly on anything else. Now God designed the human machine to run on Himself. Book II, Chapter 3, "The Shocking Alternative"

„I do not contradict him. But I reject slavery because I see no men fit to be masters.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis
Context: I don't deserve a share in governing a hen-roost, much less a nation. Nor do most people — all the people who believe advertisements, and think in catchwords and spread rumors. The real reason for democracy is just the reverse. Mankind is so fallen that no man can be trusted with unchecked power over his fellows. Aristotle said that some people were only fit to be slaves. I do not contradict him. But I reject slavery because I see no men fit to be masters.

„There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, "Thy will be done," and those to whom God says, in the end, "Thy will be done."“

—  Clive Staples Lewis
Context: 'But what of the poor Ghosts who never get into the omnibus at all?' 'Everyone who wishes it does. Never fear. There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, "Thy will be done," and those to whom God says, in the end, "Thy will be done." All that are in Hell, choose it. Without that self-choice there could be no Hell. No soul that seriously and constantly desires joy will ever miss it. Those who seek find. To those who knock it is opened.' Ch. 9, p. 72; part of this has also been rendered in a variant form, and quoted as:

Werbung

„It foretells a sudden, violent end imposed from without; an extinguisher popped onto the candle, a brick flung at the gramophone, a curtain rung down on the play — "Halt!"“

—  Clive Staples Lewis
Context: Christian Apocalyptic offers us no such hope. It does not even foretell, (which would be more tolerable to our habits of thought) a gradual decay. It foretells a sudden, violent end imposed from without; an extinguisher popped onto the candle, a brick flung at the gramophone, a curtain rung down on the play — "Halt!"

„The doctrine of the Second Coming teaches us that we do not and cannot know when the world drama will end.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis
Context: The doctrine of the Second Coming teaches us that we do not and cannot know when the world drama will end. The curtain may be rung down at any moment: say, before you have finished reading this paragraph.

„And now, by a transition which he did not notice, it seemed that what had begun as speech was turned into sight, or into something that can be remembered only as if it were seeing. He thought he saw the Great Dance.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis
Context: And now, by a transition which he did not notice, it seemed that what had begun as speech was turned into sight, or into something that can be remembered only as if it were seeing. He thought he saw the Great Dance. It seemed to be woven out of the intertwining undulation of many cords or bands of light, leaping over and under one another and mutually embraced in arabesques and flower-like subtleties. Each figure as he looked at it became the master-figure or focus of the whole spectacle, by means of which his eye disentangled all else and brought it into unity — only to be itself entangled when he looked to what he had taken for mere marginal decorations and found that there also the same hegemony was claimed, and the claim made good, yet the former pattern thereby disposed but finding in its new subordination a significance greater than that which it had abdicated. He could see also (but the word "seeing" is now plainly inadequate) wherever the ribbons or serpents of light intersected minute corpuscles of momentary brightness: and he knew somehow that these particles were the secular generalities of which history tells — people, institutions, climates of opinion, civilizations, arts, sciences and the like — ephemeral coruscations that piped their short song and vanished. The ribbons or cords themselves, in which millions of corpuscles lived and died, were the things of some different kind. At first he could not say what. But he knew in the end that most of them were individual entities. If so, the time in which the Great Dance proceeds is very unlike time as we know it. Some of the thinner more delicate cords were the beings that we call short lived: flowers and insects, a fruit or a storm of rain, and once (he thought) a wave of the sea. Others were such things we think lasting: crystals, rivers, mountains, or even stars. Far above these in girth and luminosity and flashing with colours form beyond our spectrum were the lines of personal beings, yet as different from one another in splendour as all of them from the previous class. But not all the cords were individuals: some of them were universal truths or universal qualities. It did not surprise him then to find that these and the persons were both cords and both stood together as against the mere atoms of generality which lived and died in the clashing of their streams: But afterwards, when he came back to earth, he wondered. And by now the thing must have passed together out of the region of sight as we understand it. For he says that the whole figure of these enamored and inter-inanimate circlings was suddenly revealed as the mere superficies of a far vaster pattern in four dimensions, and that figure as the boundary of yet others in other worlds: till suddenly as the movement grew yet swifter, the interweaving yet more ecstatic, the relevance of all to all yet more intense, as dimension was added to dimension and that part of him which could reason and remember was dropped further and further behind that part of him which saw, even then, at the very zenith of complexity, complexity was eaten up and faded, as a thin white cloud fades into the hard blue burning of sky, and all simplicity beyond all comprehension, ancient and young as spring, illimitable, pellucid, drew him with cords of infinite desire into its own stillness. He went up into such a quietness, a privacy, and a freshness that at the very moment when he stood farthest from our ordinary mode of being he had the sense of stripping off encumbrances and awaking from a trance, and coming to himself. With a gesture of relaxation he looked about him…

„It would be even worse to think of those who get what they pray for as a sort of court favorites, people who have influence with the throne. The refused prayer of Christ in Gethsemane is answer enough to that.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis
Context: Prayer is not a machine. It is not magic. It is not advice offered to God. Our act, when we pray, must not, any more than all our other acts, be separated from the continuous act of God Himself, in which alone all finite causes operate. It would be even worse to think of those who get what they pray for as a sort of court favorites, people who have influence with the throne. The refused prayer of Christ in Gethsemane is answer enough to that. And I dare not leave out the hard saying which I once heard from an experienced Christian: “I have seen many striking answers to prayer and more than one that I thought miraculous. But they usually come at the beginning: before conversion, or soon after it. As the Christian life proceeds, they tend to be rarer. The refusals, too, are not only more frequent; they become more unmistakable, more emphatic.” Does God then forsake just those who serve Him best? Well, He who served Him best of all said, near His tortured death, “Why hast thou forsaken me?” When God becomes man, that Man, of all others, is least comforted by God, at His greatest need. There is a mystery here which, even if I had the power, I might not have the courage to explore. Meanwhile, little people like you and me, if our prayers are sometimes granted, beyond all hope and probability, had better not draw hasty conclusions to our own advantage. If we were stronger, we might be less tenderly treated. If we were braver, we might be sent, with far less help, to defend far more desperate posts in the great battle.

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Translate quotes
Folgend
Die heutige Jubiläen
Gustav Heinemann Foto
Gustav Heinemann6
ehemaliger Bundespräsident der Bundesrepublik Deutschland 1899 - 1976
Götz George Foto
Götz George3
deutscher Schauspieler 1938
Götz von Berlichingen Foto
Götz von Berlichingen1
fränkischer Reichsritter 1480 - 1562
Ariano Suassuna Foto
Ariano Suassuna
brasilianischer Schriftsteller 1927 - 2014
Weitere 67 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Bram Stoker Foto
Bram Stoker11
Irischer Schriftsteller
Edmund Burke Foto
Edmund Burke9
Schriftsteller, Staatsphilosoph und Politiker
Oscar Wilde Foto
Oscar Wilde293
irischer Schriftsteller
Jonathan Swift Foto
Jonathan Swift10
englisch-irischer Schriftsteller und Satiriker
William Blake Foto
William Blake9
englischer Maler und Dichter