Zitate von Albert Camus

Albert Camus Foto
8  0

Albert Camus

Geburtstag: 7. November 1913
Todesdatum: 4. Januar 1960

Werbung

Albert Camus [alˈbɛːʀ kaˈmy] war ein französischer Schriftsteller und Philosoph. 1957 erhielt er für sein publizistisches Gesamtwerk den Nobelpreis für Literatur. Camus gilt als einer der bekanntesten und bedeutendsten französischen Autoren des 20. Jahrhunderts.

Ähnliche Autoren

Michel Foucault Foto
Michel Foucault7
französischer Philosoph
Jean Paul Sartre Foto
Jean Paul Sartre11
französischer Romancier, Dramatiker, Philosoph und Publizist
Henry David Thoreau Foto
Henry David Thoreau53
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller und Philosoph (1817-1862)
 Novalis Foto
Novalis86
deutscher Dichter der Frühromantik
François Lelord Foto
François Lelord7
französischer Psychiater und Schriftsteller
Claude Adrien Helvétius Foto
Claude Adrien Helvétius5
französischer Philosoph
Anatole France Foto
Anatole France8
französischer Schriftsteller
Johann Kaspar Lavater Foto
Johann Kaspar Lavater2
Schweizer Pfarrer, Philosoph und Schriftsteller
Denis Diderot Foto
Denis Diderot7
Französischer Schriftsteller und Philosoph des 18. Jahrhu...
Michel Houellebecq Foto
Michel Houellebecq11
französischer Schriftsteller

Zitate Albert Camus

„[... ] die Freiheit besteht in erster Linie nicht aus Privilegien, sondern aus Pflichten.“

— Albert Camus
Brot und Freiheit. Ansprache vom 10. Mai 1953 an der Arbeitsbörse von St-Etienne. In: Fragen der Zeit. Deutsch von Guido G. Meister. Rowohlt Verlag 1960. S. 100

Werbung

„Die wahre Großzügigkeit gegenüber der Zukunft besteht darin, alles der Gegenwart zu geben.“

— Albert Camus
Der Mensch in der Revolte, zitiert in Morvan Lebesque: Albert Camus in Selbstzeugnisse und Bilddokumenten. Deutsch von Guido G. Meister. Rowohlts Monographien 1960. S. 109

„Von einem bestimmten Alter an ist jeder Mensch für sein Gesicht verantwortlich.“

— Albert Camus
Der Fall. Deutsch von Guido G. Meister. © Rowohlt Verlag 1957. Bibliothek Suhrkamp 1965. S. 55

„Ein Mensch ist immer das Opfer seiner Wahrheiten.“

— Albert Camus
Der Mythos von Sisyphos. Deutsch von Hans Georg Brenner und Wolfdietrich Rasch. Karl Rauch Verlag Düsseldorf. 68. Tausend 1960. S. 46

„Sie wissen ja, was Charme ist: eine Art, ein Ja zur Antwort zu erhalten, ohne eine klare Frage gestellt zu haben.“

— Albert Camus
Der Fall. Deutsch von Guido G. Meister. © Rowohlt Verlag 1957. Bibliothek Suhrkamp 1965. S. 55

„Der Kampf gegen Gipfel vermag ein Menschenherz auszufüllen. Wir müssen uns Sisyphos als einen glücklichen Menschen vorstellen.“

— Albert Camus
Der Mythos des Sisyphos, Übersetzt von Vincent von Wroblewsky, Rowohlt Taschenbuch Verlag, 12. Auflage, Hamburg, 2010, ISBN 978-3-499-22765-3, S. 160

Werbung

„As if the blind rage had washed me clean, rid me of hope; for the first time, in that night alive with signs and stars, I opened myself to the gentle indifference of the world.“

— Albert Camus
Context: For the first time in a long time I thought about Maman. I felt as if I understood why at the end of her life she had taken a 'fiancé,' why she had played at beginning again. Even there, in that home where lives were fading out, evening was a kind of wistful respite. So close to death, Maman must have felt free then and ready to live it all again. Nobody, nobody had the right to cry over her. And I felt ready to live it all again too. As if the blind rage had washed me clean, rid me of hope; for the first time, in that night alive with signs and stars, I opened myself to the gentle indifference of the world. Finding it so much like myself — so like a brother, really — I felt I had been happy and that I was happy again. For everything to be consummated, for me to feel less alone, I had only to wish that there be a large crowd of spectators the day of my execution and that they greet me with cries of hate. Variant translation: I, too, felt ready to start life all over again. It was as if that great rush of anger had washed me clean, emptied me of hope, and, gazing up at the dark sky spangled with its signs and stars, for the first time, the first, I laid my heart open to the benign indifference of the universe. To feel it so like myself, indeed, so brotherly, made me realize that I’d been happy, and that I was happy still. For all to be accomplished, for me to feel less lonely, all that remained to hope was that on the day of my execution there should be a huge crowd of spectators and that they should greet me with howls of execration. As translated by Stuart Gilbert

„Everybody was privileged. There were only privileged people.“

— Albert Camus
Context: I don't know why, but something inside me snapped. I started yelling at the top of my lungs, and I insulted him and told him not to waste his prayers on me. I grabbed him by the collar of his cassock. I was pouring out on him everything that was in my heart, cries of anger and cries of joy. He seemed so certain about everything, didn't he? And yet none of his certainties was worth one hair of a woman's head. He wasn't even sure he was alive, because he was living like a dead man. Whereas it looked as if I was the one who'd come up emptyhanded. But I was sure about me, about everything, surer than he could ever be, sure of my life and sure of the death I had waiting for me. Yes, that was all I had. But at least I had as much of a hold on it as it had on me. I had been right, I was still right, I was always right. I had lived my life one way and I could just as well have lived it another. I had done this and I hadn't done that. I hadn't done this thing but I had done another. And so? It was as if I had waited all this time for this moment and for the first light of this dawn to be vindicated. Nothing, nothing mattered, and I knew why. So did he. Throughout the whole absurd life I'd lived, a dark wind had been rising toward me from somewhere deep in my future, across years that were still to come, and as it passed, this wind leveled whatever was offered to me at the time, in years no more real than the ones I was living. What did other people's deaths or a mother's love matter to me; what did his God or the lives people choose or the fate they think they elect matter to me when we're all elected by the same fate, me and billions of privileged people like him who also called themselves my brothers? Couldn't he see, couldn't he see that? Everybody was privileged. There were only privileged people. The others would all be condemned one day. And he would be condemned, too. <!-- translated by Matthew Ward

„One might think that a period which, in a space of fifty years, uproots, enslaves, or kills seventy million human beings should be condemned out of hand. But its culpability must still be understood...“

— Albert Camus
Context: One might think that a period which, in a space of fifty years, uproots, enslaves, or kills seventy million human beings should be condemned out of hand. But its culpability must still be understood... In more ingenuous times, when the tyrant razed cities for his own greater glory, when the slave chained to the conqueror's chariot was dragged through the rejoicing streets, when enemies were thrown to the wild beasts in front of the assembled people, the mind did not reel before such unabashed crimes, and the judgment remained unclouded. But slave camps under the flag of freedom, massacres justified by philanthropy or by a taste for the superhuman, in one sense cripple judgment. On the day when crime dons the apparel of innocence — through a curious transposition peculiar to our times — it is innocence that is called upon to justify itself.

„Time will prolong time, and life will serve life.“

— Albert Camus
Context: Time will prolong time, and life will serve life. In this field that is both limited and bulging with possibilities, everything to himself, except his lucidity, seems unforeseeable to him. What rule, then, could emanate from that unreasonable order? The only truth that might seem instructive to him is not formal: it comes to life and unfolds in men. The absurd mind cannot so much expect ethical rules at the end of its reasoning as, rather, illustrations and the breath of human lives.

Werbung

„Great feelings take with them their own universe, splendid or abject.“

— Albert Camus
Context: Great feelings take with them their own universe, splendid or abject. They light up with their passion an exclusive world in which they recognize their climate. There is a universe of jealousy, of ambition, of selfishness or generosity. A universe — in other words a metaphysic and an attitude of mind.

„The world is what it is, which is to say, nothing much. This is what everyone learned yesterday, thanks to the formidable concert of opinion coming from radios, newspapers, and information agencies.“

— Albert Camus
Context: The world is what it is, which is to say, nothing much. This is what everyone learned yesterday, thanks to the formidable concert of opinion coming from radios, newspapers, and information agencies. Indeed we are told, in the midst of hundreds of enthusiastic commentaries, that any average city can be wiped out by a bomb the size of a football. American, English, and French newspapers are filled with eloquent essays on the future, the past, the inventors, the cost, the peaceful incentives, the military advantages, and even the life-of-its-own character of the atom bomb. We can sum it up in one sentence: Our technical civilization has just reached its greatest level of savagery. We will have to choose, in the more or less near future, between collective suicide and the intelligent use of our scientific conquests. Meanwhile we think there is something indecent in celebrating a discovery whose use has caused the most formidable rage of destruction ever known to man. What will it bring to a world already given over to all the convulsions of violence, incapable of any control, indifferent to justice and the simple happiness of men — a world where science devotes itself to organized murder? No one but the most unrelenting idealists would dare to wonder.

„Myths are made for the imagination to breathe life into them.“

— Albert Camus
Context: You have already grasped that Sisyphus is the absurd hero. He is, as much through his passions as through his torture. His scorn of the gods, his hatred of death, and his passion for life won him that unspeakable penalty in which the whole being is exerted toward accomplishing nothing. This is the price that must be paid for the passions of this earth. Nothing is told us about Sisyphus in the underworld. Myths are made for the imagination to breathe life into them.

„I want to know whether I can live with what I know and with that alone.“

— Albert Camus
Context: I do not want to found anything on the incomprehensible. I want to know whether I can live with what I know and with that alone. <!-- 170

Nächster
Die heutige Jubiläen
Erich Kästner Foto
Erich Kästner32
deutscher Schriftsteller 1899 - 1974
Paul Tibbets Foto
Paul Tibbets4
US-amerikanischer Pilot und Soldat 1915 - 2007
Frederick Busch
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller 1941 - 2006
Helmut Schön Foto
Helmut Schön2
deutscher Fußballspieler 1915 - 1996
Weitere 59 heute Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Michel Foucault Foto
Michel Foucault7
französischer Philosoph
Jean Paul Sartre Foto
Jean Paul Sartre11
französischer Romancier, Dramatiker, Philosoph und Publizist
Henry David Thoreau Foto
Henry David Thoreau53
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller und Philosoph (1817-1862)
 Novalis Foto
Novalis86
deutscher Dichter der Frühromantik
François Lelord Foto
François Lelord7
französischer Psychiater und Schriftsteller