Zitate von Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin Foto
13   0

Benjamin Franklin

Geburtstag: 17. Januar 1706
Todesdatum: 17. April 1790

Werbung

Benjamin Franklin war ein amerikanischer Drucker, Verleger, Schriftsteller, Naturwissenschaftler, Erfinder und Staatsmann.

Als einer der Gründerväter der Vereinigten Staaten beteiligte er sich am Entwurf der Unabhängigkeitserklärung der Vereinigten Staaten und war einer ihrer Unterzeichner. Während der Amerikanischen Revolution vertrat er die Vereinigten Staaten als Diplomat in Frankreich und handelte sowohl den Allianzvertrag mit den Franzosen als auch den Frieden von Paris aus, der den Amerikanischen Unabhängigkeitskrieg beendete. Als Delegierter der Philadelphia Convention beteiligte er sich an der Ausarbeitung der amerikanischen Verfassung.

Franklins Leben war in hohem Maße von dem Willen geprägt, das Gemeinwesen zu fördern. Er gründete die ersten Freiwilligen Feuerwehren in Philadelphia sowie die erste Leihbibliothek Amerikas und konstruierte einen besonders effektiven und raucharmen Holzofen. Auch machte er wissenschaftliche Entdeckungen, er erfand unter anderem den Blitzableiter.

Geboren als Sohn eines Seifen- und Kerzenmachers, machte Franklin zunächst eine Karriere als Drucker, bevor er sich im Alter von 42 Jahren aus dem Geschäftsleben zurückzog und in die Politik ging. Sein sozialer Aufstieg galt – befördert durch seine in zahlreichen Auflagen gedruckte Autobiographie – über lange Zeit hinweg als ein Musterbeispiel dafür, wie man sich aus eigener Kraft und Disziplin emporarbeiten kann.

Ähnliche Autoren

Georg Büchner Foto
Georg Büchner67
Deutscher Schriftsteller, Naturwissenschaftler und Revolu...
Phillip Stanphone Chesterfield Foto
Phillip Stanphone Chesterfield11
britischer Diplomat
Peter Drucker Foto
Peter Drucker47
US-amerikanischer Ökonom österreichischer Herkunft
George Catlett Marshall Foto
George Catlett Marshall2
amerikanischer General of the Army und Staatsmann
Nikola Tesla Foto
Nikola Tesla33
Erfinder und Physiker
René Descartes Foto
René Descartes8
französischer Philosoph, Mathematiker und Naturwissenscha...
John Muir Foto
John Muir3
schottisch-US-amerikanischer Universalgelehrter
Ho Chi Minh Foto
Ho Chi Minh1
vietnamesischer Revolutionär und Staatsmann
Gaius Julius Caesar Foto
Gaius Julius Caesar24
römischer Staatsmann, Feldherr und Autor
Winston Churchill Foto
Winston Churchill16
britischer Staatsmann des 20. Jahrhunderts

Zitate Benjamin Franklin

Werbung
Werbung

„Zeit ist Geld.“

—  Benjamin Franklin
Advice to a Young Tradesman, 21. Juli 1748

Werbung

„I would advise you therefore not to attempt unchaining the Tyger, but to burn this Piece before it is seen by any other Person“

—  Benjamin Franklin
Context: I have read your Manuscript with some Attention. By the Arguments it contains against the Doctrine of a particular Providence, tho’ you allow a general Providence, you strike at the Foundation of all Religion: For without the Belief of a Providence that takes Cognizance of, guards and guides and may favour particular Persons, there is no Motive to Worship a Deity, to fear its Displeasure, or to pray for its Protection. I will not enter into any Discussion of your Principles, tho’ you seem to desire it; At present I shall only give you my Opinion that tho’ your Reasonings are subtle, and may prevail with some Readers, you will not succeed so as to change the general Sentiments of Mankind on that Subject, and the Consequence of printing this Piece will be a great deal of Odium drawn upon your self, Mischief to you and no Benefit to others. He that spits against the Wind, spits in his own Face. But were you to succeed, do you imagine any Good would be done by it? You yourself may find it easy to live a virtuous Life without the Assistance afforded by Religion; you having a clear Perception of the Advantages of Virtue and the Disadvantages of Vice, and possessing a Strength of Resolution sufficient to enable you to resist common Temptations. But think how great a Proportion of Mankind consists of weak and ignorant Men and Women, and of inexperienc’d and inconsiderate Youth of both Sexes, who have need of the Motives of Religion to restrain them from Vice, to support their Virtue, and retain them in the Practice of it till it becomes habitual, which is the great Point for its Security; And perhaps you are indebted to her originally that is to your Religious Education, for the Habits of Virtue upon which you now justly value yourself. You might easily display your excellent Talents of reasoning on a less hazardous Subject, and thereby obtain Rank with our most distinguish’d Authors. For among us, it is not necessary, as among the Hottentots that a Youth to be receiv’d into the Company of Men, should prove his Manhood by beating his Mother. I would advise you therefore not to attempt unchaining the Tyger, but to burn this Piece before it is seen by any other Person, whereby you will save yourself a great deal of Mortification from the Enemies it may raise against you, and perhaps a good deal of Regret and Repentance. If Men are so wicked as we now see them with Religion what would they be if without it? Letter to unknown recipient (13 December 1757) http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=473. The letter was published as early as 1817 (William Temple Franklin, The Works of Benjamin Franklin, volume VI, pp. 243-244). In 1833 William Wisner ("Don't Unchain the Tiger," American Tract Society, 1833) identified the recipient as probably Thomas Paine, which was echoed by Jared Sparks in his 1840 edition of Franklin's works (volume x, p. 281). (Presumably it would have been directed against The Age of Reason, his deistic work which criticized orthodox Christianity.) Calvin Blanchard responded to Wisner's tract in The Life of Thomas Paine (1860), pp. 73-74, by noting that Franklin died in 1790, while Paine did not begin writing The Age of Reason until 1793, and incorrectly concluded that the letter did not exist. Paul F. Boller, Jr., and John George, included it in They Never Said It: A Book of Fake Quotes, Misquotes, & Misleading Attributions (1989), on p. 28. Moncure Daniel Conway pointed out (The Life of Thomas Paine, 1892, vol I, p. vii) that the recipient could not be Thomas Paine, in that he, unlike Paine, denied a "particular providence". The intended recipient remains unidentified. Parts of the above have also been rearranged and paraphrased: I would advise you not to attempt Unchaining The Tiger, but to burn this piece before it is seen by any other person. If men are so wicked with religion, what would they be if without it? If men are so wicked with religion, what would they be Without it? Think how many inconsiderate and inexperienced youth of both sexes there are, who have need of the motives of religion to restrain them from vice, to support their virtue, and retain them in the practice of it till it becomes habitual.

„If Men are so wicked as we now see them with Religion what would they be if without it?“

—  Benjamin Franklin
Context: I have read your Manuscript with some Attention. By the Arguments it contains against the Doctrine of a particular Providence, tho’ you allow a general Providence, you strike at the Foundation of all Religion: For without the Belief of a Providence that takes Cognizance of, guards and guides and may favour particular Persons, there is no Motive to Worship a Deity, to fear its Displeasure, or to pray for its Protection. I will not enter into any Discussion of your Principles, tho’ you seem to desire it; At present I shall only give you my Opinion that tho’ your Reasonings are subtle, and may prevail with some Readers, you will not succeed so as to change the general Sentiments of Mankind on that Subject, and the Consequence of printing this Piece will be a great deal of Odium drawn upon your self, Mischief to you and no Benefit to others. He that spits against the Wind, spits in his own Face. But were you to succeed, do you imagine any Good would be done by it? You yourself may find it easy to live a virtuous Life without the Assistance afforded by Religion; you having a clear Perception of the Advantages of Virtue and the Disadvantages of Vice, and possessing a Strength of Resolution sufficient to enable you to resist common Temptations. But think how great a Proportion of Mankind consists of weak and ignorant Men and Women, and of inexperienc’d and inconsiderate Youth of both Sexes, who have need of the Motives of Religion to restrain them from Vice, to support their Virtue, and retain them in the Practice of it till it becomes habitual, which is the great Point for its Security; And perhaps you are indebted to her originally that is to your Religious Education, for the Habits of Virtue upon which you now justly value yourself. You might easily display your excellent Talents of reasoning on a less hazardous Subject, and thereby obtain Rank with our most distinguish’d Authors. For among us, it is not necessary, as among the Hottentots that a Youth to be receiv’d into the Company of Men, should prove his Manhood by beating his Mother. I would advise you therefore not to attempt unchaining the Tyger, but to burn this Piece before it is seen by any other Person, whereby you will save yourself a great deal of Mortification from the Enemies it may raise against you, and perhaps a good deal of Regret and Repentance. If Men are so wicked as we now see them with Religion what would they be if without it? Letter to unknown recipient (13 December 1757) http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=473. The letter was published as early as 1817 (William Temple Franklin, The Works of Benjamin Franklin, volume VI, pp. 243-244). In 1833 William Wisner ("Don't Unchain the Tiger," American Tract Society, 1833) identified the recipient as probably Thomas Paine, which was echoed by Jared Sparks in his 1840 edition of Franklin's works (volume x, p. 281). (Presumably it would have been directed against The Age of Reason, his deistic work which criticized orthodox Christianity.) Calvin Blanchard responded to Wisner's tract in The Life of Thomas Paine (1860), pp. 73-74, by noting that Franklin died in 1790, while Paine did not begin writing The Age of Reason until 1793, and incorrectly concluded that the letter did not exist. Paul F. Boller, Jr., and John George, included it in They Never Said It: A Book of Fake Quotes, Misquotes, & Misleading Attributions (1989), on p. 28. Moncure Daniel Conway pointed out (The Life of Thomas Paine, 1892, vol I, p. vii) that the recipient could not be Thomas Paine, in that he, unlike Paine, denied a "particular providence". The intended recipient remains unidentified. Parts of the above have also been rearranged and paraphrased: I would advise you not to attempt Unchaining The Tiger, but to burn this piece before it is seen by any other person. If men are so wicked with religion, what would they be if without it? If men are so wicked with religion, what would they be Without it? Think how many inconsiderate and inexperienced youth of both sexes there are, who have need of the motives of religion to restrain them from vice, to support their virtue, and retain them in the practice of it till it becomes habitual.

„Idleness and Pride Tax with a heavier Hand than Kings and Parliaments;“

—  Benjamin Franklin
Context: Idleness and Pride Tax with a heavier Hand than Kings and Parliaments; If we can get rid of the former we may easily bear the Latter. Letter to Charles Thomson, 11 July 1765; also quoted in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919). The last sentence is sometimes misquoted as "If we can get rid of the former, we can get rid of the latter".

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Translate quotes
Folgend
Die heutige Jubiläen
Nelson Rodrigues Foto
Nelson Rodrigues
brasilianischer Schriftsteller, Dramatiker, Journalist un... 1912 - 1980
Georges Cuvier Foto
Georges Cuvier1
französischer Naturforscher, Begründer der wissenschaftli... 1769 - 1832
Abu Bakr Foto
Abu Bakr1
erster der vier rechtgeleiteten Kalifen, der Nachfolger... 573 - 634
Irina Tweedie
Sufi-Lehrerin der Naqschbandiyya-Mudschaddidiyya-Sufi-Linie 1907 - 1999
Weitere 61 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Georg Büchner Foto
Georg Büchner67
Deutscher Schriftsteller, Naturwissenschaftler und Revolu...
Phillip Stanphone Chesterfield Foto
Phillip Stanphone Chesterfield11
britischer Diplomat
Peter Drucker Foto
Peter Drucker47
US-amerikanischer Ökonom österreichischer Herkunft
George Catlett Marshall Foto
George Catlett Marshall2
amerikanischer General of the Army und Staatsmann
Nikola Tesla Foto
Nikola Tesla33
Erfinder und Physiker