Zitate von Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin Foto
12  0

Benjamin Franklin

Geburtstag: 17. Januar 1706
Todesdatum: 17. April 1790

Werbung

Benjamin Franklin war ein amerikanischer Drucker, Verleger, Schriftsteller, Naturwissenschaftler, Erfinder und Staatsmann.

Als einer der Gründerväter der Vereinigten Staaten beteiligte er sich am Entwurf der Unabhängigkeitserklärung der Vereinigten Staaten und war einer ihrer Unterzeichner. Während der Amerikanischen Revolution vertrat er die Vereinigten Staaten als Diplomat in Frankreich und handelte sowohl den Allianzvertrag mit den Franzosen als auch den Frieden von Paris aus, der den Amerikanischen Unabhängigkeitskrieg beendete. Als Delegierter der Philadelphia Convention beteiligte er sich an der Ausarbeitung der amerikanischen Verfassung.

Franklins Leben war in hohem Maße von dem Willen geprägt, das Gemeinwesen zu fördern. Er gründete die ersten Freiwilligen Feuerwehren in Philadelphia sowie die erste Leihbibliothek Amerikas und konstruierte einen besonders effektiven und raucharmen Holzofen. Auch machte er wissenschaftliche Entdeckungen, er erfand unter anderem den Blitzableiter.

Geboren als Sohn eines Seifen- und Kerzenmachers, machte Franklin zunächst eine Karriere als Drucker, bevor er sich im Alter von 42 Jahren aus dem Geschäftsleben zurückzog und in die Politik ging. Sein sozialer Aufstieg galt – befördert durch seine in zahlreichen Auflagen gedruckte Autobiographie – über lange Zeit hinweg als ein Musterbeispiel dafür, wie man sich aus eigener Kraft und Disziplin emporarbeiten kann.

Zitate Benjamin Franklin

Werbung
Werbung

„Zeit ist Geld.“

— Benjamin Franklin
Advice to a Young Tradesman, 21. Juli 1748

Werbung

„In short, you offered a premium for the encouragement of idleness, and you should not now wonder that it has had its effect in the increase of poverty“

— Benjamin Franklin
Context: I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I travelled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer. There is no country in the world where so many provisions are established for them; so many hospitals to receive them when they are sick or lame, founded and maintained by voluntary charities; so many alms-houses for the aged of both sexes, together with a solemn general law made by the rich to subject their estates to a heavy tax for the support of the poor. Under all these obligations, are our poor modest, humble, and thankful; and do they use their best endeavours to maintain themselves, and lighten our shoulders of this burthen? On the contrary, I affirm that there is no country in the world in which the poor are more idle, dissolute, drunken, and insolent. The day you passed that act, you took away from before their eyes the greatest of all inducements to industry, frugality, and sobriety, by giving them a dependence on somewhat else than a careful accumulation during youth and health, for support in age or sickness. In short, you offered a premium for the encouragement of idleness, and you should not now wonder that it has had its effect in the increase of poverty. [http://founding.com/founders-library/american-political-figures/benjamin-franklin/on-the-price-of-corn-and-management-of-the-poor/ On the Price of Corn and Management of the Poor] (29 November 1766).

„Most People dislike Vanity in others whatever Share they have of it themselves“

— Benjamin Franklin
Context: Indeed I scarce ever heard or saw the introductory Words, Without Vanity I may say, etc. but some vain thing immediately follow'd. Most People dislike Vanity in others whatever Share they have of it themselves, but I give it fair Quarter wherever I meet with it, being persuaded that it is often productive of Good to the Possessor and to others that are within his Sphere of Action: And therefore in many Cases it would not be quite absurd if a Man were to thank God for his Vanity among the other Comforts of Life. Part I, p. 2.

„Slavery is such an atrocious debasement of human nature, that its very extirpation, if not performed with solicitious care, may sometimes open a source of serious evils.“

— Benjamin Franklin
Context: Slavery is such an atrocious debasement of human nature, that its very extirpation, if not performed with solicitious care, may sometimes open a source of serious evils. The unhappy man who has been treated as a brute animal, too frequently sinks beneath the common standard of the human species. The galling chains, that bind his body, do also fetter his intellectual faculties, and impair the social affections of his heart… To instruct, to advise, to qualify those, who have been restored to freedom, for the exercise and enjoyment of civil liberty… and to procure for their children an education calculated for their future situation in life; these are the great outlines of the annexed plan, which we have adopted. For the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery (1789). As quoted in [http://www.amazon.com/Franklin-Writings-Library-America-Benjamin/dp/0940450291 Writings] (1987), p. 1154-1155.

„I think all the heretics I have known have been virtuous men.“

— Benjamin Franklin
Context: Remember me affectionately to good Dr. Price and to the honest heretic Dr. Priestly. I do not call him honest by way of distinction; for I think all the heretics I have known have been virtuous men. They have the virtue of fortitude or they would not venture to own their heresy; and they cannot afford to be deficient in any of the other virtues, as that would give advantage to their many enemies; and they have not like orthodox sinners, such a number of friends to excuse or justify them. Do not, however, mistake me. It is not to my good friend's heresy that I impute his honesty. On the contrary, 'tis his honesty that has brought upon him the character of heretic. [http://www.2think.org/priestly.shtml Letter to Benjamin Vaughan] (24 October 1788).

Nächster
Die heutige Jubiläen
Simone van der Vlugt Foto
Simone van der Vlugt
niederländische Autorin 1966
Kurt Weidemann5
deutscher Grafikdesigner, Typograf, Autor und Lehrer 1922 - 2011
Max René Hesse1
deutscher Arzt und Schriftsteller 1885 - 1952
Licio Gelli Foto
Licio Gelli
italienischer Faschist, Verschwörer und Freimaurer, Gründ... 1919 - 2015
Weitere 67 heute Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Georg Büchner Foto
Georg Büchner68
Deutscher Schriftsteller, Naturwissenschaftler und Revolu...
Phillip Stanphone Chesterfield Foto
Phillip Stanphone Chesterfield11
britischer Diplomat
George Catlett Marshall Foto
George Catlett Marshall2
amerikanischer General of the Army und Staatsmann
Nikola Tesla Foto
Nikola Tesla1
Erfinder und Physiker
Ho Chi Minh Foto
Ho Chi Minh1
vietnamesischer Revolutionär und Staatsmann
Gaius Julius Caesar Foto
Gaius Julius Caesar6
römischer Staatsmann, Feldherr und Autor
Heinz Guderian Foto
Heinz Guderian2
deutscher Offizier und Generaloberst im Zweiten Weltkrieg
Tom DeMarco3
US-amerikanischer Autor
Isaac Bashevis Singer Foto
Isaac Bashevis Singer8
polnisch-US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller und Literaturno...
Henry David Thoreau Foto
Henry David Thoreau53
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller und Philosoph (1817-1862)