Zitate von Miguel de Cervantes

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Miguel de Cervantes

Geburtstag: 29. September 1547
Todesdatum: 23. April 1616
Andere Namen:Miguel de Cervantes y Saavedra,Saavedra Miguel De Cervantes

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Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra [miˈɣel ðe θeɾˈβantes sa.aˈβeðɾa] war ein spanischer Schriftsteller. Der Autor des Don Quijote gilt als Spaniens Nationaldichter.

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Zitate Miguel de Cervantes

„Der berühmte Don Quijote von la Mancha, der sich mit einem anderen Namen nennt der Ritter von der traurigen Gestalt.“

— Miguel de Cervantes
Verlag von A. Hofmann & Comp., 3. verbesserte Auflage, Berlin 1852, Übersetzung: Ludwig Tieck (1773-1853), 1. Teil, 19. Kap., S.154.

„Das beste Gewürz von der Welt ist der Hunger; und da dieser den Armen nicht fehlt, so macht diesen das Essen immer Vergnügen.“

— Miguel de Cervantes
Verlag von A. Hofmann & Comp., 3. verbesserte Auflage, Berlin 1853, Übersetzung: Ludwig Tieck (1773-1853), 2. Teil, 5. Kap., S.40.

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„Wer viel liest und viel reist, sieht vieles und erfährt vieles.“

— Miguel de Cervantes
Verlag Artemis & Winkler, 4. Auflage, Düsseldorf und Zürich 2005, Übersetzung: Ludwig Braunfels (1810-1885), ISBN 3-538-06892-5, 2. Teil, 25. Kap., S. 741.

„Die Narrheit hat gewiss mehr Genossen und Schmarotzer als die Gescheitheit.“

— Miguel de Cervantes
Verlag Artemis & Winkler, 4. Auflage, Düsseldorf und Zürich 2005, Übersetzung: Ludwig Braunfels (1810-1885), ISBN 3-538-06892-5, 2. Teil, 13. Kap., S. 637.

„Die Freiheit, Sancho, ist eine der köstlichsten Gaben, die der Himmel dem Menschen verliehen; mit ihr können sich nicht die Schätze vergleichen, welche die Erde in sich schließt noch die das Meer bedeckt.“

— Miguel de Cervantes
Verlag Artemis & Winkler, 4. Auflage, Düsseldorf und Zürich 2005, Übersetzung: Ludwig Braunfels (1810-1885), ISBN 3-538-06892-5, 2. Teil, 58. Kap., S. 984.

„I was ever charitable and good to the poor, and scorn to take the bread out of another man's mouth. On the other side, by our Lady, they shall play me no foul play. I am an old cur at a crust, and can sleep dog-sleep when I list.“

— Miguel de Cervantes
Context: I was ever charitable and good to the poor, and scorn to take the bread out of another man's mouth. On the other side, by our Lady, they shall play me no foul play. I am an old cur at a crust, and can sleep dog-sleep when I list. I can look sharp as well as another, and let me alone to keep the cobwebs out of my eyes. I know where the shoe wrings me. I will know who and who is together. Honesty is the best policy, I will stick to that. The good shall have my hand and heart, but the bad neither foot nor fellowship. And in my mind, the main point of governing, is to make a good beginning. Ch. 33, as translated by Pierre Antoine Motteux in The History of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha (1701) Variant translations: I'm kind-hearted by nature, and full of compassion for the poor; there's no stealing the loaf from him who kneads and bakes; and by my faith it won't do to throw false dice with me; I am an old dog, and I know all about 'tus, tus;' I can be wide-awake if need be, and I don't let clouds come before my eyes, for I know where the shoe pinches me; I say so, because with me the good will have support and protection, and the bad neither footing nor access. And it seems to me that, in governments, to make a beginning is everything; and maybe, after having been governor a fortnight, I'll take kindly to the work and know more about it than the field labour I have been brought up to. Honesty's the best policy.

„Time ripens all things. No man is born wise.“

— Miguel de Cervantes
Context: Time ripens all things. No man is born wise. Bishops are made of men and not of stones. Ch. 33. Note: "Time ripens all things" is the translator's interpolation and does not appear in the original Spanish text.

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„Honesty is the best policy, I will stick to that. The good shall have my hand and heart, but the bad neither foot nor fellowship. And in my mind, the main point of governing, is to make a good beginning.“

— Miguel de Cervantes
Context: I was ever charitable and good to the poor, and scorn to take the bread out of another man's mouth. On the other side, by our Lady, they shall play me no foul play. I am an old cur at a crust, and can sleep dog-sleep when I list. I can look sharp as well as another, and let me alone to keep the cobwebs out of my eyes. I know where the shoe wrings me. I will know who and who is together. Honesty is the best policy, I will stick to that. The good shall have my hand and heart, but the bad neither foot nor fellowship. And in my mind, the main point of governing, is to make a good beginning. Ch. 33, as translated by Pierre Antoine Motteux in The History of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha (1701) Variant translations: I'm kind-hearted by nature, and full of compassion for the poor; there's no stealing the loaf from him who kneads and bakes; and by my faith it won't do to throw false dice with me; I am an old dog, and I know all about 'tus, tus;' I can be wide-awake if need be, and I don't let clouds come before my eyes, for I know where the shoe pinches me; I say so, because with me the good will have support and protection, and the bad neither footing nor access. And it seems to me that, in governments, to make a beginning is everything; and maybe, after having been governor a fortnight, I'll take kindly to the work and know more about it than the field labour I have been brought up to. Honesty's the best policy.

„To withdraw is not to run away, and to stay is no wise action when there is more reason to fear than to hope. 'Tis the part of a wise man to keep himself today for tomorrow, and not venture all his eggs in one basket.“

— Miguel de Cervantes
Context: To withdraw is not to run away, and to stay is no wise action when there is more reason to fear than to hope. 'Tis the part of a wise man to keep himself today for tomorrow, and not venture all his eggs in one basket. And though I am but a clown, or a bumpkin, as you may say, yet I would have you to know I know what is what, and have always taken care of the main chance... Sancho to Don Quixote, in Ch. 9, Peter Anthony Motteux translation (1701).

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