Zitate von Philip Stanhope Chesterfield

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Philip Stanhope Chesterfield

Geburtstag: 22. September 1694
Todesdatum: 24. März 1773
Andere Namen: Philip Stanhope, Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4º Conde de Chesterfield, Philip Dormer Stanhope Chesterfield, Philip Stanhope Earl of Chesterfield, Philip Chesterfield, IV° Conte di Chesterfield, Philip Dormer Stanhope

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Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4. Earl of Chesterfield KG PC war ein britischer Staatsmann und Schriftsteller. Bis zum Tod seines Vaters 1726 war er als Lord Stanhope bekannt. Er ist heute vor allem als Schriftsteller bekannt.

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Zitate Philip Stanhope Chesterfield

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„Eher wird ein Unrecht verziehen als eine Beleidigung.“

—  Philip Stanhope Chesterfield
Briefe über die anstrengende Kunst, ein Gentleman zu werden

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„Du musst dich jetzt anstrengen oder nie.“

—  Philip Stanhope Chesterfield
Briefe über die anstrengende Kunst, ein Gentleman zu werden

„We must not suppose that, because a man is a rational animal, he will, therefore, always act rationally; or, because he has such or such a predominant passion, that he will act invariably and consequentially in pursuit of it.“

—  Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield
Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman (1774), Context: We must not suppose that, because a man is a rational animal, he will, therefore, always act rationally; or, because he has such or such a predominant passion, that he will act invariably and consequentially in pursuit of it. No, we are complicated machines; and though we have one main spring that gives motion to the whole, we have an infinity of little wheels, which, in their turns, retard, precipitate, and sometime stop that motion. 19 December 1749

„You foolish man, you do not understand your own foolish business.“

—  Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield
Disputed, Attributed to Chesterfield by George Agar-Ellis, 1st Baron Dover, in his 1833 edition of Horace Walpole's letters to Sir Horace Mann, such statements have been attributed to many others, such as Lord Chief Justice Campbell, William Henry Maule (in the form "You silly old fool, you don't even know the alphabet of your own silly old business"), Sir William Harcourt, Lord Pembroke, Lord Westbury, and to an anonymous judge, and said to have been spoken in court to Garter King at Arms, Rouge Dragon Pursuivant, or some other high-ranking herald, who had confused a "bend" with a "bar" or had demanded fees to which he was not entitled. George Bernard Shaw uses it in Pygmalion (1912) in the form, "The silly people dont [sic] know their own silly business." Similar remarks occur in Charles Jenner's The Placid Man: Or, The Memoirs of Sir Charles Beville (1770): "Sir Harry Clayton ... was perhaps far better qualified to have written a Peerage of England than Garter King at Arms, or Rouge Dragon, or any of those parti-coloured officers of the court of honor, who, as a great man complained on a late solemnity, are but too often so silly as not to know their own silly business." "Old Lord Pembroke" (Henry Herbert, 9th Earl of Pembroke) is said by Horace Walpole (in a letter of 28 May 1774 to the Rev. William Cole) to have directed the quip, "Thou silly fellow! Thou dost not know thy own silly business," at John Anstis, Garter King at Arms. Edmund Burke also quotes such a remark in his "Speech in the Impeachment of Warren Hastings, Esq." on 7 May 1789: "'Silly man, that dost not know thy own silly trade!' was once well said: but the trade here is not silly."

„A weak mind is like a microscope, which magnifies trifling things but cannot receive great ones.“

—  Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield
Disputed, Generally attributed to Lord Chesterfield, the first publication of this yet located is in a section of proverbs called "Diamond Dust" in Eliza Cook's Journal, No. 98 (15 March 1851), with the first attribution to Chesterfield as yet located in: Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1862) edited by Henry Southgate

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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