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Charles Dickens

Geburtstag: 7. Februar 1812
Todesdatum: 9. Juni 1870

Charles John Huffam Dickens, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts war ein englischer Schriftsteller. Ihm wird große literaturgeschichtliche Bedeutung beigemessen. 2015 wählten 82 internationale Literaturkritiker und -wissenschaftler vier seiner Romane zu den bedeutendsten britischen Romanen: David Copperfield, Bleak House, Große Erwartungen sowie Dombey und Sohn. Zu seinen bekanntesten Werken gehören außerdem Oliver Twist, Eine Geschichte aus zwei Städten sowie Eine Weihnachtsgeschichte.

Werk

Große Erwartungen
Große Erwartungen
Charles Dickens
The Old Curiosity Shop
Charles Dickens

Zitate Charles Dickens

„Der Himmel weiß, dass wir uns niemals unserer Tränen schämen müssen, denn sie sind der Regen auf den blind machenden Staub der Erde, der über unserem harten Herzen liegt.“

—  Charles Dickens, buch Große Erwartungen
Große Erwartungen (Great Expectations), Große Erwartungen (Great Expectations), Kapitel 19 Original engl.: "Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts."

„In diesem Leben haben wir nichts als Tatsachen nötig, mein Herr: nichts als Tatsachen.«“

—  Charles Dickens
Schwere Zeiten (Hard Times), Schwere Zeiten, Erstes Kapitel, gutenberg.spiegel.de http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/?id=5&xid=4014&kapitel=2&cHash=31c32fc3c1chap002#gb_found Original engl.: "In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir; nothing but Facts!"

„Ich glaube, dass die Beobachtungsgabe vieler sehr junger Kinder wegen ihrer Nähe und Genauigkeit etwas sehr Wunderbares ist. Wahrhaftig denke ich, dass man von den meisten Erwachsenen, die in dieser Hinsicht bemerkenswert sind, weniger sagen kann, dass sie diese Fähigkeit erworben, als vielmehr, dass sie sie nicht verloren haben.“

—  Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, David Copperfield, Kapitel 2, I Observe Original engl.: "I believe the power of observation in numbers of very young children to be quite wonderful for its closeness and accuracy. Indeed, I think that most grown men who are remarkable in this respect, may with greater propriety be said not to have lost the faculty, than to have acquired it."

„Auch eine schwere Tür hat nur einen kleinen Schlüssel nötig.“

—  Charles Dickens
Unsortiert, Zur Strecke gebracht (Hunted Down), Kapitel II. Original engl.: "A very little key will open a very heavy door."

„Ich fühle, dass Kleinigkeiten die Summe des Lebens ausmachen.“

—  Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, David Copperfield, Kapitel 53, Another Retrospect Original engl.: "I […] feel the truth, that trifles make the sum of life."

„Ohne schlechte Menschen gäbe es keine guten Anwälte.“

—  Charles Dickens, buch The Old Curiosity Shop
Unsortiert, Der Raritätenladen (The Old Curiosity Shop), Kapitel 56 / Mr. Brass Original engl.: "If there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers."

„Kinder erleben nichts so scharf und bitter wie Ungerechtigkeit.“

—  Charles Dickens, buch Große Erwartungen
Große Erwartungen (Great Expectations), Große Erwartungen (Great Expectations), Kapitel 8 Original engl.: "In the little world in which children have their existence […], there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt, as injustice."

„Tatsachen, Tatsachen, Tatsachen gaben sich in jedem wesentlichen Anblick der Stadt kund; und Tatsachen, Tatsachen, Tatsachen in jedem nicht wesentlichen. […] Was man also nicht mit Zahlen beweisen und dartun konnte, daß es auf dem billigsten Markte zu kaufen und auf dem teuersten zu verkaufen war, das hatte keine Existenzberechtigung, das sollte niemals sein, bis zu aller Welt Ende, Amen.“

—  Charles Dickens
Schwere Zeiten (Hard Times), Schwere Zeiten, Fünftes Kapitel. gutenberg.spiegel.de http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/?id=5&xid=4014&kapitel=6&cHash=31c32fc3c12#gb_found Original engl.: "Fact, fact, fact, everywhere in the material aspect of the town; fact, fact, fact, everywhere in the immaterial. [...] what you couldn't state in figures, or show to be purchaseable in the cheapest market and saleable in the dearest, was not, and never should be, world without end, Amen."

„Ja, auf den Boden.“

—  Charles Dickens
Letzte Worte, Letzte Worte, zu seiner Schwägerin Mrs. Hogarth, die ihn drängte sich hinzulegen, 9. Juni 1870; Mary (Mamie) Dickens: My Father As I Recall Him; Chapter VI Original engl.: "Yes, on the ground."

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„He was not unamiable, but he could at any time have viewed the execution of a dog, or the assassination of an infant, with the liveliest satisfaction. Their habits were at variance with his love of order; and his love of order, was as powerful as his love of life.“

—  Charles Dickens
Context: There were two classes of created objects which he held in the deepest and most unmingled horror: they were, dogs and children. He was not unamiable, but he could at any time have viewed the execution of a dog, or the assassination of an infant, with the liveliest satisfaction. Their habits were at variance with his love of order; and his love of order, was as powerful as his love of life. "A Dinner at Poplar Walk" (1833), later published as "Mr. Minns and his Cousin"

„Christmas time! That man must be a misanthrope indeed, in whose breast something like a jovial feeling is not roused — in whose mind some pleasant associations are not awakened — by the recurrence of Christmas.“

—  Charles Dickens, buch Sketches by Boz
Sketches by Boz (1836-1837), Context: Christmas time! That man must be a misanthrope indeed, in whose breast something like a jovial feeling is not roused — in whose mind some pleasant associations are not awakened — by the recurrence of Christmas. There are people who will tell you that Christmas is not to them what it used to be; that each succeeding Christmas has found some cherished hope, or happy prospect, of the year before, dimmed or passed away; that the present only serves to remind them of reduced circumstances and straitened incomes — of the feasts they once bestowed on hollow friends, and of the cold looks that meet them now, in adversity and misfortune. Never heed such dismal reminiscences. There are few men who have lived long enough in the world, who cannot call up such thoughts any day in the year. Then do not select the merriest of the three hundred and sixty-five for your doleful recollections, but draw your chair nearer the blazing fire — fill the glass and send round the song — and if your room be smaller than it was a dozen years ago, or if your glass be filled with reeking punch, instead of sparkling wine, put a good face on the matter, and empty it off-hand, and fill another, and troll off the old ditty you used to sing, and thank God it’s no worse. Look on the merry faces of your children (if you have any) as they sit round the fire. One little seat may be empty; one slight form that gladdened the father’s heart, and roused the mother’s pride to look upon, may not be there. Dwell not upon the past; think not that one short year ago, the fair child now resolving into dust, sat before you, with the bloom of health upon its cheek, and the gaiety of infancy in its joyous eye. Reflect upon your present blessings — of which every man has many — not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some. Fill your glass again, with a merry face and contented heart. Our life on it, but your Christmas shall be merry, and your new year a happy one! Characters, Ch. 2 : A Christmas Dinner

„I put a New Testament among your books, for the very same reasons, and with the very same hopes that made me write an easy account of it for you, when you were a little child; because it is the best book that ever was or will be known in the world,“

—  Charles Dickens
Context: I put a New Testament among your books, for the very same reasons, and with the very same hopes that made me write an easy account of it for you, when you were a little child; because it is the best book that ever was or will be known in the world, and because it teaches you the best lessons by which any human creature who tries to be truthful and faithful to duty can possibly be guided. As your brothers have gone away, one by one, I have written to each such words as I am now writing to you, and have entreated them all to guide themselves by this book, putting aside the interpretations and inventions of men. Letter to Edward Dickens (26 September 1868), published in The Selected Letters of Charles Dickens http://books.google.com.br/books?id=NJH1g1i4gnIC&printsec=frontcover&hl=pt-BR#v=onepage&q&f=false, Edited by Jenny Hartley

„Mr. Augustus Minns was a bachelor, of about forty as he said — of about eight-and-forty as his friends said.“

—  Charles Dickens
Context: Mr. Augustus Minns was a bachelor, of about forty as he said — of about eight-and-forty as his friends said. He was always exceedingly clean, precise, and tidy: perhaps somewhat priggish, and the most retiring man in the world. First lines of Dicken's first published work, originally titled "A Dinner at Poplar Walk" (1833), later published as "Mr. Minns and his Cousin"

„It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live and die in London.“

—  Charles Dickens, buch Sketches by Boz
Sketches by Boz (1836-1837), Context: It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live and die in London. He awakens no sympathy in the breast of any single person; his existence is a matter of interest to no one save himself; he cannot be said to be forgotten when he dies, for no one remembered him when he was alive. There is a numerous class of people in this great metropolis who seem not to possess a single friend, and whom nobody appears to care for. Urged by imperative necessity in the first instance, they have resorted to London in search of employment, and the means of subsistence. It is hard, we know, to break the ties which bind us to our homes and friends, and harder still to efface the thousand recollections of happy days and old times, which have been slumbering in our bosoms for years, and only rush upon the mind, to bring before it associations connected with the friends we have left, the scenes we have beheld too probably for the last time, and the hopes we once cherished, but may entertain no more. These men, however, happily for themselves, have long forgotten such thoughts. Old country friends have died or emigrated; former correspondents have become lost, like themselves, in the crowd and turmoil of some busy city; and they have gradually settled down into mere passive creatures of habit and endurance. Characters, Ch. 1 : Thoughts About People

„Reflect upon your present blessings — of which every man has many — not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.“

—  Charles Dickens, buch Sketches by Boz
Sketches by Boz (1836-1837), Context: Christmas time! That man must be a misanthrope indeed, in whose breast something like a jovial feeling is not roused — in whose mind some pleasant associations are not awakened — by the recurrence of Christmas. There are people who will tell you that Christmas is not to them what it used to be; that each succeeding Christmas has found some cherished hope, or happy prospect, of the year before, dimmed or passed away; that the present only serves to remind them of reduced circumstances and straitened incomes — of the feasts they once bestowed on hollow friends, and of the cold looks that meet them now, in adversity and misfortune. Never heed such dismal reminiscences. There are few men who have lived long enough in the world, who cannot call up such thoughts any day in the year. Then do not select the merriest of the three hundred and sixty-five for your doleful recollections, but draw your chair nearer the blazing fire — fill the glass and send round the song — and if your room be smaller than it was a dozen years ago, or if your glass be filled with reeking punch, instead of sparkling wine, put a good face on the matter, and empty it off-hand, and fill another, and troll off the old ditty you used to sing, and thank God it’s no worse. Look on the merry faces of your children (if you have any) as they sit round the fire. One little seat may be empty; one slight form that gladdened the father’s heart, and roused the mother’s pride to look upon, may not be there. Dwell not upon the past; think not that one short year ago, the fair child now resolving into dust, sat before you, with the bloom of health upon its cheek, and the gaiety of infancy in its joyous eye. Reflect upon your present blessings — of which every man has many — not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some. Fill your glass again, with a merry face and contented heart. Our life on it, but your Christmas shall be merry, and your new year a happy one! Characters, Ch. 2 : A Christmas Dinner

„Love is not a feeling to pass away,
Like the balmy breath of a summer day;
It is not — it cannot be — laid aside;
It is not a thing to forget or hide.“

—  Charles Dickens
Context: p>Love is not a feeling to pass away, Like the balmy breath of a summer day; It is not — it cannot be — laid aside; It is not a thing to forget or hide. It clings to the heart, ah, woe is me! As the ivy clings to the old oak tree.Love is not a passion of earthly mould, As a thirst for honour, or fame, or gold: For when all these wishes have died away, The deep strong love of a brighter day, Though nourished in secret, consumes the more, As the slow rust eats to the iron’s core.</p Lucy's Song in The Village Coquettes (1836); later published in The Poems and Verses of Charles Dickens (1903)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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