Zitate von Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge Foto
2  0

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Geburtstag: 21. Oktober 1772
Todesdatum: 25. Juli 1834

Werbung

Samuel Taylor Coleridge [ˈkoʊlərɪdʒ oder ˈkoʊlrɪdʒ] war ein englischer Dichter der Romantik, Kritiker und Philosoph. Zusammen mit William Wordsworth und Robert Southey gehörte er den sogenannten Lake Poets an. Sein bekanntestes Werk ist die Ballade The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – veröffentlicht 1798 in der gemeinsam mit Wordsworth herausgegebenen Sammlung Lyrical Ballads, die nach traditioneller Auffassung die englische Romantik begründete.

Coleridge prägte die Formel von der willentlichen Aussetzung der Ungläubigkeit.

Zitate Samuel Taylor Coleridge

„Der betet gut, wer Liebe hegt // Für alle, groß und klein! // Gott, der uns schuf, der liebt uns all', // Will allen Vater sein.“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Der alte Matrose (The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere), [Der Siedler lebt im grünen Wald], www. zeno. org

Werbung

„A poet ought not to pick nature's pocket: let him borrow, and so borrow as to repay by the very act of borrowing.“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: A poet ought not to pick nature's pocket: let him borrow, and so borrow as to repay by the very act of borrowing. Examine nature accurately, but write from recollection; and trust more to your imagination than to your memory. 22 September 1830.

„Flowers are lovely; love is flower-like;
Friendship is a sheltering tree“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: Flowers are lovely; love is flower-like; Friendship is a sheltering tree; Oh the joys that came down shower-like, Of friendship, love, and liberty, Ere I was old! "Youth and Age", st. 2 (1823–1832).

„Old Friends burn dim, like lamps in noisome air,
Love them for what they are; nor love them less,
Because to thee they are not what they were.“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: O wiselier then, from feeble yearnings freed, While, and on whom, thou may'st — shine on! nor heed Whether the object by reflected light Return thy radiance or absorb it quite: And tho' thou notest from thy safe recess Old Friends burn dim, like lamps in noisome air, Love them for what they are; nor love them less, Because to thee they are not what they were.

Werbung

„The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other according to their relative worth and dignity.“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity, that blends, and (as it were) fuses, each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which I would exclusively appropriate the name of Imagination. Ch. XIV.

„Hast thou a charm to stay the morning-star
In his steep course?“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: Hast thou a charm to stay the morning-star In his steep course? So long he seems to pause On thy bald awful head, О sovran Blanc! St. 1.

„I worshipped the Invisible alone.“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: O dread and silent mount! I gazed upon thee, Till thou, still present to the bodily sense, Didst vanish from my thought : entranced in prayer, I worshipped the Invisible alone.

„The Beautiful arises from the perceived harmony of an object, whether sight or sound, with the inborn and constitutive rules of the judgment and imagination: and it is always intuitive.“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: The Good consists in the congruity of a thing with the laws of the reason and the nature of the will, and in its fitness to determine the latter to actualize the former: and it is always discursive. The Beautiful arises from the perceived harmony of an object, whether sight or sound, with the inborn and constitutive rules of the judgment and imagination: and it is always intuitive.

Werbung

„Bloom, O ye Amaranths! bloom for whom ye may,
For me ye bloom not!“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: Bloom, O ye Amaranths! bloom for whom ye may, For me ye bloom not! Glide, rich streams, away! With lips unbrightened, wreathless brow, I stroll: And would you learn the spells that drowse my soul? Work without Hope draws nectar in a sieve, And Hope without an object cannot live. l. 9.

„Awake,
Voice of sweet song! awake, my heart, awake!
Green vales and icy cliffs, all join my hymn.“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: Awake, my soul! not only passive praise Thou owest! not alone these swelling tears, Mute thanks and secret ecstasy. Awake, Voice of sweet song! awake, my heart, awake! Green vales and icy cliffs, all join my hymn.

„In nature there is nothing melancholy.“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: "Most musical, most melancholy" bird! A melancholy bird! Oh! idle thought! In nature there is nothing melancholy. But some night-wandering man, whose heart was pierced With the remembrance of a grievous wrong, Or slow distemper, or neglected love, (And so, poor wretch! filled all things with himself, And made all gentle sounds tell back the tale Of his own sorrow) he, and such as he, First named these notes a melancholy strain. The Nightingale: A Conversation Poem, lines 13-22 (1798).

„Could I revive within me
Her symphony and song,
To such a deep delight 'twould win me,
That with music loud and long,
I would build that dome in air,
That sunny dome! those caves of ice!
And all who heard should see them there,
And all should cry, Beware! Beware!
His flashing eyes, his floating hair!
Weave a circle round him thrice,
And close your eyes with holy dread,
For he on honey-dew hath fed,
And drunk the milk of Paradise.“

— Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Context: A damsel with a dulcimer In a vision once I saw: It was an Abyssinian maid, And on her dulcimer she played, Singing of Mount Abora. Could I revive within me Her symphony and song, To such a deep delight 'twould win me, That with music loud and long, I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome! those caves of ice! And all who heard should see them there, And all should cry, Beware! Beware! His flashing eyes, his floating hair! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise.

Nächster
Die heutige Jubiläen
Alexander Issajewitsch Solschenizyn Foto
Alexander Issajewitsch Solschenizyn12
russischer Schriftsteller, Dramatiker, Historiker und Lit... 1918 - 2008
Michael Richter5
deutscher Zeithistoriker und Aphoristiker 1952
Omar Khayyam Foto
Omar Khayyam9
1048 - 1131
Alma Mahler-Werfel Foto
Alma Mahler-Werfel3
österreichische Komponistin 1879 - 1964
Weitere 12 heute Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
William Blake Foto
William Blake8
englischer Maler und Dichter
Clemens Brentano Foto
Clemens Brentano10
deutscher Schriftsteller
Friedrich Schiller Foto
Friedrich Schiller248
deutscher Dichter, Philosoph und Historiker
Don Marquis Foto
Don Marquis3
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller, Dichter und Journalist
Zacharias Werner Foto
Zacharias Werner10
deutscher Dichter und Dramatiker der Romantik
 Ovid Foto
Ovid37
römischer Dichter
Heinrich Heine Foto
Heinrich Heine86
deutscher Dichter und Publizist
Charles Dickens Foto
Charles Dickens9
englischer Schriftsteller
William McDougall Foto
William McDougall6
englisch-amerikanischer Psychologe
Jackson Pollock Foto
Jackson Pollock2
US-amerikanischer Maler