Zitate von Miguel de Unamuno

Miguel de Unamuno Foto
10   1

Miguel de Unamuno

Geburtstag: 29. September 1864
Todesdatum: 31. Dezember 1936

Miguel de Unamuno y Jugo war ein spanischer Philosoph und Schriftsteller.

Werk

Zitate Miguel de Unamuno

„Eine gewisse Anzahl von Müßiggängern ist notwendig zur Entwicklung einer höheren Kultur.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

Plädoyer des Müßiggangs. Ausgewählt und aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2. Auflage 1996, ISBN 3-85420-442-6, S. 19

„Das Volk glaubt nämlich nicht an sich selbst. Und Gott schweigt. Hierin liegt der Grund der universellen Tragödie: Gott schweigt. Und er schweigt, weil er Atheist ist.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 71

„Das Vollendete, das Perfekte, ist der Tod, und das Leben kann nicht sterben.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 96

„Der Mensch arbeitet, um Arbeit zu vermeiden, er arbeitet, um nicht zu arbeiten. Es ist unglaublich, welche Arbeiten der Mensch auf sich nimmt, nur um nicht arbeiten zu müssen.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

Plädoyer des Müßiggangs. Ausgewählt und aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2. Auflage 1996, S. 21 ISBN 3-85420-442-6

„Der Verstand einigt uns und die Wahrheiten trennen uns.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 65

„Ein Problem setzt nicht so sehr eine Lösung voraus, im analytischen oder auflösenden Sinne, als vielmehr eine Konstruktion, eine Kreation. Es löst sich im Tun.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 114

„In einem Volk, bei dem viel gearbeitet wird, ist die Arbeit meist schlecht verteilt; dort gibt es mehr Leute, die viel arbeiten, damit die anderen faulenzen können.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

Plädoyer des Müßiggangs. Ausgewählt und aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2. Auflage 1996, ISBN 3-85420-442-6, S. 18

„Ist der Weg nicht schon Heimat?“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 127

„Und wenn die Geschichte nichts als das Lachen Gottes wäre? Jede Revolution eine seiner Lachsalven?“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 97

„Die Wissenschaft ist ein Kirchhof abgestorbener Ideen, wenn sie auch Leben spendet.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno, Del sentimiento trágico de la vida

Das Tragische Lebensgefühl. Deutsch von Robert Friese. München: Meyer & Jessen 1925, S. 116. Oft verkürzt zu: "Die Wissenschaft ist ein Friedhof toter Ideen."
Original spanisch: "La ciencia es un cementerio de ideas muertas, aunque de ellas salga vida." - Del sentimiento trágico de la vida. Renacimiento, 1913, p. 92 books.google https://books.google.de/books?id=Pxg2AQAAMAAJ&q=cementerio

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„Yes, I know well that others before me have felt what I feel and express; that many others feel it today, although they keep silence about it.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), VI : In the Depths of the Abyss
Kontext: Yes, I know well that others before me have felt what I feel and express; that many others feel it today, although they keep silence about it.... And I do not keep silence about it because it is for many the thing which must not be spoken, the abomination of abominations — infandum — and I believe that it is necessary now and again to speak the thing which must not be spoken.... Even if it should lead only to irritating the devotees of progress, those who believe that truth is consolation, it would lead to not a little. To irritating them and making them say: "Poor fellow! if he would only use his intelligence to better purpose!... Someone perhaps will add that I do not know what I say, to which I shall reply that perhaps he may be right — and being right is such a little thing! — but that I feel what I say and I know what I feel and that suffices me. And that it is better to be lacking in reason than to have too much of it.

„There is no tyranny in the world more hateful than that of ideas.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

Recalled by Walter Starkie from a conversation he had with Unamuno, as related in the Epilogue of Unamuno http://books.google.com/books?id=u8DG-eCTtM4C&lpg=PR1&dq=Unamuno&pg=PA240#v=onepage&q=%22There%20is%20no%20tyranny%20in%20the%20world%20more%20hateful%20than%20that%20of%20ideas%22&f=false.
Kontext: There is no tyranny in the world more hateful than that of ideas. Ideas bring ideophobia, and the consequence is that people begin to persecute their neighbors in the name of ideas. I loathe and detest all labels, and the only label that I could now tolerate would be that of ideoclast or idea breaker.

„Knowledge is employed in the service of the necessity of life and primarily in the service of the instinct of personal preservation.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), II : The Starting-Point
Kontext: Knowledge is employed in the service of the necessity of life and primarily in the service of the instinct of personal preservation. The necessity and this instinct have created in man the organs of knowledge and given them such capacity as they possess. Man sees, hears, touches, tastes and smells that which it is necessary for him to see, hear, touch, taste and smell in order to preserve his life. The decay or loss of any of these senses increases the risks with which his life is environed, and if it increases them less in the state of society in which we are actually living, the reason is that some see, hear, touch, taste and smell for others. A blind man, by himself and without a guide, could not live long. Society is an additional sense; it is the true common sense.

„I neither want to die nor do I want to want to die; I want to live for ever and ever and ever.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), III : The Hunger of Immortality
Kontext: Glorious is the risk! — καλος γαρ ο κινδυνος, glorious is the risk that we are able to run of our souls never dying … Faced with this risk, I am presented with arguments designed to eliminate it, arguments demonstrating the absurdity of the belief in the immortality of the soul; but these arguments fail to make any impression on me, for they are reasons and nothing more than reasons, and it is not with reasons that the heart is appeased. I do not want to die — no; I neither want to die nor do I want to want to die; I want to live for ever and ever and ever. I want this "I" to live — this poor "I" that I am and that I feel myself to be here and now, and therefore the problem of the duration of my soul, of my own soul, tortures me.

„Love personalizes all that it loves. Only by personalizing it can we fall in love with an idea.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), VII : Love, Suffering, Pity
Kontext: Consciousness (conscientia) is participated knowledge, is co-feeling, and co-feeling is com-passion. Love personalizes all that it loves. Only by personalizing it can we fall in love with an idea. And when love is so great and so vital, so strong and so overflowing, that it loves everything, then it personalizes everything and discovers that the total All, that the Universe, is also a person possessing a Consciousness, a Consciousness which in its turn suffers, pities, and loves, and therefore is consciousness. And this Consciousness of the Universe, which a love, personalizing all that it loves, discovers, is what we call God.

„And through this despair he reaches the heroic fury of which Giordano Bruno spoke — that intellectual Don Quixote who escaped from the cloister — and became an awakener of sleeping souls (dormitantium animorum excubitor), as the ex-Dominican said of himself — he who wrote: "Heroic love is the property of those superior natures who are called insane (insano) not because they do not know, but because they over-know (soprasanno)."“

—  Miguel de Unamuno

The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), Conclusion : Don Quixote in the Contemporary European Tragi-Comedy
Kontext: Science does not give Don Quixote what he demands of it. "Then let him not make the demand," it will be said, "let him resign himself, let him accept life and truth as they are." But he does not accept them as they are, and he asks for signs, urged thereto by Sancho, who stands by his side. And it is not that Don Quixote does not understand what those understand who talk thus to him, those who succeed in resigning themselves and accepting rational life and rational truth. No, it is that the needs of his heart are greater. Pedantry? Who knows!... And he wishes, unhappy man, to rationalize the irrational and irrationalize the rational. And he sinks into despair of the critical century whose two greatest victims were Nietzsche and Tolstoi. And through this despair he reaches the heroic fury of which Giordano Bruno spoke — that intellectual Don Quixote who escaped from the cloister — and became an awakener of sleeping souls (dormitantium animorum excubitor), as the ex-Dominican said of himself — he who wrote: "Heroic love is the property of those superior natures who are called insane (insano) not because they do not know, but because they over-know (soprasanno)."

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Ähnliche Autoren

George Santayana Foto
George Santayana2
spanischer Philosoph und Schriftsteller
Pablo Picasso Foto
Pablo Picasso100
spanischer Maler, Grafiker und Bildhauer
Zygmunt Bauman Foto
Zygmunt Bauman70
britisch-polnischer Soziologe und Philosoph
Salvador Dalí Foto
Salvador Dalí107
spanischer Maler, Grafiker, Schriftsteller, Bildhauer und B…
Michel Foucault Foto
Michel Foucault10
französischer Philosoph
Paul Valéry Foto
Paul Valéry4
französischer Philosoph, Essayist, Schriftsteller und Lyrik…
Reinhold Niebuhr Foto
Reinhold Niebuhr2
US-amerikanischer Theologe, Philosoph und Politikwissenscha…
Walter Benjamin Foto
Walter Benjamin46
deutscher Schriftsteller, Kritiker und Philosoph
Émile Michel Cioran Foto
Émile Michel Cioran57
rumänischer Philosoph
Albert Camus Foto
Albert Camus98
französischer Schriftsteller und Philosoph
Heutige Jubiläen
Sigmund Freud Foto
Sigmund Freud34
Begründer der Psychoanalyse 1856 - 1939
Pablo Neruda Foto
Pablo Neruda37
chilenischer Schriftsteller 1904 - 1973
Alexander Sutherland Neill Foto
Alexander Sutherland Neill6
britischer Reformpädagoge 1883 - 1973
Theodor Körner Foto
Theodor Körner17
deutscher Schriftsteller 1791 - 1813
Weitere 55 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
George Santayana Foto
George Santayana2
spanischer Philosoph und Schriftsteller
Pablo Picasso Foto
Pablo Picasso100
spanischer Maler, Grafiker und Bildhauer
Zygmunt Bauman Foto
Zygmunt Bauman70
britisch-polnischer Soziologe und Philosoph
Salvador Dalí Foto
Salvador Dalí107
spanischer Maler, Grafiker, Schriftsteller, Bildhauer und B…
Michel Foucault Foto
Michel Foucault10
französischer Philosoph