Zitate von Miguel de Unamuno

Miguel de Unamuno Foto
10   0

Miguel de Unamuno

Geburtstag: 29. September 1864
Todesdatum: 31. Dezember 1936

Miguel de Unamuno y Jugo war ein spanischer Philosoph und Schriftsteller.

Werk

Zitate Miguel de Unamuno

„Die Wissenschaft ist ein Kirchhof abgestorbener Ideen, wenn sie auch Leben spendet.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno, Del sentimiento trágico de la vida
Das Tragische Lebensgefühl. Deutsch von Robert Friese. München: Meyer & Jessen 1925, S. 116. Oft verkürzt zu: "Die Wissenschaft ist ein Friedhof toter Ideen." Original spanisch: "La ciencia es un cementerio de ideas muertas, aunque de ellas salga vida." - Del sentimiento trágico de la vida. Renacimiento, 1913, p. 92 books.google https://books.google.de/books?id=Pxg2AQAAMAAJ&q=cementerio

„In einem Volk, bei dem viel gearbeitet wird, ist die Arbeit meist schlecht verteilt; dort gibt es mehr Leute, die viel arbeiten, damit die anderen faulenzen können.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
Plädoyer des Müßiggangs. Ausgewählt und aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2. Auflage 1996, ISBN 3-85420-442-6, S. 18

„Das Vollendete, das Perfekte, ist der Tod, und das Leben kann nicht sterben.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 96

„Ist der Weg nicht schon Heimat?“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 127

„Eine gewisse Anzahl von Müßiggängern ist notwendig zur Entwicklung einer höheren Kultur.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
Plädoyer des Müßiggangs. Ausgewählt und aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2. Auflage 1996, ISBN 3-85420-442-6, S. 19

„Ein Problem setzt nicht so sehr eine Lösung voraus, im analytischen oder auflösenden Sinne, als vielmehr eine Konstruktion, eine Kreation. Es löst sich im Tun.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 114

„Das Volk glaubt nämlich nicht an sich selbst. Und Gott schweigt. Hierin liegt der Grund der universellen Tragödie: Gott schweigt. Und er schweigt, weil er Atheist ist.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 71

„Und wenn die Geschichte nichts als das Lachen Gottes wäre? Jede Revolution eine seiner Lachsalven?“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 97

„Der Verstand einigt uns und die Wahrheiten trennen uns.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
Wie man einen Roman macht. Aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2000, ISBN 3-85420-543-0, S. 65

„Der Mensch arbeitet, um Arbeit zu vermeiden, er arbeitet, um nicht zu arbeiten. Es ist unglaublich, welche Arbeiten der Mensch auf sich nimmt, nur um nicht arbeiten zu müssen.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
Plädoyer des Müßiggangs. Ausgewählt und aus dem Spanischen übersetzt von Erna Pfeiffer, Literaturverlag Droschl Graz - Wien, 2. Auflage 1996, S. 21 ISBN 3-85420-442-6

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„In the most secret chamber of the spirit of him who believes himself convinced that death puts an end to his personal consciousness, his memory, for ever, and all unknown to him perhaps, there lurks a shadow, a vague shadow, a shadow of uncertainty“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), VI : In the Depths of the Abyss, Context: In the most secret chamber of the spirit of him who believes himself convinced that death puts an end to his personal consciousness, his memory, for ever, and all unknown to him perhaps, there lurks a shadow, a vague shadow, a shadow of uncertainty, and while he says within himself, "Well, let us live this life that passes away, for there is no other!" the silence of this secret chamber speaks to him and murmurs, "Who knows!... " These voices are like the humming of a mosquito when the south-west wind roars through the trees in the wood; we cannot distinguish this faint humming, yet nevertheless, merged in the clamor of the storm, it reaches the ear.

„He who bases or thinks he bases his conduct — his inward or his outward conduct, his feeling or his action — upon a dogma or a principle which he deems incontrovertible, runs the risk of becoming a fanatic, and moreover, the moment that this dogma is weakened or shattered, the morality based upon it gives way.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), XI : The Practical Problem, Context: He who bases or thinks he bases his conduct — his inward or his outward conduct, his feeling or his action — upon a dogma or a principle which he deems incontrovertible, runs the risk of becoming a fanatic, and moreover, the moment that this dogma is weakened or shattered, the morality based upon it gives way. If the earth that he thought firm begins to rock, he himself trembles at the earthquake, for we do not all come up to the standard of the ideal Stoic who remains undaunted among the ruins of a world shattered into atoms. Happily the stuff that is underneath a man's ideas will save him. For if a man should tell you that he does not defraud or cuckold his best friend only because he is afraid of hell, you may depend upon it that neither would he do so even if he were to cease to believe in hell, but that he would invent some other excuse instead. And this is all to the honor of the human race.

„Imagination, which is the social sense, animates the inanimate and anthropomorphizes everything“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), VII : Love, Suffering, Pity, Context: Imagination, which is the social sense, animates the inanimate and anthropomorphizes everything; it humanizes everything and even makes everything identical with man. And the work of man is to supernaturalize Nature — that is to say, to make it divine by making it human, to help it to become conscious of itself, in short. The action of reason, on the other hand, is to mechanize or materialize.

„And this God, the living God, your God, our God, is in me, is in you, lives in us, and we live and move and have our being in Him.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), VIII : From God to God, Context: And this God, the living God, your God, our God, is in me, is in you, lives in us, and we live and move and have our being in Him. And he is in us by virtue of the hunger, the longing, which we have for Him, He is Himself creating the longing for Himself.

„If a philosopher is not a man, he is anything but a philosopher; he is above all a pedant, and a pedant is a caricature of a man.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), I : The Man of Flesh and Bone, Context: If a philosopher is not a man, he is anything but a philosopher; he is above all a pedant, and a pedant is a caricature of a man. The cultivation of any branch of science — of chemistry, of physics, of geometry, of philology — may be a work of differentiated specialization, and even so, only within very narrow limits and restrictions; but philosophy, like poetry, is a work of integration and synthesis, or else it is merely pseudo-philosophical erudition.

„The truth is sum, ergo cogito — I am, therefore I think, although not everything that is thinks. Is not consciousness of thinking above all consciousness of being?“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), II : The Starting-Point, Context: The truth is sum, ergo cogito — I am, therefore I think, although not everything that is thinks. Is not consciousness of thinking above all consciousness of being? Is pure thought possible, without consciousness of self, without personality? Can there exist pure knowledge without feeling, without that species of materiality which feelings lends to it? Do we not perhaps feel thought, and do we not feel ourselves in the act of knowing and willing? Could not the man in the stove [Descartes] have said: "I feel, therefore I am"? or "I will, therefore I am"? And to feel oneself, is it not perhaps to feel oneself imperishable?

„Jesus said that God was not the God of the dead, but of the living.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), X : Religion, the Mythology of the Beyond and the Apocatastasis, Context: Jesus said that God was not the God of the dead, but of the living. And the other life is not, in fact, thinkable to us except under the same forms as those of this earthly and transitory life.

„I believe in the immortal origin of this yearning for immortality, which is the very substance of my soul.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), III : The Hunger of Immortality, Context: I am dreaming...? Let me dream, if this dream is my life. Do not awaken me from it. I believe in the immortal origin of this yearning for immortality, which is the very substance of my soul. But do I really believe in it...? And wherefore do you want to be immortal? you ask me, wherefore? Frankly, I do not understand the question, for it is to ask the reason of the reason, the end of the end, the principle of the principle.

„The most authentic Catholic ethic, monastic asceticism, is an ethic of eschatology, directed to the salvation of the individual soul rather than to the maintenance of society.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno
The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), IV : The Essence of Catholicism, Context: The most authentic Catholic ethic, monastic asceticism, is an ethic of eschatology, directed to the salvation of the individual soul rather than to the maintenance of society. And in the cult of virginity may there not perhaps be a certain obscure idea that to perpetuate ourselves in others hinders our own personal perpetuation?

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Ähnliche Autoren

Pablo Picasso Foto
Pablo Picasso95
spanischer Maler, Grafiker und Bildhauer
Michel Foucault Foto
Michel Foucault8
französischer Philosoph
Reinhold Niebuhr Foto
Reinhold Niebuhr2
US-amerikanischer Theologe, Philosoph und Politikwissenscha…
Walter Benjamin Foto
Walter Benjamin46
deutscher Schriftsteller, Kritiker und Philosoph
Émile Michel Cioran Foto
Émile Michel Cioran102
rumänischer Philosoph
Albert Camus Foto
Albert Camus98
französischer Schriftsteller und Philosoph
Ludwig Wittgenstein Foto
Ludwig Wittgenstein37
österreichisch-britischer Philosoph
Jean Paul Sartre Foto
Jean Paul Sartre107
französischer Romancier, Dramatiker, Philosoph und Publizist
Martin Heidegger Foto
Martin Heidegger22
deutscher Philosoph
Erich Fromm Foto
Erich Fromm35
deutscher Psychoanalytiker, Philosoph und Sozialpsychologe
Heutige Jubiläen
Thomas Hobbes Foto
Thomas Hobbes80
englischer Mathematiker, Staatstheoretiker und Philosoph 1588 - 1679
Bette Davis Foto
Bette Davis2
US-amerikanische Bühnen- und Filmschauspielerin 1908 - 1989
Kurt Cobain Foto
Kurt Cobain41
US-amerikanischer Rockmusiker 1967 - 1994
Allen Ginsberg Foto
Allen Ginsberg7
US-amerikanischer Dichter 1926 - 1997
Weitere 63 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Pablo Picasso Foto
Pablo Picasso95
spanischer Maler, Grafiker und Bildhauer
Michel Foucault Foto
Michel Foucault8
französischer Philosoph
Reinhold Niebuhr Foto
Reinhold Niebuhr2
US-amerikanischer Theologe, Philosoph und Politikwissenscha…
Walter Benjamin Foto
Walter Benjamin46
deutscher Schriftsteller, Kritiker und Philosoph
Émile Michel Cioran Foto
Émile Michel Cioran102
rumänischer Philosoph
x