Zitate von Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine Foto
3   0

Thomas Paine

Geburtstag: 9. Februar 1737
Todesdatum: 8. Juni 1809
Andere Namen: Пейн Томас

Thomas Paine, geboren als Thomas Pain, war ein einflussreicher politischer Intellektueller und einer der Gründerväter der Vereinigten Staaten im Zeitalter der Aufklärung. Wikipedia

Werk

Zitate Thomas Paine

„Die Gesellschaft ist in jedem Zustande ein Segen, während die Regierung selbst im besten Zustande nur ein nothwendiges, im schlechtesten Zustande aber ein unerträgliches Uebel ist; […].“

—  Thomas Paine

Der gesunde Menschenverstand, in: Die politischen Werke von Thomas Paine, Erster Band, Philadelphia 1852. S. 178
Original engl.: "Society in every state is a blessing, but government even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one; [...]." - Common Sense (14. Februar 1776), Philadelphia: Bradford. MDCCLXXVI. p. 7 , en.wikisource http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Common_Sense

„Unabhängigkeit ist mein Glück, und ich sehe die Dinge wie sie sind ohne Rücksicht auf Ort oder Person: mein Vaterland ist die Welt, und meine Religion ist Gutes thun.“

—  Thomas Paine, buch Die Rechte des Menschen

Die Rechte des Menschen: Aus dem Englischen übersetzt. Worin Grundsatz und Ausübung verbunden sind. Zweiter Theil, Kopenhagen 1792, S. 115
Original engl.: "Independence is my happiness, and I view things as they are, without regard to place or person; my country is the world, and my religion is to do good." - "Rights of Man" (1792), Part Two, Chapter V, en.wikisource https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Rights_of_Man

„Society is produced by our wants, and government by wickedness“

—  Thomas Paine

1770s, Common Sense (1776)
Kontext: Society is produced by our wants, and government by wickedness; the former promotes our happiness positively by uniting our affections, the latter negatively by restraining our vices. The one encourages intercourse, the other creates distinctions. The first is a patron, the last a punisher. Society in every state is a blessing, but government even in its best state is but a necessary evil.

„From the errors of other nations, let us learn wisdom“

—  Thomas Paine, buch Common Sense

Quelle: Common Sense

„Give me liberty, or give me death.“

—  Thomas Paine, buch Common Sense

Quelle: Common Sense

„Time makes more converts than reason.“

—  Thomas Paine, buch Common Sense

Quelle: Common Sense

„The mind once enlightened cannot again become dark.“

—  Thomas Paine

Quelle: A Letter Addressed to the Abbe Raynal on the Affairs of North America

„These are the times that try men's souls.“

—  Thomas Paine, buch The American Crisis

Quelle: The American Crisis

„Independence is my happiness, and I view things as they are, without regard to place or person; my country is the world, and my religion is to do good.“

—  Thomas Paine, buch Die Rechte des Menschen

Part 2.7 Chapter V. Ways and means of improving the condition of Europe, interspersed with miscellaneous observations
Quelle: 1790s, Rights of Man, Part 2 (1792)
Kontext: I speak an open and disinterested language, dictated by no passion but that of humanity. To me, who have not only refused offers, because I thought them improper, but have declined rewards I might with reputation have accepted, it is no wonder that meanness and imposition appear disgustful. Independence is my happiness, and I view things as they are, without regard to place or person; my country is the world, and my religion is to do good.

„But the dejection lasts only for a moment; they soon rise out of it with additional vigor; the glow of hope, courage and fortitude, will, in a little time, supply the place of every inferior passion, and kindle the whole heart into heroism.“

—  Thomas Paine

The Crisis No. IV.
1770s, The American Crisis (1776–1783)
Kontext: Men who are sincere in defending their freedom, will always feel concern at every circumstance which seems to make against them; it is the natural and honest consequence of all affectionate attachments, and the want of it is a vice. But the dejection lasts only for a moment; they soon rise out of it with additional vigor; the glow of hope, courage and fortitude, will, in a little time, supply the place of every inferior passion, and kindle the whole heart into heroism.

„There never did, there never will, and there never can, exist a Parliament, or any description of men, or any generation of men, in any country, possessed of the right or the power of binding and controlling posterity to the "end of time," or of commanding for ever how the world shall be governed“

—  Thomas Paine, buch Die Rechte des Menschen

Part 1.3 Rights of Man
1790s, Rights of Man, Part I (1791)
Kontext: There never did, there never will, and there never can, exist a Parliament, or any description of men, or any generation of men, in any country, possessed of the right or the power of binding and controlling posterity to the "end of time," or of commanding for ever how the world shall be governed, or who shall govern it; and therefore all such clauses, acts or declarations by which the makers of them attempt to do what they have neither the right nor the power to do, nor the power to execute, are in themselves null and void. Every age and generation must be as free to act for itself in all cases as the age and generations which preceded it. The vanity and presumption of governing beyond the grave is the most ridiculous and insolent of all tyrannies. Man has no property in man; neither has any generation a property in the generations which are to follow.

„Toleration is not the opposite of Intolerance, but is the counterfeit of it. Both are despotisms.“

—  Thomas Paine, buch Die Rechte des Menschen

Part 1.3 Rights of Man
1790s, Rights of Man, Part I (1791)
Kontext: Toleration is not the opposite of Intolerance, but is the counterfeit of it. Both are despotisms. The one assumes to itself the right of withholding Liberty of Conscience, and the other of granting it. The one is the Pope armed with fire and faggot, and the other is the Pope selling or granting indulgences. The former is church and state, and the latter is church and traffic.

„I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.“

—  Thomas Paine

The Crisis No. I.
1770s, The American Crisis (1776–1783)
Kontext: It matters not where you live, or what rank of life you hold, the evil or the blessing will reach you all. The far and the near, the home counties and the back, the rich and the poor, will suffer or rejoice alike. The heart that feels not now is dead; the blood of his children will curse his cowardice, who shrinks back at a time when a little might have saved the whole, and made them happy. I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.
My own line of reasoning is to myself as straight and clear as a ray of light. Not all the treasures of the world, so far as I believe, could have induced me to support an offensive war, for I think it murder; but if a thief breaks into my house, burns and destroys my property, and kills or threatens to kill me, or those that are in it, and to "bind me in all cases whatsoever" to his absolute will, am I to suffer it? What signifies it to me, whether he who does it is a king or a common man; my countryman or not my countryman; whether it be done by an individual villain, or an army of them? If we reason to the root of things we shall find no difference; neither can any just cause be assigned why we should punish in the one case and pardon in the other. Let them call me rebel and welcome, I feel no concern from it; but I should suffer the misery of devils, were I to make a whore of my soul by swearing allegiance to one whose character is that of a sottish, stupid, stubborn, worthless, brutish man.

Ähnliche Autoren

Benjamin Franklin Foto
Benjamin Franklin99
amerikanischer Drucker, Verleger, Schriftsteller, Naturwiss…
Jean De La Fontaine Foto
Jean De La Fontaine18
Schriftsteller, Poet
Miguel de Cervantes Foto
Miguel de Cervantes75
spanischer Schriftsteller
Nicolas Chamfort Foto
Nicolas Chamfort29
französischer Schriftsteller
Johann Kaspar Lavater Foto
Johann Kaspar Lavater3
Schweizer Pfarrer, Philosoph und Schriftsteller
Francois Fénelon Foto
Francois Fénelon4
französischer Geistlicher und Schriftsteller
Luc de Clapiers de Vauvenargues Foto
Luc de Clapiers de Vauvenargues40
französischer Philosoph, Moralist und Schriftsteller
Alexander Pope Foto
Alexander Pope14
englischer Dichter, Übersetzer und Schriftsteller
Edmund Burke Foto
Edmund Burke13
Schriftsteller, Staatsphilosoph und Politiker
Daniel Defoe Foto
Daniel Defoe10
englischer Schriftsteller und Journalist
Heutige Jubiläen
Charles de Montesquieu Foto
Charles de Montesquieu34
französischer Schriftsteller und Staatsphilosoph 1689 - 1755
Arno Schmidt Foto
Arno Schmidt22
deutscher Schriftsteller und Autor von Zettel’s Traum 1914 - 1979
Carl Zuckmayer Foto
Carl Zuckmayer8
deutscher Schriftsteller 1896 - 1977
A.A. Milne Foto
A.A. Milne10
englischer Schriftsteller 1882 - 1956
Weitere 63 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Benjamin Franklin Foto
Benjamin Franklin99
amerikanischer Drucker, Verleger, Schriftsteller, Naturwiss…
Jean De La Fontaine Foto
Jean De La Fontaine18
Schriftsteller, Poet
Miguel de Cervantes Foto
Miguel de Cervantes75
spanischer Schriftsteller
Nicolas Chamfort Foto
Nicolas Chamfort29
französischer Schriftsteller
Johann Kaspar Lavater Foto
Johann Kaspar Lavater3
Schweizer Pfarrer, Philosoph und Schriftsteller