„The duty of man is not a wilderness of turnpike gates, through which he is to pass by tickets from one to the other. It is plain and simple, and consists but of two points. His duty to God, which every man must feel; and with respect to his neighbor, to do as he would be done by. If those to whom power is delegated do well, they will be respected: if not, they will be despised; and with regard to those to whom no power is delegated, but who assume it, the rational world can know nothing of them.“

—  Thomas Paine, buch Die Rechte des Menschen

Part 1.3 Rights of Man
1790s, Rights of Man, Part I (1791)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 23. Januar 2022. Geschichte
Thomas Paine Foto
Thomas Paine3
Schriftsteller und Erfinder 1737 - 1809

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John Locke Foto

„The people cannot delegate to government the power to do anything which would be unlawful for them to do themselves.“

—  John Locke English philosopher and physician 1632 - 1704

This might be a paraphrase of some of Locke's expressions or ideas, but the earliest publication of the statement in this form seems to be one made in Oversight Hearing on the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Act (1997).
Misattributed

John Magufuli Foto

„Those criticising the president have nothing better to do. It is for the president to decide which meetings he wants to attend and which he wants to delegate to the vice-president or the prime minister who can also serve the purpose“

—  John Magufuli Tanzanian politician 1959

Head of Political Science and Public Administration Department at the University of Dar es Salaam, Dr Benson Bana, faulted those criticising Dr Magufuli, stressing that the president is setting the nation in order (referring to how Magufuli does not attend meetings), quoted on Daily News, "Magufuli backed on foreign trips" http://dailynews.co.tz/index.php/home-news/46632-magufuli-backed-on-foreign-trips, February 3, 2015.
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„Failure to delegate causes managers to be crushed and fail under the weight of accumulated duties that they do not know and have not learned to delegate.“

—  James D. Mooney American businessman 1884 - 1957

James D. Mooney (1931), cited in: Guy Kimberley Hutt (1990), Organizational decentralization and delegation in large New York. p. 1

Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton Foto
Aldous Huxley Foto
Jane Austen Foto
Theodore Roosevelt Foto
Thomas Paine Foto
Giovanni della Casa Foto

„This power of attention is that which perhaps more than any thing else distinguishes those who do great things from those who can do nothing well.“

—  George Long English classical scholar 1800 - 1879

An Old Man's Thoughts on Many Things, Of Education I

Friedrich Nietzsche Foto

„How much reverence has a noble man for his enemies!—and such reverence is a bridge to love.—For he desires his enemy for himself, as his mark of distinction; he can endure no other enemy than one in whom there is nothing to despise and very much to honor!“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche, buch Zur Genealogie der Moral

Essay 1, Section 11
On the Genealogy of Morality (1887)
Kontext: To be incapable of taking one's enemies, one's accidents, even one's misdeeds seriously for very long—that is the sign of strong, full natures in whom there is an excess of the power to form, to mold, to recuperate and to forget[... ] Such a man shakes off with a single shrug many vermin that eat deep into others; here alone genuine 'love of one's enemies' is possible—supposing it to be possible at all on earth. How much reverence has a noble man for his enemies!—and such reverence is a bridge to love.—For he desires his enemy for himself, as his mark of distinction; he can endure no other enemy than one in whom there is nothing to despise and very much to honor!

Wendell Berry Foto

„I am speaking of the life of a man who knows that the world is not given by his fathers, but borrowed from his children; who has undertaken to cherish it and do it no damage, not because he is duty-bound, but because he loves the world and loves his children“

—  Wendell Berry author 1934

Kontext: I am speaking of the life of a man who knows that the world is not given by his fathers, but borrowed from his children; who has undertaken to cherish it and do it no damage, not because he is duty-bound, but because he loves the world and loves his children; whose work serves the earth he lives on and from and with, and is therefore pleasurable and meaningful and unending; whose rewards are not deferred until "retirement," but arrive daily and seasonally out of the details of the life of their place; whose goal is the continuance of the life of the world, which for a while animates and contains them, and which they know they can never compass with their understanding or desire.

The Unforeseen Wilderness : An Essay on Kentucky's Red River Gorge (1971), p. 33; what is likely a paraphrase of a portion of this has existed since at least 1997, and has sometimes become misattributed to John James Audubon: A true conservationist is a man who knows that the world is not given by his fathers, but borrowed from his children.

Karen Armstrong Foto

„Respect only has meaning as respect for those with whom I do not agree.“

—  Karen Armstrong, buch A History of God

A History of God (1993)
Quelle: A History of God: The 4,000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

Marcel Duchamp Foto

„The only man in the past whom I really respect was Seurat... He didn't let his hand interfere with his mind.“

—  Marcel Duchamp French painter and sculptor 1887 - 1968

Quote from Bride and the Bachelors, Tomkins, p. 24; as quoted in Outside the Lines, David W. Galenson, Harvard University Press, 2001, p. 109
posthumous

Immanuel Kant Foto

„He [Jesus] claims that not the observance of outer civil or statutory churchly duties but the pure moral disposition of the heart alone can make man well-pleasing to God (Matthew V, 20-48); … that injury done one’s neighbor can be repaired only through satisfaction rendered to the neighbor himself, not through acts of divine worship (V, 24). Thus, he says, does he intend to do full justice to the Jewish law (V, 17); whence it is obvious that not scriptural scholarship but the pure religion of reason must be the law’s interpreter, for taken according to the letter, it allowed the very opposite of all this. Furthermore, he does not leave unnoticed, in his designations of the strait gate and the narrow way, the misconstruction of the law which men allow themselves in order to evade their true moral duty, holding themselves immune through having fulfilled their churchly duty (VII, 13). He further requires of these pure dispositions that they manifest themselves also in works (VII, 16) and, on the other hand, denies the insidious hope of those who imagine that, through invocation and praise of the Supreme Lawgiver in the person of His envoy, they will make up for their lack of good works and ingratiate themselves into favor (VII, 21). Regarding these works he declares that they ought to be performed publicly, as an example for imitation (V, 16), and in a cheerful mood, not as actions extorted from slaves (VI, 16); and that thus, from a small beginning in the sharing and spreading of such dispositions, religion, like a grain of seed in good soil, or a ferment of goodness, would gradually, through its inner power, grow into a kingdom of God (XIII, 31-33).“

—  Immanuel Kant German philosopher 1724 - 1804

Book IV, Part 1, Section 1, “The Christian religion as a natural religion”
Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (1793)

Benito Mussolini Foto

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