„There never did, there never will, and there never can, exist a Parliament, or any description of men, or any generation of men, in any country, possessed of the right or the power of binding and controlling posterity to the "end of time," or of commanding for ever how the world shall be governed“

—  Thomas Paine, buch Die Rechte des Menschen

Part 1.3 Rights of Man
1790s, Rights of Man, Part I (1791)
Kontext: There never did, there never will, and there never can, exist a Parliament, or any description of men, or any generation of men, in any country, possessed of the right or the power of binding and controlling posterity to the "end of time," or of commanding for ever how the world shall be governed, or who shall govern it; and therefore all such clauses, acts or declarations by which the makers of them attempt to do what they have neither the right nor the power to do, nor the power to execute, are in themselves null and void. Every age and generation must be as free to act for itself in all cases as the age and generations which preceded it. The vanity and presumption of governing beyond the grave is the most ridiculous and insolent of all tyrannies. Man has no property in man; neither has any generation a property in the generations which are to follow.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Thomas Paine Foto
Thomas Paine3
Schriftsteller und Erfinder 1737 - 1809

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Thomas Carlyle Foto
James A. Garfield Foto

„There never can be a convention… that shall bind my vote against my will on any question whatever.“

—  James A. Garfield American politician, 20th President of the United States (in office in 1881) 1831 - 1881

Speech at the 1880 Republican National Convention http://fairfaxfreecitizen.com/2015/07/02/22640/
1880s

William S. Burroughs Foto

„You see control can never be a means to any practical end. … Control can never be a means to anything but more control … like Junk.“

—  William S. Burroughs, buch Naked Lunch

Islam Incorporated and the Parties of Interzone
Naked Lunch (1959)

Robert Jordan Foto

„How, then, can the rights of three men exceed the rights of two men? In what possible way can the rights of three men absorb the rights of two men, and make them as if they had never existed.“

—  Auberon Herbert British politician 1838 - 1906

The Contemporary Review
Kontext: AHow, then, can the rights of three men exceed the rights of two men? In what possible way can the rights of three men absorb the rights of two men, and make them as if they had never existed. Rights are not things which grow by using the multiplication table. here are two men. If there are such things as rights, these two men must evidently start with equal rights. How shall you, then, by multiplying one of the two, even a thousand times over, give him larger rights than the other, since each new unit that appears only brings with him his own rights; or how, by multiplying one of the units up to the point of exhausting the powers of the said multiplication table, shall you take from the other the rights with which he started?

Frederick Douglass Foto

„Can any colored man, or any white man friendly to the freedom of all men, ever forget the night which followed the first day of January 1863, when the world was to see if Abraham Lincoln would prove to be as good as his word? I shall never forget that memorable night“

—  Frederick Douglass American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman 1818 - 1895

1870s, Oratory in Memory of Abraham Lincoln (1876)
Kontext: Can any colored man, or any white man friendly to the freedom of all men, ever forget the night which followed the first day of January 1863, when the world was to see if Abraham Lincoln would prove to be as good as his word? I shall never forget that memorable night, when in a distant city I waited and watched at a public meeting, with three thousand others not less anxious than myself, for the word of deliverance which we have heard read today. Nor shall I ever forget the outburst of joy and thanksgiving that rent the air when the lightning brought to us the emancipation proclamation. In that happy hour we forgot all delay, and forgot all tardiness, forgot that the President had bribed the rebels to lay down their arms by a promise to withhold the bolt which would smite the slave-system with destruction; and we were thenceforward willing to allow the President all the latitude of time, phraseology, and every honorable device that statesmanship might require for the achievement of a great and beneficent measure of liberty and progress.

George Edward Ellis Foto

„The Bible, the Holy Scriptures, will never henceforward to any generation, in any part of the globe, be, or stand for, to individuals or groups of men and women, what is was to the early English Puritans.“

—  George Edward Ellis American Unitarian clergyman and historian (1814-1894) 1814 - 1894

[Narrative and Critical History of America: English explorations and settlements in North America, 1497-1689, edited by Justin Winsor, 1889, vol. III, The Religious Element in the Settlemen of New England.—Puritans and Separatists in England by George E. Ellis, 219–243, https://books.google.com/books?id=NhBkAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA229, 1884, Houghton, Mifflin and Company] (quote from p. 229)

William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield Foto
George Mason Foto

„Does any man suppose that one general national government can exist in so extensive a country as this?“

—  George Mason American delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention 1725 - 1792

Address to the Convention (4 June 1788) http://www.wwnorton.com/college/history/archive/resources/documents/ch07_04.htm
Addresses to the Virginia Ratifying Convention (1788)
Kontext: Does any man suppose that one general national government can exist in so extensive a country as this? I hope that a government may be framed which may suit us, by drawing a line between the general and state governments, and prevent that dangerous clashing of interest and power, which must, as it now stands, terminate in the destruction of one or the other. When we come to the judiciary, we shall be more convinced that this government will terminate in the annihilation of the state governments: the question then will be, whether a consolidated government can preserve the freedom and secure the rights of the people.
If such amendments be introduced as shall exclude danger, I shall most gladly put my hand to it. When such amendments as shall, from the best information, secure the great essential rights of the people, shall be agreed to by gentlemen, I shall most heartily make the greatest concessions, and concur in any reasonable measure to obtain the desirable end of conciliation and unanimity…

Joel Barlow Foto

„As the government of the United States is not in any sense founded on the Christian Religion,—as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of Musselmen,—and as the said States never have entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mehomitan nation, it is declared by the parties that no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.“

—  Joel Barlow American diplomat 1754 - 1812

Treaty of Tripoli, Article 11 http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/bar1796t.asp#art11, signed at Tripoli on November 4, 1796, and at Algiers on January 3, 1797 and received ratification unanimously from the U.S. Senate on June 7, 1797; it was signed into law by John Adams (the original language is by Joel Barlow, U.S. Consul). This is a declaration of the secular character of the government of the United States, sometimes misattributed to John Adams, who signed the treaty into law. A portion is also sometimes misattributed to George Washington, and also misquoted as "This nation of ours was not founded on Christian principles."
Treaty of Tripoli (1797)

Joseph De Maistre Foto
François Fénelon Foto

„The good historian is not for any time or any country: while he loves his fatherland, he never flatters it in anything.“

—  François Fénelon Catholic bishop 1651 - 1715

Le bon historien n'est d'aucun temps ni d'aucun pays: quoiqu'il aime sa patrie, il ne la flatte jamais en rien.
Lettre sur les Occupations de l'Académie Française, sect. 8, cited from Œuvres de Fénelon (Paris: Lefèvre, 1835) vol. 3, p. 240; translation by Patrick Riley, from Hans Blom et al. (eds.) Monarchisms in the Age of Enlightenment (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007) p. 86.

Thomas Paine Foto

„It is never to be expected in a revolution that every man is to change his opinion at the same moment. There never yet was any truth or any principle so irresistibly obvious that all men believed it at once.“

—  Thomas Paine English and American political activist 1737 - 1809

1790s, First Principles of Government (1795)
Kontext: It is never to be expected in a revolution that every man is to change his opinion at the same moment. There never yet was any truth or any principle so irresistibly obvious that all men believed it at once. Time and reason must cooperate with each other to the final establishment of any principle; and therefore those who may happen to be first convinced have not a right to persecute others, on whom conviction operates more slowly. The moral principle of revolutions is to instruct, not to destroy.

Thomas Jackson Foto

„Make it a rule never to accuse without due consideration any body or association of men.“

—  Thomas Jackson Confederate general 1824 - 1863

Misattributed, Jackson's personal book of maxims

Camille Paglia Foto

„Men are run ragged by female sexuality all their lives. From the beginning of his life to the end, no man ever fully commands any woman. It's an illusion.“

—  Camille Paglia American writer 1947

As quoted in Sexuality and Gender (2002) by Christine R. Williams and Arlene Stein, p. 213
Kontext: Men are run ragged by female sexuality all their lives. From the beginning of his life to the end, no man ever fully commands any woman. It's an illusion. Men are pussy-whipped. And they know it. That's what the strip clubs are about; not woman as victim, not woman as slave, but woman as goddess.

„True ideology has vanished, replaced by fear and fantasy. The right wing wants corporate control and a return to a past that never existed. The left wing wants government control and a future that will never exist.“

—  John Twelve Hawks, buch Spark

Spark (2014)
Kontext: True ideology has vanished, replaced by fear and fantasy. The right wing wants corporate control and a return to a past that never existed. The left wing wants government control and a future that will never exist. Both groups lose sight of the essential questions: how can the individual speak and think and create freely? New ideas are the only evolutionary force that will save us from destruction.

Lysander Spooner Foto
Edmund Burke Foto

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