„Government, like dress, is the badge of lost innocence; the palaces of kings are built on the ruins of the bowers of paradise.“

—  Thomas Paine, buch Common Sense

Quelle: Common Sense

Letzte Aktualisierung 17. Dezember 2021. Geschichte
Thomas Paine Foto
Thomas Paine3
Schriftsteller und Erfinder 1737 - 1809

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Ralph Waldo Emerson Foto

„What is there in 'Paradise Lost' to elevate and astonish like Herschel or Somerville?“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

Quoted in Robert D. Richardson, Jr., Emerson, the Mind On Fire (Univ. of Calif Press 1995), p. 124

Dr. Seuss Foto

„Cat, you ruined mom's dress!"
"Honey, it was ruined when she bought it.“

—  Dr. Seuss, buch The Cat in the Hat

Quelle: The Cat in the Hat

Cassandra Clare Foto

„And the gold of her ruined wedding dress.“

—  Cassandra Clare, buch Clockwork Princess

Quelle: Clockwork Princess

Stephen King Foto

„The town kept its secrets, and the Marsten House brooded over it like a ruined king.“

—  Stephen King, buch Brennen muss Salem

Quelle: 'Salem's Lot

Arthur Miller Foto
Richard Henry Stoddard Foto
Jean Jacques Rousseau Foto

„He thinks like a philosopher, but governs like a king.“

—  Jean Jacques Rousseau Genevan philosopher 1712 - 1778

Of Frederick the Great
Quelle: Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1765-1770; published 1782), Books VIII-XII, XII

Hilaire Belloc Foto

„Kings live in Palaces, and Pigs in sties,
And youth in Expectation. Youth is wise.“

—  Hilaire Belloc writer 1870 - 1953

"Habitations"
Sonnets and Verse (1938)

Henri Lefebvre Foto

„Castles, palaces, cathedrals, fortresses, all speak in their various ways of the greatness and the strength of the people who built them and against whom they were built.“

—  Henri Lefebvre French philosopher 1901 - 1991

From Critique of Everyday Life: Volume 1 (1947/1991)
Kontext: Everything great and splendid is founded on power and wealth. They are the basis of beauty. This is why the rebel and the anarchic protester who decries all of history and all the works of past centuries because he sees in them only the skills and the threat of domination is making a mistake. He sees alienated forms, but not the greatness within. The rebel can only see to the end of his own ‘private’ consciousness, which he levels against everything human, confusing the oppressors with the oppressed masses, who were nevertheless the basis and the meaning of history and past works. Castles, palaces, cathedrals, fortresses, all speak in their various ways of the greatness and the strength of the people who built them and against whom they were built. This real greatness shines through the fake grandeur of rulers and endows these buildings with a lasting ‘beauty’. The bourgeoisie is alone in having given its buildings a single, over-obvious meaning, impoverished, deprived of reality: that meaning is abstract wealth and brutal domination; that is why it has succeeded in producing perfect ugliness and perfect vulgarity. The man who denigrates the past, and who nearly always denigrates the present and the future as well, cannot understand this dialectic of art, this dual character of works and of history. He does not even sense it. Protesting against bourgeois stupidity and oppression, the anarchic individualist is enclosed in ‘private’ consciousness, itself a product of the bourgeois era, and no longer understands human power and the community upon which that power is founded. The historical forms of this community, from the village to the nation, escape him. He is, and only wants to be, a human atom (in the scientifically archaic sense of the word, where ‘atom’ meant the lowest isolatable reality). By following alienation to its very extremes he is merely playing into the hands of the bourgeoisie. Embryonic and unconscious, this kind of anarchism is very widespread. There is a kind of revolt, a kind of criticism of life, that implies and results in the acceptance of this life as the only one possible. As a direct consequence this attitude precludes any understanding of what is humanly possible.

Qasem Soleimani Foto

„One type of paradise that is portrayed for mankind is streams, beautiful nymphs and greeneries. But there is another kind of paradise. ... The warfront was the lost paradise of the human beings, indeed.“

—  Qasem Soleimani Iranian senior military officer 1957 - 2020

In a 2009 interview
Quoted in "Soleimani, a General Who Became Iran Icon by Targeting US" https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2020/01/02/world/middleeast/ap-ml-iran-qassem-soleimani.html. The Associated Press

Homér Foto

„Too many kings can ruin an army“

—  Homér Ancient Greek epic poet, author of the Iliad and the Odyssey

Robert Southwell Foto

„To rise by others' fall
I deem a losing gain;
All states with others' ruins built
To ruin run amain.“

—  Robert Southwell English Jesuit 1561 - 1595

Quelle: Content and Rich, Line 57; p. 59.

Aldous Huxley Foto

„Time Regained is Paradise Lost, and Time Lost is Paradise Regained. Let the dead bury their dead. If you want to live at every moment as it presents itself, you've got to die to every other moment.“

—  Aldous Huxley English writer 1894 - 1963

John Rivers in The Genius and the Goddess (1955)
Kontext: You can't worship a spirit in spirit, unless you do it now. Wallowing in the past may be good literature. As wisdom, it's hopeless. Time Regained is Paradise Lost, and Time Lost is Paradise Regained. Let the dead bury their dead. If you want to live at every moment as it presents itself, you've got to die to every other moment.

Edna St. Vincent Millay Foto

„Safe upon the solid rock the ugly houses stand;
Come and see my shining palace built upon the sand!“

—  Edna St. Vincent Millay, buch A Few Figs from Thistles

Quelle: "Second Fig" from A Few Figs from Thistles (1920)

William Blake Foto

„The moon like a flower
In heaven's high bower,
With silent delight,
Sits and smiles on the night.“

—  William Blake, Night

Night, st. 1
1780s, Songs of Innocence (1789–1790)

Robert Burns Foto

„A gaudy dress and gentle air May slightly touch the heart;
But it's innocence and modesty
that polished the dart.“

—  Robert Burns, Handsome Nell

Handsome Nell (1773) (also known as "My Handsome Nell"), st. 6.
Johnson's The Scots Musical Museum (1787-1796)

Gaio Valerio Catullo Foto

„Idleness ere now has ruined both kings and wealthy cities.“
Otium et reges prius et beatas perdidit urbes.

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo, list of poems by Catullus

LI, last lines
Carmina

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