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Herbert George Wells

Geburtstag: 21. September 1866
Todesdatum: 13. August 1946
Andere Namen: H.G. Wells, Герберт Уэллс

Herbert George Wells war ein englischer Schriftsteller und Pionier der Science-Fiction-Literatur. Wells, der auch Historiker und Soziologe war, schrieb u. a. Bücher mit Millionenauflage wie Die Geschichte unserer Welt. Er hatte seine größten Erfolge mit den beiden Science-Fiction-Romanen Der Krieg der Welten und Die Zeitmaschine. Wells ist in Deutschland vor allem für seine Science-Fiction-Bücher bekannt, hat aber auch zahlreiche realistische Romane verfasst, die im englischen Sprachraum nach wie vor populär sind. Wikipedia

Werk

Die Zeitmaschine
Die Zeitmaschine
Herbert George Wells

Zitate Herbert George Wells

„Was war eigentlich diese Zeitreiserei? Ein Mann konnte sich doch nicht mit Staub bedecken, indem er sich in einem Paradoxon herumwälzte, oder?“

—  Herbert George Wells, buch Die Zeitmaschine

Die Zeitmaschine, dtv München, 8.Auflage Mai 2002, ISBN 3-423-12234-X, Seite 25
Original engl.: "What was this time travelling? A man couldn't cover himself with dust by rolling in a paradox, could he?" - The Time Machine, ch. 2 fourmilab.ch http://www.fourmilab.ch/etexts/www/wells/timemach/html/timemach_chap2.html

„Moralische Entrüstung ist Eifersucht mit einem Heiligenschein.“

—  Herbert George Wells

Original engl.: "Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." - The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman (1914), in: The works of H.G. Wells, Band 16, Scribner 1924, p. 288 books.google http://books.google.de/books?id=oapbAAAAMAAJ&q=halo

„Und wir wissen heute - wie wenig wir wissen. Niemals wurde eine Beobachtung gemacht, ohne daß hundert Beobachtungen außer acht gelassen wurden. Nie wird etwas beurteilt, ohne daß uns eine boshafte Wahrheit verspottet und uns durch einen Irrtum wieder verlorenginge.“

—  Herbert George Wells

Menschen, Göttern gleich
Original engl.: "And we know to-day--how little we know. There is never an observation made but a hundred observations are missed in the making of it; there is never a measurement but some impish truth mocks us and gets away from us in the margin of error." - Men Like Gods (1923), III 3. The Service of the Earthling http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200221.txt

„Mir geht es gut.“

—  Herbert George Wells

Letzte Worte, 13. August 1946
Letzte Worte

„Zahllose Menschen […] werden die Neue Weltordnung hassen […] und bei dem Versuch sterben, gegen sie zu protestieren.“

—  Herbert George Wells

Original engl.: "Countless people, from maharajas to millionaires and from pukha sahibs to pretty ladies, will hate the new world order, be rendered unhappy by the frustration of their passions and ambitions through its advent and will die protesting against it." - The New World Order (1940) p. 127 books.google http://books.google.de/books?id=hzpR2uASeT8C&pg=PA127

„For neither do men live nor die in vain.“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The War of the Worlds

Book II, Ch. 8 (Ch. 25 in editions without Book divisions): Dead London
The War of the Worlds (1898)
Kontext: For so it had come about, as indeed I and many men might have foreseen had not terror and disaster blinded our minds. These germs of disease have taken toll of humanity since the beginning of things — taken toll of our prehuman ancestors since life began here. But by virtue of this natural selection of our kind we have developed resisting power; to no germs do we succumb without a struggle, and to many — those that cause putrefaction in dead matter, for instance — our living frames are altogether immune. But there are no bacteria in Mars, and directly these invaders arrived, directly they drank and fed, our microscopic allies began to work their overthrow. Already when I watched them they were irrevocably doomed, dying and rotting even as they went to and fro. It was inevitable. By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers; it would still be his were the Martians ten times as mighty as they are. For neither do men live nor die in vain.

„We do not want dictators, we do not want oligarchic parties or class rule, we want a widespread world intelligence conscious of itself.“

—  H. G. Wells, buch World Brain

Preface, p. xvi
World Brain (1938)
Kontext: We do not want dictators, we do not want oligarchic parties or class rule, we want a widespread world intelligence conscious of itself. To work out a way to that world brain organization is therefore our primary need in this age of imperative construction.

„And how will the new republic treat the inferior races?“

—  H. G. Wells

Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress Upon Human Life and Thought http://books.google.com/books?id=OTP8dQHO57UC (1901), The Faith, Morals, and Public Policy of The New Republic, pp. 340–343
Kontext: Money and credit are as much human contrivances as bicycles, and as liable to expansion and modification as any other sort of prevalent but imperfect machine.
And how will the new republic treat the inferior races? How will it deal with the black? how will it deal with the yellow man? how will it tackle that alleged termite in the civilized woodwork, the Jew? Certainly not as races at all. It will aim to establish, and it will at last, though probably only after a second century has passed, establish a world state with a common language and a common rule. All over the world its roads, its standards, its laws, and its apparatus of control will run. It will, I have said, make the multiplication of those who fall behind a certain standard of social efficiency unpleasant and difficult… The Jew will probably lose much of his particularism, intermarry with Gentiles, and cease to be a physically distinct element in human affairs in a century or so. But much of his moral tradition will, I hope, never die. … And for the rest, those swarms of black, and brown, and dirty-white, and yellow people, who do not come into the new needs of efficiency?
Well, the world is a world, not a charitable institution, and I take it they will have to go. The whole tenor and meaning of the world, as I see it, is that they have to go. So far as they fail to develop sane, vigorous, and distinctive personalities for the great world of the future, it is their portion to die out and disappear.
The world has a greater purpose than happiness; our lives are to serve God's purpose, and that purpose aims not at man as an end, but works through him to greater issues.

„Yet, across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us.“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The War of the Worlds

Book I, Ch. 1: The Eve of the War
The War of the Worlds (1898)
Kontext: No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same... Yet, across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us.

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„Nothing could have been more obvious to the people of the early twentieth century than the rapidity with which war was becoming impossible. And as certainly they did not see it.“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The World Set Free

The World Set Free (1914)
Kontext: Nothing could have been more obvious to the people of the early twentieth century than the rapidity with which war was becoming impossible. And as certainly they did not see it. They did not see it until the atomic bombs burst in their fumbling hands.

„There is, though I do not know how there is or why there is, a sense of infinite peace and protection in the glittering hosts of heaven.“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The Island of Doctor Moreau

Quelle: The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), Ch. 22: The Man Alone
Kontext: There is, though I do not know how there is or why there is, a sense of infinite peace and protection in the glittering hosts of heaven. There it must be, I think, in the vast and eternal laws of matter, and not in the daily cares and sins and troubles of men, that whatever is more than animal within us must find its solace and its hope.

„How far can we anticipate the habitations and ways, the usages and adventures, the mighty employments, the ever increasing knowledge and power of the days to come? No more than a child with its scribbling paper and its box of bricks can picture or model the undertakings of its adult years.“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The Open Conspiracy

The Open Conspiracy (1933)
Kontext: How far can we anticipate the habitations and ways, the usages and adventures, the mighty employments, the ever increasing knowledge and power of the days to come? No more than a child with its scribbling paper and its box of bricks can picture or model the undertakings of its adult years. Our battle is with cruelties and frustrations, stupid, heavy and hateful things from which we shall escape at last, less like victors conquering a world than like sleepers awaking from a nightmare in the dawn.... A time will come when men will sit with history before them or with some old newspaper before them and ask incredulously,"Was there ever such a world?"

„Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo.“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman

The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman (1914), p. 299
Kontext: Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo. It is the peculiar snare of the perplexed orthodox, and soon Mr. Brumley was in a state of nearly unendurable moral indignation with Sir Isaac for a hundred exaggerations of what he was and of what conceivably he might have done to his silent yet manifestly unsuitably married wife.

„No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The War of the Worlds

Book I, Ch. 1: The Eve of the War
The War of the Worlds (1898)
Kontext: No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same... Yet, across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us.

„More lives were wasted by the British generals alone on the opening day of what is known as the Somme offensive of July, 1916 than in the whole French Revolution from start to finish.“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The Outline of History

Quelle: The Outline of History (1920), Ch. 36
Kontext: From 1789 to late in 1791 the French Revolution was an orderly process, and from the summer of 1794 the Republic was an orderly and victorious state. The Terror was not the work of the whole country, but of the town mob which owed its existence and its savagery to the misrule, and social injustice of the ancient regime... More lives were wasted by the British generals alone on the opening day of what is known as the Somme offensive of July, 1916 than in the whole French Revolution from start to finish.

„Phase by phase these ill-adapted governments are becoming uncontrolled absolutisms; they are killing that free play of the individual mind which is the preservative of human efficiency and happiness“

—  H. G. Wells

The Rights of Man, or what are we fighting for? (1940)
Kontext: Throughout the whole world we see variations of this same subordination of the individual to the organisation of power. Phase by phase these ill-adapted governments are becoming uncontrolled absolutisms; they are killing that free play of the individual mind which is the preservative of human efficiency and happiness. The populations under their sway, after a phase of servile discipline, are plainly doomed to relapse into disorder and violence. Everywhere war and monstrous economic exploitation break out, so that those very same increments of power and opportunity which have brought mankind within sight of an age of limitless plenty, seem likely to be lost again, it may be lost forever, in an ultimate social collapse.

„All the miseries and discontents of life are due, he taught, to selfishness.“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The Outline of History

Quelle: The Outline of History (1920), Ch. 25
Kontext: The Buddha Is Nearer to Us You see clearly a man, simple, devout, lonely, battling for light, a vivid human personality, not a myth. Beneath a mass of miraculous fable I feel that there also was a man. He too, gave a message to mankind universal in its character. Many of our best modern ideas are in closest harmony with it. All the miseries and discontents of life are due, he taught, to selfishness. Selfishness takes three forms — one, the desire to satisfy the senses; second, the craving for immortality; and the third the desire for prosperity and worldliness. Before a man can become serene he must cease to live for his senses or himself. Then he merges into a greater being. Buddha in a different language called men to self-forgetfulness five hundred years before Christ. In some ways he was near to us and our needs. Buddha was more lucid upon our individual importance in service than Christ, and less ambiguous upon the question of personal immortality.

„By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The War of the Worlds

Book II, Ch. 8 (Ch. 25 in editions without Book divisions): Dead London
The War of the Worlds (1898)
Kontext: For so it had come about, as indeed I and many men might have foreseen had not terror and disaster blinded our minds. These germs of disease have taken toll of humanity since the beginning of things — taken toll of our prehuman ancestors since life began here. But by virtue of this natural selection of our kind we have developed resisting power; to no germs do we succumb without a struggle, and to many — those that cause putrefaction in dead matter, for instance — our living frames are altogether immune. But there are no bacteria in Mars, and directly these invaders arrived, directly they drank and fed, our microscopic allies began to work their overthrow. Already when I watched them they were irrevocably doomed, dying and rotting even as they went to and fro. It was inevitable. By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers; it would still be his were the Martians ten times as mighty as they are. For neither do men live nor die in vain.

„Money and credit are as much human contrivances as bicycles, and as liable to expansion and modification as any other sort of prevalent but imperfect machine.“

—  H. G. Wells

Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress Upon Human Life and Thought http://books.google.com/books?id=OTP8dQHO57UC (1901), The Faith, Morals, and Public Policy of The New Republic, pp. 340–343
Kontext: Money and credit are as much human contrivances as bicycles, and as liable to expansion and modification as any other sort of prevalent but imperfect machine.
And how will the new republic treat the inferior races? How will it deal with the black? how will it deal with the yellow man? how will it tackle that alleged termite in the civilized woodwork, the Jew? Certainly not as races at all. It will aim to establish, and it will at last, though probably only after a second century has passed, establish a world state with a common language and a common rule. All over the world its roads, its standards, its laws, and its apparatus of control will run. It will, I have said, make the multiplication of those who fall behind a certain standard of social efficiency unpleasant and difficult… The Jew will probably lose much of his particularism, intermarry with Gentiles, and cease to be a physically distinct element in human affairs in a century or so. But much of his moral tradition will, I hope, never die. … And for the rest, those swarms of black, and brown, and dirty-white, and yellow people, who do not come into the new needs of efficiency?
Well, the world is a world, not a charitable institution, and I take it they will have to go. The whole tenor and meaning of the world, as I see it, is that they have to go. So far as they fail to develop sane, vigorous, and distinctive personalities for the great world of the future, it is their portion to die out and disappear.
The world has a greater purpose than happiness; our lives are to serve God's purpose, and that purpose aims not at man as an end, but works through him to greater issues.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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