„By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers“

—  Herbert George Wells, buch The War of the Worlds

Book II, Ch. 8 (Ch. 25 in editions without Book divisions): Dead London
The War of the Worlds (1898)
Kontext: For so it had come about, as indeed I and many men might have foreseen had not terror and disaster blinded our minds. These germs of disease have taken toll of humanity since the beginning of things — taken toll of our prehuman ancestors since life began here. But by virtue of this natural selection of our kind we have developed resisting power; to no germs do we succumb without a struggle, and to many — those that cause putrefaction in dead matter, for instance — our living frames are altogether immune. But there are no bacteria in Mars, and directly these invaders arrived, directly they drank and fed, our microscopic allies began to work their overthrow. Already when I watched them they were irrevocably doomed, dying and rotting even as they went to and fro. It was inevitable. By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers; it would still be his were the Martians ten times as mighty as they are. For neither do men live nor die in vain.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Herbert George Wells Foto
Herbert George Wells5
englischer Schriftsteller 1866 - 1946

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Thomas Hood Foto

„His death which happened in his berth,
At forty-odd befell:
They went and told the sexton, and
The sexton tolled the bell.“

—  Thomas Hood British writer 1799 - 1845

Faithless Sally Brown, st. 17 (1826).
1820s

Immanuel Kant Foto

„Freedom is the alone unoriginated birthright of man, and belongs to him by force of his humanity“

—  Immanuel Kant German philosopher 1724 - 1804

Immanuel Kant, The Metaphysics of Ethics by Immanuel Kant, trans. J.W. Semple, ed. with Iintroduction by Rev. Henry Calderwood (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1886) (3rd edition). Chapter: GENERAL DIVISION OF JURISPRUDENCE. http://oll.libertyfund.org/?option=com_staticxt&staticfile=show.php%3Ftitle=1443&chapter=56215&layout=html&Itemid=27
Kontext: Freedom is the alone unoriginated birthright of man, and belongs to him by force of his humanity; and is independence on the will and co-action of every other in so far as this consists with every other person’s freedom.

Chief Seattle Foto
Annie Besant Foto

„Yet that is the most splendid privilege of man, that the true birthright of the human Spirit, to know his own Divinity, and then to realise it, to know his own Divinity and then to manifest it.“

—  Annie Besant British socialist, theosophist, women's rights activist, writer and orator 1847 - 1933

Quelle: The Theosophist, Volume 33 http://books.google.co.in/books?id=wJ9VAAAAYAAJ, p. 190

John Donne Foto

„Any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee.“

—  John Donne English poet 1572 - 1631

Modern version: No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friends or of thine own were; any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.
Meditation 17. This was the source for the title of Ernest Hemingway's novel.
Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions (1624)
Quelle: Meditation XVII - Meditation 17
Kontext: No man is an Iland, intire of it selfe; every man is a peece of the Continent, a part of the maine; if a Clod bee washed away by the Sea, Europe is the lesse, as well as if a Promontorie were, as well as if a Mannor of thy friends or of thine owne were; any mans death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankinde; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.

Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay Foto

„To every man upon this earth
Death cometh soon or late.
And how can man die better
Than facing fearful odds,
For the ashes of his fathers,
And the temples of his gods“

—  Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay, buch Lays of Ancient Rome

Horatius, st. 26 & 27; this quote is often truncated to read:
Lays of Ancient Rome (1842)
Kontext: Then out spake brave Horatius,
The Captain of the Gate:
"To every man upon this earth
Death cometh soon or late.
And how can man die better
Than facing fearful odds,
For the ashes of his fathers,
And the temples of his gods, And for the tender mother
Who dandled him to rest,
And for the wife who nurses
His baby at her breast,
And for the holy maidens
Who feed the eternal flame,
To save them from false Sextus
That wrought the deed of shame?"

Joyce Kilmer Foto

„There is no rope can strangle song
And not for long death takes his toll.
No prison bars can dim the stars
Nor quicklime eat the living soul.“

—  Joyce Kilmer American poet, editor, literary critic, soldier 1886 - 1918

"Easter Week"
Main Street and Other Poems (1917)

John Locke Foto

„Though the Earth, and all inferior Creatures be common to all Men, yet every Man has a Property in his own Person. Thus no Body has any Right to but himself.“

—  John Locke, buch Two Treatises of Government

Second Treatise of Government, Ch. V, sec. 27
Two Treatises of Government (1689)

Baruch Spinoza Foto

„A free man thinks of death least of all things; and his wisdom is a meditation not of death but of life.“
Homo liber de nulla re minus, quam de morte cogitat, et ejus sapientia non mortis, sed vitae meditatio est.

—  Baruch Spinoza, buch Ethics

Part IV, Prop. LXVII
Ethics (1677)

„The sole purpose of man on earth is to manifest his Creator. He has no other purpose.“

—  Walter Russell American philosopher 1871 - 1963

Quelle: A New Concept of the Universe (1953), p. 139

Eleanor Farjeon Foto

„He could not be captured,
He could not be bought,
His running was rhythm,
His standing was thought;
With one eye on sorrow
And one eye on mirth,
He galloped in heaven
And gambolled on earth.“

—  Eleanor Farjeon English children's writer 1881 - 1965

Pegasus, St. 3 & 4, p. 181
The New Book of Days (1961)
Kontext: He could not be captured,
He could not be bought,
His running was rhythm,
His standing was thought;
With one eye on sorrow
And one eye on mirth,
He galloped in heaven
And gambolled on earth. And only the poet
With wings to his brain
Can mount him and ride him
Without any rein,
The stallion of heaven,
The steed of the skies,
The horse of the singer
Who sings as he flies.

Edmund Clarence Stedman Foto

„The year of jubilee has come;
Gather the gifts of Earth with equal hand;
Henceforth ye too may share the birthright soil,
The corn, the wine, and all the harvest-home.“

—  Edmund Clarence Stedman American poet, critic, and essayist 1833 - 1908

"The Feast of the Harvest" in The Blameless Prince : And Other Poems (1869).

Montesquieu Foto

„A man should be mourned at his birth, not at his death.“

—  Montesquieu French social commentator and political thinker 1689 - 1755

No. 40. (Usbek writing to Ibben)
Lettres Persanes (Persian Letters, 1721)

William Morley Punshon Foto
Jane Austen Foto
Robert Browning Foto
George Fitzhugh Foto
Horatio Nelson Foto

„If a man consults whether he is to fight, when he has the power in his own hands, it is certain that his opinion is against fighting.“

—  Horatio Nelson Royal Navy Admiral 1758 - 1805

Statement (August 1801) [citation needed]
1800s

Muhammad al-Taqi Foto

„Man's death by sins is more than his death by fate and his life by charity is more than his life by age.“

—  Muhammad al-Taqi ninth of the Twelve Imams of Twelver Shi'ism 811 - 835

[Baqir Sharīf al-Qurashi, The life of Imam Muhammad al-Jawad, Wonderful Maxims and Arts, 2005]

Zygmunt Bauman Foto

„Man is in his short sojourn on earth equal to God in His eternity.“

—  Zygmunt Bauman Polish philosopher and sociologist 1925 - 2017

[paraphrasing the view of Seneca], p. 34.
The Art of Life (2008)

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