Zitate von James Branch Cabell

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James Branch Cabell

Geburtstag: 14. April 1879
Todesdatum: 5. Mai 1958

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James Branch Cabell war ein amerikanischer Autor phantastischer Romane. Eine zentrale Stellung nimmt dabei der in dem fiktiven, im Süden Frankreichs lokalisierten Land von Poictesme angesiedelte Romanzyklus Biography of the Life of Manuel ein .

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Zitate James Branch Cabell

„The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label.“

—  James Branch Cabell, The Silver Stallion
The Silver Stallion (1926), Context: Yet creeds mean very little... The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label. Coth, in Book Four : Coth at Porutsa, Ch. XXVI : The Realist in Defeat

„To-day alone was real. Never was man brought into contact with reality save through the evanescent emotions and sensations of that single moment, that infinitesimal fraction of a second, which was passing now — and it was in the insignificance of this moment, precisely, that religious persons must believe.“

—  James Branch Cabell, book The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: To-day alone was real. Never was man brought into contact with reality save through the evanescent emotions and sensations of that single moment, that infinitesimal fraction of a second, which was passing now — and it was in the insignificance of this moment, precisely, that religious persons must believe. So ran the teachings of all dead and lingering faiths alike. Here was, perhaps, only another instance of mankind's abhorrence of actualities; and man's quaint dislike of facing reality was here disguised as a high moral principle. That was why all art, which strove to make the sensations of a moment soul-satisfying, was dimly felt to be irreligious. For art performed what religion only promised. Ch. 26 : "Epper Si Muove"

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„No Harrowby, the common names we call things by do not matter — except to show how very dull we are…“

—  James Branch Cabell, book The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: I have been telling you, from alpha to omega, what is the one great thing the sigil taught me — that everything in life is miraculous. For the sigil taught me that it rests within the power of each of us to awaken at will from a dragging nightmare of life made up of unimportant tasks and tedious useless little habits, to see life as it really is, and to rejoice in its exquisite wonderfulness. If the sigil were proved to be the top of a tomato-can, it would not alter that big fact, nor my fixed faith. No Harrowby, the common names we call things by do not matter — except to show how very dull we are... The Epilogue : Which is the proper ending of all comedies; and heralds, it may be, an afterpiece.

„What really matters is that there is so much faith and love and kindliness which we can share with and provoke in others, and that by cleanly, simple, generous living we approach perfection in the highest and most lovely of all arts. . . . But you, I think, have always comprehended this.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Certain Hour (1916), Context: The Dream, as I now know, is not best served by making parodies of it, and it does not greatly matter after all whether a book be an epic or a directory. What really matters is that there is so much faith and love and kindliness which we can share with and provoke in others, and that by cleanly, simple, generous living we approach perfection in the highest and most lovely of all arts.... But you, I think, have always comprehended this. "Auctorial Induction"

„That was why all art, which strove to make the sensations of a moment soul-satisfying, was dimly felt to be irreligious. For art performed what religion only promised.“

—  James Branch Cabell, book The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: To-day alone was real. Never was man brought into contact with reality save through the evanescent emotions and sensations of that single moment, that infinitesimal fraction of a second, which was passing now — and it was in the insignificance of this moment, precisely, that religious persons must believe. So ran the teachings of all dead and lingering faiths alike. Here was, perhaps, only another instance of mankind's abhorrence of actualities; and man's quaint dislike of facing reality was here disguised as a high moral principle. That was why all art, which strove to make the sensations of a moment soul-satisfying, was dimly felt to be irreligious. For art performed what religion only promised. Ch. 26 : "Epper Si Muove"

„Never fear! He shall be, in every shape and attribute.“

—  James Branch Cabell, book Figures of Earth
Figures of Earth (1921), Context: Manuel gave it up, and shrugged. Well, let us conquer as we may, so that God be on our side. Miramon replied: "Never fear! He shall be, in every shape and attribute." Manuel, in Ch. XXXII : The Redemption of Poictesme

„Jurgen returned again toward Barathum; and, whether or not it was a coincidence, Jurgen met precisely the vampire of whom he had inveigled his father into thinking.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Jurgen (1919), Context: Jurgen returned again toward Barathum; and, whether or not it was a coincidence, Jurgen met precisely the vampire of whom he had inveigled his father into thinking. She was the most seductively beautiful creature that it would be possible for Jurgen's father or any other man to imagine: and her clothes were orange-colored, for a reason sufficiently well known in Hell, and were embroidered everywhere with green fig–leaves. "A good morning to you, madame," says Jurgen, "and whither are you going?" "Why, to no place at all, good youth. For this is my vacation, granted yearly by the Law of Kalki—" "And who is Kalki, madame?" "Nobody as yet: but he will come as a stallion. Meanwhile his Law precedes him, so that I am spending my vacation peacefully in Hell, with none of my ordinary annoyances to bother me." "And what, madame, can they be?" "Why, you must understand that it is little rest a vampire gets on earth, with so many fine young fellows like yourself going about everywhere eager to be destroyed." Ch. 37 : Invention of the Lovely Vampire http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/CABELL/ch37.htm

„The Wardens without fail arrange what we call — gravely, too — "some natural explanation."“

—  James Branch Cabell, book The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: The Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, I suspect — windows which face on other worlds than ours: and They permit this-or-that man to peer out fleetingly, perhaps, just for the joke's sake; since always They humorously contrive matters so this man shall never be able to convince his fellows of what he has seen or of the fact that he was granted any peep at all. The Wardens without fail arrange what we call — gravely, too — "some natural explanation." Ch. 40 : Which Mr. Flaherty Does Not Quite Explain

„The Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, I suspect — windows which face on other worlds than ours:“

—  James Branch Cabell, book The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: The Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, I suspect — windows which face on other worlds than ours: and They permit this-or-that man to peer out fleetingly, perhaps, just for the joke's sake; since always They humorously contrive matters so this man shall never be able to convince his fellows of what he has seen or of the fact that he was granted any peep at all. The Wardens without fail arrange what we call — gravely, too — "some natural explanation." Ch. 40 : Which Mr. Flaherty Does Not Quite Explain

„The purblind majority quite honestly believed that literature was meant to mimic human life, and that it did so.“

—  James Branch Cabell, book The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: The purblind majority quite honestly believed that literature was meant to mimic human life, and that it did so. And in consequence, their love-affairs, their maxims, their so-called natural ties and instincts, and above all, their wickedness, became just so many bungling plagiarisms from something they had read, in a novel or a Bible or a poem or a newspaper. People progressed from the kindergarten to the cemetery assuming that their emotion at every crisis was what books taught them was the appropriate emotion, and without noticing that it was in reality something quite different. Human life was a distorting tarnished mirror held up to literature: this much at least of Wilde's old paradox — that life mimicked art — was indisputable. Human life, very clumsily, tried to reproduce the printed word. Ch. 27 : Evolution of a Vestryman

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„They of Poictesme narrate that in the old days when miracles were as common as fruit pies, young Manuel was a swineherd, living modestly in attendance upon the miller's pigs.“

—  James Branch Cabell, book Figures of Earth
Figures of Earth (1921), Context: They of Poictesme narrate that in the old days when miracles were as common as fruit pies, young Manuel was a swineherd, living modestly in attendance upon the miller's pigs. They tell also that Manuel was content enough: he knew not of the fate which was reserved for him. Ch. I : How Manuel Left the Mire

„Thus will the traveller return — by and by — to the place of his starting; the legend of the second coming of the Redeemer will be justified, in, at all events, my lesser world; and the tale to Manuel's life will have come again, as it did once beside the pool of Haranton, full circle.“

—  James Branch Cabell, book The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: It is true I have not told you everything. Why should I? No Author ever does.... With Felix Kennaston — or, if you prefer it so, with Horvendile, — rests safe this secret and peculiar knowledge as to how the life of Manuel may yet repair to it's first home after some seven centuries of exile. Thus will the traveller return — by and by — to the place of his starting; the legend of the second coming of the Redeemer will be justified, in, at all events, my lesser world; and the tale to Manuel's life will have come again, as it did once beside the pool of Haranton, full circle. The Epilogue : Which is the proper ending of all comedies; and heralds, it may be, an afterpiece.

„Well, let us conquer as we may, so that God be on our side.“

—  James Branch Cabell, book Figures of Earth
Figures of Earth (1921), Context: Manuel gave it up, and shrugged. Well, let us conquer as we may, so that God be on our side. Miramon replied: "Never fear! He shall be, in every shape and attribute." Manuel, in Ch. XXXII : The Redemption of Poictesme

„I am quite content, in this Comedy of Appearances, to follow the old romancers' lead.“

—  James Branch Cabell, book Figures of Earth
Figures of Earth (1921), Context: I am quite content, in this Comedy of Appearances, to follow the old romancers' lead. "Such and such things were said and done by our great Manuel," they say to us, in effect: "such and such were the appearances, and do you make what you can of them." I say that, too, with the addition that in real life, also, such is the fashion in which we are compelled to deal with all happenings and with all our fellows, whether they wear or lack the gaudy name of heroism. "To Sinclair Lewis : A Foreword"

„Life is a pageant that passes very quickly, going hastily from one darkness to another darkness with only ignes fatui to guide; and there is no sense in it. I learned that, Kerin, without moiling over books.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Silver Stallion (1926), Context: Life is a pageant that passes very quickly, going hastily from one darkness to another darkness with only ignes fatui to guide; and there is no sense in it. I learned that, Kerin, without moiling over books. But life is a fine ardent spectacle; and I have loved the actors in it: and I have loved their youth and high-heartedness, and their ungrounded faiths, and their queer dreams, my Kerin, about their own importance and about the greatness of the destiny that awaited them, — while you were piddling after, of all things, the truth! Saraïde, in Book Seven : What Saraïde Wanted, Ch. XLVII : Economics of Saraïde

„At the gate of the garden, beside the lingham post which stood there in eternal erection, sat a boy who was diverting himself by whittling, with a small green-handled knife, a bit of cedar-wood into the quaint shaping which the post had.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Way of Ecben (1929), Context: At the gate of the garden, beside the lingham post which stood there in eternal erection, sat a boy who was diverting himself by whittling, with a small green-handled knife, a bit of cedar-wood into the quaint shaping which the post had. His hair was darkly red: and now, as he regarded Alfgar with brown and wide-set eyes, the face of this boy was humorously grave, and he nodded now, as the complacent artist nods who looks upon his advancing work and finds all to be near his wishes. Ch. 13 : What a Boy Thought

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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