Zitate von James Branch Cabell

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James Branch Cabell

Geburtstag: 14. April 1879
Todesdatum: 5. Mai 1958

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James Branch Cabell war ein amerikanischer Autor phantastischer Romane. Eine zentrale Stellung nimmt dabei der in dem fiktiven, im Süden Frankreichs lokalisierten Land von Poictesme angesiedelte Romanzyklus Biography of the Life of Manuel ein .

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Zitate James Branch Cabell

„The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label.“

—  James Branch Cabell, The Silver Stallion
The Silver Stallion (1926), Context: Yet creeds mean very little... The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label. Coth, in Book Four : Coth at Porutsa, Ch. XXVI : The Realist in Defeat

„Who. you ask, is this fellow? — What matter names?
He is only a scribbler who is content.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Certain Hour (1916), Context: Thus he labors, and loudly they jeer at him; — That is, when they remember he still exists. Who. you ask, is this fellow? — What matter names? He is only a scribbler who is content. "Auctorial Induction"

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„If you have been yourself you cannot reasonably be punished, but if you have been somebody else you will find that this is not permitted.“

—  James Branch Cabell, buch Figures of Earth
Figures of Earth (1921), Context: "Now we must ford these shadowy waters," said Grandfather Death, "in part because your destiny is on the other side, and in part because by the contact of these waters all your memories will be washed away from you. And that is requisite to your destiny." "But what is my destiny?" "It is that of all loving creatures, Count Manuel. If you have been yourself you cannot reasonably be punished, but if you have been somebody else you will find that this is not permitted." "That is a dark saying, only too well suited to this doubtful place, and I do not understand you." "No," replied Grandfather Death, "but that does not matter." Ch. XL : Colophon: Da Capo

„That was why all art, which strove to make the sensations of a moment soul-satisfying, was dimly felt to be irreligious. For art performed what religion only promised.“

—  James Branch Cabell, buch The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: To-day alone was real. Never was man brought into contact with reality save through the evanescent emotions and sensations of that single moment, that infinitesimal fraction of a second, which was passing now — and it was in the insignificance of this moment, precisely, that religious persons must believe. So ran the teachings of all dead and lingering faiths alike. Here was, perhaps, only another instance of mankind's abhorrence of actualities; and man's quaint dislike of facing reality was here disguised as a high moral principle. That was why all art, which strove to make the sensations of a moment soul-satisfying, was dimly felt to be irreligious. For art performed what religion only promised. Ch. 26 : "Epper Si Muove"

„The Wardens without fail arrange what we call — gravely, too — "some natural explanation."“

—  James Branch Cabell, buch The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: The Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, I suspect — windows which face on other worlds than ours: and They permit this-or-that man to peer out fleetingly, perhaps, just for the joke's sake; since always They humorously contrive matters so this man shall never be able to convince his fellows of what he has seen or of the fact that he was granted any peep at all. The Wardens without fail arrange what we call — gravely, too — "some natural explanation." Ch. 40 : Which Mr. Flaherty Does Not Quite Explain

„These young people were getting a calm and temperate, but a positive, gratification out of being virtuous.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Silver Stallion (1926), Context: These young people were getting a calm and temperate, but a positive, gratification out of being virtuous. There must, then, lurk somewhere deep hidden in humanity a certain trend to perverse delight in thus denying and curbing its own human appetites. And since the comparatively intelligent and unregenerate persons were all profiting by their fellows' increased forbearance, altogether everybody was reaping benefit. This damnable new generation was, because of its insane aspiring, happier than its fathers had been under the reign of candor and common sense. Book Five : "Mundus Vult Decepi", Ch. XXIX : The Grumbler's Progress

„I fight against the gluttony of time with so many very amusing weapons — with gestures and with three attitudes and with charming phrases; with tears and with tinsel, and with sugar-coated pills, and with platitudes slightly regilded.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Way of Ecben (1929), Context: I fight against the gluttony of time with so many very amusing weapons — with gestures and with three attitudes and with charming phrases; with tears and with tinsel, and with sugar-coated pills, and with platitudes slightly regilded. Yes, and I fight him also with little mirrors wherein gleam confusedly the corruptions of lust, and ruddy loyalty, and a bit of moonshine, and the pure diamond of the heart's desire, and the opal cloudings of human compromise: but, above all, I fight that ravening dotard with the strength of my own folly. Horvendile, in Ch. 13 : What a Boy Thought

„The insect looked at Jurgen, and its pincers rose erect in horror.“

—  James Branch Cabell
The Judging of Jurgen (1920), Context: The insect looked at Jurgen, and its pincers rose erect in horror. The bug cried to the three judges, — Now, by St. Anthony! this Jurgen must forthwith be relegated to limbo, for he is offensive and lewd and lascivious and indecent.… — And how can that be?… says Jurgen. — You are offensive,… the bug replied, — because this page has a sword which I chose to say is not a sword. You are lewd because that page has a lance which I prefer to think is not a lance. You are lascivious because yonder page has a staff which I elect to declare is not a staff. And finally, you are indecent for reasons of which a description would be objectionable to me, and which therefore I must decline to reveal to anybody.…

„So Florimel extinguished the candle, with a good-will that delighted Jurgen.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Jurgen (1919), Context: Let us extinguish this candle says Jurgen, "for I have seen so many flames to-day that my eyes are tired." So Florimel extinguished the candle, with a good-will that delighted Jurgen. And now they were in utter darkness, and in the dark nobody can see what is happening. But that Florimel now trusted Jurgen and his Noumarian claims was evinced by her very first remark. "I was in the beginning suspicious of your majesty," said Florimel, "because I had always heard that every emperor carried a magnificent sceptre, and you then displayed nothing of the sort. But now, somehow, I do not doubt you any longer. And of what is your majesty thinking?" "Why, I was reflecting, my dear," says Jurgen, "that my father imagines things very satisfactorily." Ch. 37 : Invention of the Lovely Vampire

„To-day alone was real. Never was man brought into contact with reality save through the evanescent emotions and sensations of that single moment, that infinitesimal fraction of a second, which was passing now — and it was in the insignificance of this moment, precisely, that religious persons must believe.“

—  James Branch Cabell, buch The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: To-day alone was real. Never was man brought into contact with reality save through the evanescent emotions and sensations of that single moment, that infinitesimal fraction of a second, which was passing now — and it was in the insignificance of this moment, precisely, that religious persons must believe. So ran the teachings of all dead and lingering faiths alike. Here was, perhaps, only another instance of mankind's abhorrence of actualities; and man's quaint dislike of facing reality was here disguised as a high moral principle. That was why all art, which strove to make the sensations of a moment soul-satisfying, was dimly felt to be irreligious. For art performed what religion only promised. Ch. 26 : "Epper Si Muove"

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„The transfiguring touch was to come, it seemed from a girl's lips; but it had not; he kissed, and life remained uncharmed.“

—  James Branch Cabell, buch The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: The transfiguring touch was to come, it seemed from a girl's lips; but it had not; he kissed, and life remained uncharmed.... at the bottom of his heart, he was still expecting the transfiguring touch to come, some day, from something he was to obtain or do, perhaps to-morrow.... Then he had by accident found out the sigil's power... Ch. 27 : Evolution of a Vestryman

„I quite fixedly believe the Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, that face on other worlds than ours.“

—  James Branch Cabell, buch The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: I quite fixedly believe the Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, that face on other worlds than ours. And some of us, I think, once in a while get a peep through these windows. But we are not permitted to get a long peep, or an unobstructed peep, nor very certainly, are we permitted to see all there is — out yonder. The fatal fault, sir, of your theorizing is that it is too complete. It aims to throw light upon the universe, and therefore is self-evidently moonshine. The Wardens of Earth do not desire that we should understand the universe, Mr. Kennaston; it is part of Their appointed task to insure that we never do; and because of Their efficiency every notion that any man, dead, living, or unborn, might form as to the universe will necessarily prove wrong. Ch 28 : The Shallowest Sort of Mysticism

„James Branch Cabell made this book so that he who wills may read the story of mans eternally unsatisfied hunger in search of beauty.“

—  James Branch Cabell, buch The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: James Branch Cabell made this book so that he who wills may read the story of mans eternally unsatisfied hunger in search of beauty. Ettarre stays inaccessible always and her lovliness is his to look on only in his dreams. All men she must evade at the last and many ar the ways of her elusion. Afterpiece : a hidden inscription on the Sigil of Scoteia (and so spelled, in a peculiar modification of Roman capital letters)

„I am Manuel. I have lived in the loneliness which is common to all men, but the difference is that I have known it.“

—  James Branch Cabell, buch Figures of Earth
Figures of Earth (1921), Context: I am Manuel. I have lived in the loneliness which is common to all men, but the difference is that I have known it. Now it is necessary for me, as it is necessary for all men, to die in this same loneliness, and I know that there is no help for it. Manuel, in Ch. XXXIX : The Passing of Manuel

„The Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, I suspect — windows which face on other worlds than ours:“

—  James Branch Cabell, buch The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: The Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, I suspect — windows which face on other worlds than ours: and They permit this-or-that man to peer out fleetingly, perhaps, just for the joke's sake; since always They humorously contrive matters so this man shall never be able to convince his fellows of what he has seen or of the fact that he was granted any peep at all. The Wardens without fail arrange what we call — gravely, too — "some natural explanation." Ch. 40 : Which Mr. Flaherty Does Not Quite Explain

„The purblind majority quite honestly believed that literature was meant to mimic human life, and that it did so.“

—  James Branch Cabell, buch The Cream of the Jest
The Cream of the Jest (1917), Context: The purblind majority quite honestly believed that literature was meant to mimic human life, and that it did so. And in consequence, their love-affairs, their maxims, their so-called natural ties and instincts, and above all, their wickedness, became just so many bungling plagiarisms from something they had read, in a novel or a Bible or a poem or a newspaper. People progressed from the kindergarten to the cemetery assuming that their emotion at every crisis was what books taught them was the appropriate emotion, and without noticing that it was in reality something quite different. Human life was a distorting tarnished mirror held up to literature: this much at least of Wilde's old paradox — that life mimicked art — was indisputable. Human life, very clumsily, tried to reproduce the printed word. Ch. 27 : Evolution of a Vestryman

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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