„He is swift to deride all the world outside, and blind to the world within:
So that man may make sport and amuse Us, in battling for phrases or pelf,
Now that each may know what forebodeth woe to his neighbor, and not to himself.“

"Ballad of the Double-Soul"
The Certain Hour (1916)
Kontext: In the beginning the Gods made man, and fashioned the sky and the sea,
And the earth's fair face for man's dwelling-place, and this was the Gods' decree: — "Lo, We have given to man five wits: he discerneth folly and sin;
He is swift to deride all the world outside, and blind to the world within:
So that man may make sport and amuse Us, in battling for phrases or pelf,
Now that each may know what forebodeth woe to his neighbor, and not to himself."

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James Branch Cabell Foto
James Branch Cabell
englischer Fantasy-Schriftsteller 1879 - 1958

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François-René de Chateaubriand Foto
George D. Herron Foto

„All that is good in civilization must be for the equal use of all, in order that each man may make his life most worthwhile to the common life and to himself.“

—  George D. Herron American clergyman, writer and activist 1862 - 1925

Quelle: Between Caesar and Jesus (1899), p. 15

Julian of Norwich Foto
Nikolai Gogol Foto

„As it is so strangely ordained in this world, what is amusing will turn into being gloomy, if you stand too long before it, and then God knows what ideas may not stray into the mind“

—  Nikolai Gogol, buch Dead Souls

Vol. I, ch. 3
Dead Souls (1842)
Kontext: As it is so strangely ordained in this world, what is amusing will turn into being gloomy, if you stand too long before it, and then God knows what ideas may not stray into the mind... Why is it that even in moments of unthinking, careless gaiety a different and strange mood comes upon one?

Erich Fromm Foto

„The existential split in man would be unbearable could he not establish a sense of unity within himself and with the natural and human world outside.“

—  Erich Fromm German social psychologist and psychoanalyst 1900 - 1980

Quelle: The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness (1973), p. 262

Napoleon I of France Foto

„The genius continually discovers fate, and the more profound the genius, the more profound the discovery of fate. To spiritlessness, this is naturally foolishness, but in actuality it is greatness, because no man is born with the idea of providence, and those who think that one acquires it gradually though education are greatly mistaken, although I do not thereby deny the significance of education. Not until sin is reached is providence posited. Therefore the genius has an enormous struggle to reach providence. If he does not reach it, truly he becomes a subject for the study of fate. The genius is an omnipotent Ansich [in itself] which as such would rock the whole world. For the sake of order, another figure appears along with him, namely fate. Fate is nothing. It is the genius himself who discovers it, and the more profound the genius, the more profoundly he discovers fate, because that figure is merely the anticipation of providence. If he continues to be merely a genius and turns outward, he will accomplish astonishing things; nevertheless, he will always succumb to fate, if not outwardly, so that it is tangible and visible to all, then inwardly. Therefore, a genius-existence is always like a fairy tale if in the deepest sense the genius does not turn inward into himself. The genius is able to do all things, and yet he is dependent upon an insignificance that no one comprehends, an insignificance upon which the genius himself by his omnipotence bestows omnipotent significance. Therefore, a second lieutenant, if he is a genius, is able to become an emperor and change the world, so that there becomes one empire and one emperor. But therefore, too, the army may be drawn up for battle, the conditions for the battle absolutely favorable, and yet in the next moment wasted; a kingdom of heroes may plead that the order for battle be given-but he cannot; he must wait for the fourteenth of June. And why? Because that was the date of the battle of Marengo. So all things may be in readiness, he himself stands before the legions, waiting only for the sun to rise in order to announce the time for the oration that will electrify the soldiers, and the sun may rise more glorious than ever, an inspiring and inflaming sight for all, only not for him, because the sun did not rise as glorious as this at Austerlitz, and only the sun of Austerlitz gives victory and inspiration. Thus, the inexplicable passion with which such a one may often rage against an entirely insignificant man, when otherwise he may show humanity and kindness even toward his enemies. Yes, woe unto the man, woe unto the woman, woe unto the innocent child, woe unto the beast of the field, woe unto the bird whose flight, woe unto the tree whose branch comes in his way at the moment he is to interpret his omen.“

—  Napoleon I of France French general, First Consul and later Emperor of the French 1769 - 1821

Søren Kierkegaard The Concept of Anxiety, Nichol p. 98-100 (1844)
About

Robert H. Jackson Foto

„No longer may the head of a state consider himself outside of the law, and impose inhuman acts on the peoples of the world.“

—  Robert H. Jackson American judge 1892 - 1954

Regarding the Nuremberg Trials
New York Times Obituary (October 10, 1954)

Stanisław Lem Foto
Jean Paul Sartre Foto
Eli Siegel Foto

„There is a disposition in every person to think he will be for himself by making less of the outside world.“

—  Eli Siegel Latvian-American poet, philosopher 1902 - 1978

Self and World (1957)

Jonathan Haidt Foto
Thomas Carlyle Foto
Robert G. Ingersoll Foto

„But they say he “permits” it. What for? So that we may have freedom of choice. What for? So that God may find, I suppose, who are good and who are bad. Did he not know that when he made us? Did he not know exactly just what he was making?“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899

Orthodoxy (1884)
Kontext: How do they answer all this? They say that God “permits” it. What would you say to me if I stood by and saw a ruffian beat out the brains of a child, when I had full and perfect power to prevent it? You would say truthfully that I was as bad as the murderer. Is it possible for this God to prevent it? Then, if he does not he is a fiend; he is no god. But they say he “permits” it. What for? So that we may have freedom of choice. What for? So that God may find, I suppose, who are good and who are bad. Did he not know that when he made us? Did he not know exactly just what he was making?

Taylor Caldwell Foto
Frithjof Schuon Foto

„Beauty, whatever use man may make of it, belongs fundamentally to its Creator, who through it projects into the world of appearances something of His being.“

—  Frithjof Schuon Swiss philosopher 1907 - 1998

[2019, Esoterism as Principle and as Way, World Wisdom, 190, 978-1-93659765-9]
God, Beauty

William Greenough Thayer Shedd Foto
Albert Einstein Foto

„Man tries to make for himself in the fashion that suits him best a simplified and intelligible picture of the world; he then tries to some extent to substitute this cosmos of his for the world of experience, and thus to overcome it. This is what the painter, the poet, the speculative philosopher, and the natural scientist do, each in his own fashion.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

Variant translation: One of the strongest motives that lead men to art and science is escape from everyday life with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness, from the fetters of one's own ever-shifting desires. A finely tempered nature longs to escape from the personal life into the world of objective perception and thought. With this negative motive goes a positive one. Man seeks to form for himself, in whatever manner is suitable for him, a simplified and lucid image of the world, and so to overcome the world of experience by striving to replace it to some extent by this image. This is what the painter does, and the poet, the speculative philosopher, the natural scientist, each in his own way. Into this image and its formation, he places the center of gravity of his emotional life, in order to attain the peace and serenity that he cannot find within the narrow confines of swirling personal experience.
As quoted in The Professor, the Institute, and DNA (1976) by Rene Dubos; also in The Great Influenza (2004) by John M. Barry
1910s, Principles of Research (1918)
Kontext: Man tries to make for himself in the fashion that suits him best a simplified and intelligible picture of the world; he then tries to some extent to substitute this cosmos of his for the world of experience, and thus to overcome it. This is what the painter, the poet, the speculative philosopher, and the natural scientist do, each in his own fashion. Each makes this cosmos and its construction the pivot of his emotional life, in order to find in this way the peace and security which he cannot find in the narrow whirlpool of personal experience.

William Least Heat-Moon Foto
Victor Hugo Foto

„What makes night within us may leave stars.“

—  Victor Hugo French poet, novelist, and dramatist 1802 - 1885

Variante: Whatever causes night in our souls may leave stars.
Quelle: Ninety-Three

Anaïs Nin Foto

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