Zitate von Dinah Maria Mulock

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Dinah Maria Mulock

Geburtstag: 20. April 1826
Todesdatum: 12. Oktober 1887

Dinah Maria Mulock war englische Schriftstellerin.

Zitate Dinah Maria Mulock

„Nevertheless, taking life as a whole, believing that it consists not in what we have, but in our power of enjoying the same“

—  Dinah Craik
A Woman's Thoughts About Women (1858), Context: Nevertheless, taking life as a whole, believing that it consists not in what we have, but in our power of enjoying the same; that there are in it things nobler and dearer than ease, plenty, or freedom from care — nay, even than existence itself; surely it is not Quixotism, but common-sense and Christianity, to protest that love is better than outside show, labour than indolence, virtue than mere respectability

„Do your neighbour good by all means in your power, moral as well as physical — by kindness, by patience, by unflinching resistance against every outward evil — by the silent preaching of your own contrary life.“

—  Dinah Craik
A Woman's Thoughts About Women (1858), Context: Do your neighbour good by all means in your power, moral as well as physical — by kindness, by patience, by unflinching resistance against every outward evil — by the silent preaching of your own contrary life. But if the only good you can do him is by talking at him, or about him — nay, even to him, if it be in a self-satisfied, super-virtuous style — such as I earnestly hope the present writer is not doing — you had much better leave him alone. Ch. 8

„Wist ye not
That I must be about my Father's business?“

—  Dinah Craik
Poems (1866), Our Father's Business, Context: O infinitely human, yet divine! Half clinging childlike to the mother found, Yet half repelling — as the soft eyes say, "How is it that ye sought me? Wist ye not That I must be about my Father's business?"

„Let Thy wide hand
Gather us all — with none left out (O God!
Leave Thou out none!) from the east and from the west.“

—  Dinah Craik
Context: Awakener, come! Fiing wide the gate of an eternal year, The April of that glad new heavens and earth Which shall grow out of these, as spring-tide grows Slow out of winter's breast. Let Thy wide hand Gather us all — with none left out (O God! Leave Thou out none!) from the east and from the west. Loose Thou our burdens: heal our sicknesses; Give us one heart, one tongue, one faith, one love. In Thy great Oneness made complete and strong — To do Thy work throughout the happy world — Thy world, All-merciful, Thy perfect world. "April", in Poems (1859)

„We too should be about our father's business —
O Christ, hear us!“

—  Dinah Craik
Poems (1866), Our Father's Business, Context: All that we know of Thee, or knowing not Love only, waiting till the perfect time When we shall know even as we are known — O Thou Child Jesus, Thou dost seem to say By the soft silence of these heavenly eyes (That rose out of the depths of nothingness Upon this limner's reverent soul and hand) We too should be about our father's business — O Christ, hear us!

„I fear, the inevitable conclusion we must all come to is, that in the world happiness is quite indefinable. We can no more grasp it than we can grasp the sun in the sky or the moon in the water.“

—  Dinah Craik
A Woman's Thoughts About Women (1858), Context: I fear, the inevitable conclusion we must all come to is, that in the world happiness is quite indefinable. We can no more grasp it than we can grasp the sun in the sky or the moon in the water. We can feel it interpenetrating our whole being with warmth and strength; we can see it in a pale reflection shining elsewhere; or in its total absence, we, walking in darkness, learn to appreciate what it is by what it is not. Ch. 10

„Thus King Dolor's reign passed, year after year, long and prosperous. Whether he was happy — "as happy as a king" — is a question no human being can decide. But I think he was, because he had the power of making everybody about him happy, and did it too;“

—  Dinah Craik, buch The Little Lame Prince and his Travelling Cloak
The Little Lame Prince and his Travelling Cloak (1875), Context: Thus King Dolor's reign passed, year after year, long and prosperous. Whether he was happy — "as happy as a king" — is a question no human being can decide. But I think he was, because he had the power of making everybody about him happy, and did it too; also because he was his godmother's godson, and could shut himself up with her whenever he liked, in that quiet little room in view of the Beautiful Mountains, which nobody else ever saw or cared to see. They were too far off, and the city lay so low. But there they were, all the time. No change ever came to them; and I think, at any day throughout his long reign, the King would sooner have lost his crown than have lost sight of the Beautiful Mountains. Ch 10

„Love, the master, goes in and out
Of his goodly chambers with song and shout,
Just as he please — just as he please.“

—  Dinah Craik
Poems (1866), Context: Mine to the core of the heart, my beauty! Mine, all mine, and for love, not duty: Love given willingly, full and free, Love for love's sake — as mine to thee. Duty's a slave that keeps the keys, But Love, the master, goes in and out Of his goodly chambers with song and shout, Just as he please — just as he please. "Plighted"

„A finished life — a life which has made the best of all the materials granted to it, and through which, be its web dark or bright, its pattern clear or clouded, can now be traced plainly the hand of the Great Designer; surely this is worth living for?“

—  Dinah Craik
A Woman's Thoughts About Women (1858), Context: A finished life — a life which has made the best of all the materials granted to it, and through which, be its web dark or bright, its pattern clear or clouded, can now be traced plainly the hand of the Great Designer; surely this is worth living for? And though at its end it may be somewhat lonely; though a servant's and not a daughter's arm may guide the failing step; though most likely it will be strangers only who come about the dying bed, close the eyes that no husband ever kissed, and draw the shroud kindly over the poor withered breast where no child's head has ever lain; still, such a life is not to be pitied, for it is a completed life. It has fulfilled its appointed course, and returns to the Giver of all breath, pure as He gave it. Nor will He forget it when He counteth up His jewels. Ch 12

„Down in the deep, up in the sky,
I see them always, far or nigh,
And I shall see them till I die —“

—  Dinah Craik
Context: p>Down in the deep, up in the sky, I see them always, far or nigh, And I shall see them till I die —The old familiar faces.</p "Magnus and Morna", in Thirty Years, Poems New and Old (1880)

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„And all day long, so close and near,
As in a mystic dream I hear
Their gentle accents kind and dear —
The old familiar voices.“

—  Dinah Craik
Context: And all day long, so close and near, As in a mystic dream I hear Their gentle accents kind and dear — The old familiar voices. They have no sound that I can reach — But silence sweeter is than speech; "Magnus and Morna", in Thirty Years, Poems New and Old (1880)

„O Thou that openest, and no man shuts;
That shut'st, and no man opens — Thee we wait!“

—  Dinah Craik
Context: p>The irrevocable Hand That opes the year's fair gate, doth ope and shut The portals of our earthly destinies; We walk through blindfold, and the noiseless doors Close after us, for ever.Pause, my soul, On these strange words — for ever — whose large sound Breaks flood-like, drowning all the petty noise Our human moans make on the shores of Time. O Thou that openest, and no man shuts; That shut'st, and no man opens — Thee we wait!</p "April", in Poems (1859)

„Happiness is not an end — it is only a means, and adjunct, a consequence.“

—  Dinah Craik
A Woman's Thoughts About Women (1858), Context: Happiness is not an end — it is only a means, and adjunct, a consequence. The Omnipotent Himself could never be supposed by any, save those who out of their own human selfishness construct the attributes of Divinity, to be absorbed throughout eternity in the contemplation of His own ineffable bliss, were it not identical with His ineffable goodness and love. Ch. 10

„Gossip, public, private, social — to fight against it either by word or pen seems, after all, like fighting with shadows.“

—  Dinah Craik
A Woman's Thoughts About Women (1858), Context: Gossip, public, private, social — to fight against it either by word or pen seems, after all, like fighting with shadows. Everybody laughs at it, protests against it, blames and despises it; yet everybody does it, or at least encourages others in it: quite innocently, unconsciously, in such a small, harmless fashion — yet we do it. We must talk about something, and it is not all of us who can find a rational topic of conversation, or discuss it when found. Ch. 8

„I think, at any day throughout his long reign, the King would sooner have lost his crown than have lost sight of the Beautiful Mountains.“

—  Dinah Craik, buch The Little Lame Prince and his Travelling Cloak
The Little Lame Prince and his Travelling Cloak (1875), Context: Thus King Dolor's reign passed, year after year, long and prosperous. Whether he was happy — "as happy as a king" — is a question no human being can decide. But I think he was, because he had the power of making everybody about him happy, and did it too; also because he was his godmother's godson, and could shut himself up with her whenever he liked, in that quiet little room in view of the Beautiful Mountains, which nobody else ever saw or cared to see. They were too far off, and the city lay so low. But there they were, all the time. No change ever came to them; and I think, at any day throughout his long reign, the King would sooner have lost his crown than have lost sight of the Beautiful Mountains. Ch 10

„The irrevocable Hand
That opes the year's fair gate, doth ope and shut
The portals of our earthly destinies;
We walk through blindfold, and the noiseless doors
Close after us, for ever.“

—  Dinah Craik
Context: p>The irrevocable Hand That opes the year's fair gate, doth ope and shut The portals of our earthly destinies; We walk through blindfold, and the noiseless doors Close after us, for ever.Pause, my soul, On these strange words — for ever — whose large sound Breaks flood-like, drowning all the petty noise Our human moans make on the shores of Time. O Thou that openest, and no man shuts; That shut'st, and no man opens — Thee we wait!</p "April", in Poems (1859)

„Let every one of us cultivate, in every word that issues from our mouth, absolute truth.“

—  Dinah Craik
A Woman's Thoughts About Women (1858), Context: Let every one of us cultivate, in every word that issues from our mouth, absolute truth. I say cultivate, because to very few people — as may be noticed of most young children — does truth, this rigid, literal veracity, come by nature. To many, even who love it and prize it dearly in others, it comes only after the self-control, watchfulness, and bitter experience of years. Ch. 8

„Oh, the comfort — the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person — having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words, but pouring them all right out, just as they are, chaff and grain together; certain that a faithful hand will take and sift them, keep what is worth keeping, and then with the breath of kindness blow the rest away.“

—  Dinah Craik
A Life for a Life (1859), Context: Thus ended our little talk: yet it left a pleasant impression. True, the subject was strange enough; my sisters might have been shocked at it; and at my freedom in asking and giving opinions. But oh! the blessing it is to have a friend to whom one can speak fearlessly on any subject; with whom one's deepest as well as one's most foolish thoughts come out simply and safely. Oh, the comfort — the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person — having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words, but pouring them all right out, just as they are, chaff and grain together; certain that a faithful hand will take and sift them, keep what is worth keeping, and then with the breath of kindness blow the rest away. Somebody must have done a good deal of the winnowing business this afternoon; for in the course of it I gave him as much nonsense as any reasonable man could stand... A part of this passage appeared in The Best Loved Poems of the American People (1936) with the title "Friendship":

„Sweet April-time — O cruel April-time!“

—  Dinah Craik
Context: Sweet April-time — O cruel April-time! Year after year returning, with a brow Of promise, and red lips with longing paled, And backward-hidden hands that clutch the joys Of vanished springs, like flowers. "April", in Poems (1859)

„When faith and hope fail, as they do sometimes, we must try charity, which is love in action.“

—  Dinah Craik
Context: When faith and hope fail, as they do sometimes, we must try charity, which is love in action. We must speculate no more on our duty, but simply do it. When we have done it, however blindly, perhaps Heaven will show us why. Christian's Mistake (1865). p. 64

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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