Zitate von Moses Maimonides

Moses Maimonides Foto
3   0

Moses Maimonides

Geburtstag: 30. März 1138
Todesdatum: 13. Dezember 1204

Moses Maimonides war ein jüdischer Philosoph, Rechtsgelehrter und Arzt. Er gilt als bedeutender Gelehrter des Mittelalters und als einer der bedeutendsten jüdischen Gelehrten aller Zeiten.

Moses Maimonides ist die gräzisierte Form des hebräischen Namens Mosche ben Maimon. Er wird auch RaMBaM genannt. Hierbei handelt es sich um ein Akronym für Rabbi Mosche Ben Maimon, רבי משה בן מיימון. Sein arabischer Name lautet Abu 'Imran Musa ibn 'Ubaidallah Maimun al-Kurdubi / أبو عمران موسى بن عبيد الله ميمون القرطبي / Abū ʿImrān Mūsā b.ʿUbaidallāh Maimūn al-Qurṭubī, oder einfach Musa bin Maimun, das arabische Äquivalent seines hebräischen Namens.

Seine Hauptwerke, die Systematisierung des jüdischen Rechts Mischne Tora und das religionsphilosophische Werk Führer der Unschlüssigen, waren ihrer Radikalität wegen lange Zeit heftig umstritten. Daneben hat Maimonides zahlreiche weitere Schriften zur Religion, Philosophie, Medizin und Astronomie hinterlassen.

Photo: Blaisio Ugolino, Rambam Institute / Public domain

Zitate Moses Maimonides

„In addition to the teaching of truths the Law aims at the removal of injustice from mankind.“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Quelle: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.32
Kontext: The chief object of the Law, as has been shown by us, is the teaching of truths; to which the truth of the creatio ex nihilo belongs. It is known that the object of the law of Sabbath is to confirm and to establish this principle, as we have shown in this treatise (Part II. chap. xxxi.) In addition to the teaching of truths the Law aims at the removal of injustice from mankind. We have thus proved that the first laws do not refer to burnt-offering and sacrifice, which are of secondary importance.

„Know that this Universe, in its entirety, is nothing else but one individual being“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part I
Kontext: Know that this Universe, in its entirety, is nothing else but one individual being; that is to say, the outermost heavenly sphere, together with all included therein, is as regards individuality beyond all question a single being like Said and Omar. The variety of its substances—I mean the substances of that sphere and all its component parts—is like the variety of the substances of a human being: just as, e. g., Said is one individual, consisting of various solid substances, such as flesh, bones, sinews of various humours, and of various spiritual elements; in like manner this sphere in its totality is composed of the celestial orbs, the four elements and their combinations; there is no vacuum whatever therein, but the whole space is filled up with matter. Its centre is occupied by the earth, earth is surrounded by water, air encompasses the water, fire envelopes the air, and this again is enveloped by the fifth substance (quintessence). These substances form numerous spheres, one being enclosed within another so that no intermediate empty space, no vacuum, is left. One sphere surrounds and closely joins the other. All the spheres revolve with constant uniformity, without acceleration or retardation; that is to say, each sphere retains its individual nature as regards its velocity and the peculiarity of its motion; it does not move at one time quicker, at another slower. Compared with each other, however, some of the spheres move with less, others with greater velocity. The outermost, all-encompassing sphere, revolves with the greatest speed; it completes its revolution in one day, and causes every thing to participate in its motion, just as every particle of a thing moves when the entire body is in motion; for all existing beings stand in the same relation to that sphere as a part of a thing stands to the whole. These spheres have not a common centre; the centres of some of them are identical with the centre of the Universe, while those of the rest are different from it. Some of the spheres have a motion independent of that of the whole Universe, constantly revolving from East to West, while other spheres move from West to East. The stars contained in those spheres are part of their respective orbits; they are fixed in them, and have no motion of their own, but participating in the motion of the sphere of which they are a part, they themselves appear to move. The entire substance of this revolving fifth element is unlike the substance of those bodies which consist of the other four elements, and are enclosed by the fifth element.<!--pp.288-292 (1881) Tr. Friedlander

„…one should accept the truth from whatever source it proceeds.“

—  Maimónides

Foreword to The Eight Chapters Of Maimonides On Ethics, translated by Joseph I. Gorfinkle, Ph.D. Columbia University Press, New York (1912). Page 35-36. https://archive.org/details/eightchaptersofm00maim
Variante: "Accept the truth from whatever source it comes." Introduction to the Shemonah Peraqim, as quoted in Truth and Compassion: Essays on Judaism and Religion in Memory of Rabbi Dr. Solomon Frank (1983) Edited by Howard Joseph, Jack Nathan Lightstone, and Michael D. Oppenheim, p. 168
Variante: You must accept the truth from whatever source it comes.

„Divine Providence is connected with Divine intellectual influence“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Quelle: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.17
Kontext: Divine Providence is connected with Divine intellectual influence, and the same beings which are benefited by the latter so as to become intellectual, and to comprehend things comprehensible to rational beings, are also under the control of Divine Providence, which examines all their deeds with a view of rewarding or punishing them.... the method of which our mind is incapable of understanding.

„The corporeal element in man is a large screen and partition that prevents him from perfectly perceiving abstract ideals“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Quelle: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.9
Kontext: The corporeal element in man is a large screen and partition that prevents him from perfectly perceiving abstract ideals; this would be the case even if the corporeal element were as pure and superior as the substance of the spheres; how much more must this be the case with our dark and opaque body. However great the exertion of our mind may be to comprehend the Divine Being or any of the ideals, we find a screen and partition between God and us.

„It is of great advantage that man should know his station, and not imagine that the whole universe exists only for him.“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Quelle: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.12
Kontext: It is of great advantage that man should know his station, and not imagine that the whole universe exists only for him. We hold that the universe exists because the Creator wills it so; that mankind is low in rank as compared with the uppermost portion of the universe, viz., with the spheres and the stars; but, as regards the angels, there cannot be any real comparison between man and angels, although man is the highest of all beings on earth; i. e., of all the beings formed of the four elements.

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„Those who observe the nature of the Universe and the commandments of the Law, and know their purpose, see clearly God's mercy and truth in everything; they seek, therefore, that which the Creator intended to be the aim of man, viz., comprehension. Forced also by claims of the body, they seek that which is necessary for the preservation of the body“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Quelle: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.12
Kontext: Those who observe the nature of the Universe and the commandments of the Law, and know their purpose, see clearly God's mercy and truth in everything; they seek, therefore, that which the Creator intended to be the aim of man, viz., comprehension. Forced also by claims of the body, they seek that which is necessary for the preservation of the body, "bread to eat and garment to clothe," and this is very little; but they seek nothing superfluous; with very slight exertion man can obtain it, so long as he is contented with that which is indispensable.

„This book will then be a key admitting to places the gates of which would otherwise be closed. When the gates are opened and men enter, their souls will enjoy repose, their eyes will be gratified, and even their bodies, after all toil and labour, will be refreshed.“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Introduction
Kontext: Having concluded these introductory remarks I proceed to examine those expressions, to the true meaning of which, as apparent from the context, it is necessary to direct your attention. This book will then be a key admitting to places the gates of which would otherwise be closed. When the gates are opened and men enter, their souls will enjoy repose, their eyes will be gratified, and even their bodies, after all toil and labour, will be refreshed.

„To give a full explanation of the mystic passages of the Bible is contrary to the law and to reason; besides, my knowledge of them is based on reasoning, not on divine inspiration“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Introduction
Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III
Kontext: To give a full explanation of the mystic passages of the Bible is contrary to the law and to reason; besides, my knowledge of them is based on reasoning, not on divine inspiration [and is therefore not infallible].... It is... possible that my view is wrong, and that I misunderstand passages referred to.... Those, however, for whom this treatise has been composed, will, on reflecting on it and thoroughly examining each chapter, obtain a clear insight into all that has been clear and intelligible to me. This is the utmost that can be done in treating this subject so to be useful to all without fully explaining it.

„He did not command us to give up and to discontinue all these manners of service, for“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Quelle: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.32
Kontext: The custom which was in those days general among all men, and the general mode of worship in which the Israelites were brought up, consisted in sacrificing animals in those temples which contained certain images to bow down to those images, and to burn incense before them; religious and ascetic persons were in those days the persons that were devoted to the service in the temples erected to the stars... It was in accordance with the wisdom and plan of God, as displayed in the whole Creation, that He did not command us to give up and to discontinue all these manners of service, for to obey such a commandment it would have been contrary to the nature of man, who generally cleaves to that to which he is used... By this Divine plan it was effected that the traces of idolatry were blotted out, and the truly great principle of our faith, the existence and Unity of God, was firmly established; this result was thus obtained without deterring or confusing the minds of the people by the abolition of the service to which they were accustomed and which alone was familiar to them.

„The error of the ignorant goes so far as to say that God's power is insufficient, because he has given to this Universe the properties“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Quelle: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.12
Kontext: The error of the ignorant goes so far as to say that God's power is insufficient, because he has given to this Universe the properties which they imagine cause these great evils, and which do not help all evil-disposed persons to obtain the evil which they seek, and to bring their evil souls to the aim of their desires, though these, as we have shown, are really without limit.

„The same difficulties which he encountered when investigating the subject for himself will attend him when endeavouring to instruct others“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Introduction
Kontext: You must know that if a person, who has attained a certain degree of perfection, wishes to impart to others, either orally or in writing, any portion of the knowledge which he has acquired of these subjects, he is utterly unable to be as systematic and explicit as he could be in a science of which the method is well known. The same difficulties which he encountered when investigating the subject for himself will attend him when endeavouring to instruct others: viz., at one time the explanation will appear lucid, at another time, obscure: this property of the subject appears to remain the same both to the advanced scholar and to the beginner. For this reason, great theological scholars gave instruction in all such matters only by means of metaphors and allegories.

„I do not ascribe to God ignorance of anything or any kind of weakness; I hold that Divine Providence is related and closely connected with the intellect“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Quelle: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.17
Kontext: I do not ascribe to God ignorance of anything or any kind of weakness; I hold that Divine Providence is related and closely connected with the intellect, because Providence can only proceed from an intelligent being, from a being that is itself the most perfect Intellect. Those creatures, therefore, which receive part of that intellectual influence, will become subject to the action of Providence in the same proportion as they are acted upon by the intellect. This theory is in accordance with reason and with the teaching of the Scripture, whilst the other theories previously mentioned either exaggerate Divine Providence of detract from it.

„In accordance with the divine wisdom, genesis can only take place through destruction“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Quelle: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.12
Kontext: In accordance with the divine wisdom, genesis can only take place through destruction, and without destruction of the individual members of the species the species themselves would not exist permanently. Thus the true kindness, and beneficence, and goodness of God is clear.

„Those who are ignorant and perverse in their thought are constantly in trouble and pain, because they cannot get as much of the superfluous things as a certain other person possesses.“

—  Maimónides, buch The Guide for the Perplexed

Quelle: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.12
Kontext: Those who are ignorant and perverse in their thought are constantly in trouble and pain, because they cannot get as much of the superfluous things as a certain other person possesses. They as a rule expose themselves to great dangers... for the purpose of obtaining that which is superfluous and not necessary. When they thus meet with the consequences of the course which they adopt, they complain of the decrees and the judgements of God; they begin to blame the time, and wonder at the want of justice in its changes; that it has not enabled them to acquire great riches... for the purpose of driving themselves to voluptuousness beyond their capacities, as if the whole Universe existed only for the purpose of giving pleasure to these low people.

„When a man reflects on these things, studies all these created beings, from the angels and spheres down to human beings and so on, and realizes the divine wisdom manifested in them all, his love for God will increase, his soul will thirst, his very flesh will yearn to love God.“

—  Maimónides, buch Mishneh Torah

Book 1 (Sefer HaMadda'<!--[sic]-->), 4.12
Mishneh Torah (c. 1180)
Kontext: When a man reflects on these things, studies all these created beings, from the angels and spheres down to human beings and so on, and realizes the divine wisdom manifested in them all, his love for God will increase, his soul will thirst, his very flesh will yearn to love God. He will be filled with fear and trembling, as he becomes conscious of his lowly condition, poverty, and insignificance, and compares himself with any of the great and holy bodies; still more when he compares himself with any one of the pure forms that are incorporeal and have never had association with any corporeal substance. He will then realize that he is a vessel full of shame, dishonor, and reproach, empty and deficient.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Ähnliche Autoren

Anselm von Canterbury Foto
Anselm von Canterbury72
Theologe und Philosoph des Mittelalters
Omar Khayyam Foto
Omar Khayyam24
persischer Mathematiker, Astronom, Philosoph und Dichter
Thomas von Aquin Foto
Thomas von Aquin97
dominikanischer Philosoph und Theologe
Dante Alighieri Foto
Dante Alighieri65
italienischer Dichter und Philosoph
Meister Eckhart Foto
Meister Eckhart9
spätmittelalterlicher Theologe und Philosoph
Saadí Foto
Saadí21
persischer Dichter und Mystiker
Hafes Foto
Hafes7
persischer Dichter
Franz von Assisi Foto
Franz von Assisi81
Ordensgründer und Heiliger der römisch-katholischen Kirche
Dschalal ad-Din al-Rumi Foto
Dschalal ad-Din al-Rumi14
islamischer Mystiker, Begründer des Mevlevi-Derwisch-Ordens
Hildegard von Bingen Foto
Hildegard von Bingen9
deutsche Mystikerin; Verfasserin theologischer und medizini…
Heutige Jubiläen
Alexander Issajewitsch Solschenizyn Foto
Alexander Issajewitsch Solschenizyn26
russischer Schriftsteller, Dramatiker, Historiker und Liter… 1918 - 2008
Colette Foto
Colette8
französische Schriftstellerin, Kabarettistin und Journalist… 1873 - 1954
Lenny Bruce Foto
Lenny Bruce3
US-amerikanischer Stand-up-comedian und Satiriker 1925 - 1966
Gudrun Krämer Foto
Gudrun Krämer2
deutsche Islamwissenschaftlerin 1953
Weitere 53 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Anselm von Canterbury Foto
Anselm von Canterbury72
Theologe und Philosoph des Mittelalters
Omar Khayyam Foto
Omar Khayyam24
persischer Mathematiker, Astronom, Philosoph und Dichter
Thomas von Aquin Foto
Thomas von Aquin97
dominikanischer Philosoph und Theologe
Dante Alighieri Foto
Dante Alighieri65
italienischer Dichter und Philosoph
Meister Eckhart Foto
Meister Eckhart9
spätmittelalterlicher Theologe und Philosoph