Zitate von Lukrez

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Lukrez

Geburtstag: 94 v.Chr
Todesdatum: 55 v.Chr
Andere Namen: Lucretius Carus, Titus Carus Lucretius

Titus Lucretius Carus war ein römischer Dichter und Philosoph in der Tradition des Epikureismus.

Sein wahrscheinlich unvollendetes Werk De rerum natura ist eine der Hauptquellen zur Philosophie Epikurs, die ansonsten nur in Fragmenten überliefert ist.

Zitate Lukrez

„Uns scheint, dass nichts aus nichts geschaffen werden kann.“

—  Lukrez
De Rerum Natura I, 155f; siehe auch: "Denn wir sehen, daß nichts von nichts entstehen kann." Original lat.: "viderimus nil posse creari de nihilo"

„Woraus folgt, dass alles ohne Götter geschieht.“

—  Lukrez
De Rerum Natura I, 158 Original lat.: "quo quaeque modo fiant opera sine divom"

„Denn wir sehen, dass nichts von nichts entstehen kann.“

—  Lukrez
De Rerum Natura II, 287; meist zitiert als "Von nichts kommt nichts" Original lat.: "de nihilo quoniam fieri nihil posse videmus."; meist zitiert als "de/ex nihilo nihil fit" oder "nihil de/ex nihilo fit"

„Therefore death is nothing to us“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Context: Therefore death is nothing to us, it matters not one jot, since the nature of the mind is understood to be mortal. Book III, lines 830–831 (tr. Rouse)

„A little river seems to him, who has never seen a larger river, a mighty stream; and so with other things—a tree, a man—anything appears greatest to him that never knew a greater.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Scilicet et fluvius qui visus maximus ei, Qui non ante aliquem majorem vidit; et ingens Arbor, homoque videtur, et omnia de genere omni Maxima quae vidit quisque, haec ingentia fingit. Book VI, lines 674–677 (quoted in The Essays of Michel de Montaigne, tr. W. C. Hazlitt)

„But if one should guide his life by true principles, man's greatest riches is to live on a little with contented mind; for a little is never lacking.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Quod siquis vera vitam ratione gubernet, divitiae grandes homini sunt vivere parvo aequo animo; neque enim est umquam penuria parvi. Book V, lines 1117–1119 (tr. Rouse)

„Yes, to seek power that's vain and never granted
and for it to suffer hardship and endless pain:
this is to heave and strain to push uphill
a boulder, that still from the very top rolls back
and bounds and bounces down to the bare, broad field.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Nam petere imperium quod inanest nec datur umquam, atque in eo semper durum sufferre laborem, hoc est adverso nixantem trudere monte saxa quod tamen e summo iam vertice rursum volvitur et plani raptim petit aequora campi. Book III, lines 998–1002 (tr. Frank O. Copley)

„So potent was Religion in persuading to do wrong.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Tantum religio potuit suadere malorum. Book I, line 101 (tr. Alicia Stallings) H. A. J. Munro's translation: So great the evils to which religion could prompt! W. H. D. Rouse's translation: So potent was Superstition in persuading to evil deeds.

„Pleasant it is, when over a great sea the winds trouble the waters, to gaze from shore upon another's great tribulation: not because any man's troubles are a delectable joy, but because to perceive from what ills you are free yourself is pleasant.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Suave mari magno turbantibus aequora ventis e terra magnum alterius spectare laborem; non quia vexari quemquamst jucunda voluptas, sed quibus ipse malis careas quia cernere suave est. Book II, lines 1–4 (tr. Rouse)

„And yet it is hard to believe that anything
in nature could stand revealed as solid matter.
The lightning of heaven goes through the walls of houses,
like shouts and speech; iron glows white in fire;
red-hot rocks are shattered by savage steam;
hard gold is softened and melted down by heat;
chilly brass, defeated by heat, turns liquid;
heat seeps through silver, so does piercing cold;
by custom raising the cup, we feel them both
as water is poured in, drop by drop, above.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Etsi difficiile esse videtur credere quicquam in rebus solido reperiri corpore posse. transit enim fulmen caeli per saepta domorum, clamor ut ad voces; flamen candescit in igni dissiliuntque ferre ferventi saxa vapore. tum labefactatus rigor auri solvitur aestu; tum glacies aeris flamma devicta liquescit; permanat calor argentum penetraleque frigus quando utrumque manu retinentes pocula rite sensimus infuso lympharum rore superne. Book I, lines 487–496 (Frank O. Copley)

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„Superstition is now in her turn cast down and trampled underfoot, whilst we by the victory are exalted high as heaven.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Quare religio pedibus subiecta vicissim opteritur, nos exaequat victoria caelo. Book I, lines 78–79 (tr. W. H. D. Rouse)

„So far as it goes, a small thing may give an analogy of great things, and show the tracks of knowledge.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Dum taxat, rerum magnarum parva potest res exemplare dare et vestigia notitiae. Book II, lines 123–124 (tr. Rouse)

„The steady drip of water causes stone to hollow and yield.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Stilicidi casus lapidem cavat. Book I, line 313 (tr. Stallings) Variant translation: Continual dropping wears away a stone. Compare: "The soft droppes of rain pierce the hard marble; many strokes overthrow the tallest oaks", John Lyly, Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), p. 81

„What is food to one, is to others bitter poison.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Ut quod ali cibus est aliis fuat acre venenum. Book IV, line 637 (reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations) Compare: "What's one man's poison, signor, / Is another's meat or drink", Beaumont and Fletcher, Love's Cure (1647), Act III, scene 2

„By protracting life, we do not deduct one jot from the duration of death.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Nec prorsum vitam ducendo demimus hilum tempore de mortis nec delibare valemus. Book III, lines 1087–1088 (tr. Rouse)

„So it is more useful to watch a man in times of peril, and in adversity to discern what kind of man he is; for then at last words of truth are drawn from the depths of his heart, and the mask is torn off, reality remains.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Quo magis in dubiis hominem spectare periclis convenit adversisque in rebus noscere qui sit; nam verae voces tum demum pectore ab imo eliciuntur et eripitur persona, manet res. Book III, lines 55–58 (reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations)

„What once sprung from earth sinks back into the earth.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Cedit item retro, de terra quod fuit ante, in terras. Book II, lines 999–1000 (tr. Bailey)

„Nay, even suppose when we have suffered fate,
The soul could feel in her divided state,
What's that to us? for we are only we,
While souls and bodies in one frame agree.
Nay, though our atoms should revolve by chance,
And matter leap into the former dance;
Though time our life and motion could restore,
And make our bodies what they were before,
What gain to us would all this bustle bring?
The new-made man would be another thing;
When once an interrupting pause is made,
That individual being is decayed.
We, who are dead and gone, shall bear no part
In all the pleasures, nor shall feel the smart,
Which to that other mortal shall accrue,
Whom of our matter, time shall mould anew.
For backward if you look, on that long space
Of ages past, and view the changing face
Of matter, tossed and variously combined
In sundry shapes, ’tis easy for the mind
From thence t' infer that seeds of things have been
In the same order as they now are seen:
Which yet our dark remembrance cannot trace,
Because a pause of life, a gaping space
Has come betwixt, where memory lies dead,
And all the wandering motions from the sense are fled.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Et si iam nostro sentit de corpore postquam distractast animi natura animaeque potestas, tamen est ad nos, qui comptu coniugioque corporis atque animae consistimus uniter apti. nec, si materiem nostram collegerit aetas post obitum rursumque redegerit ut sita nunc est, atque iterum nobis fuerint data lumina vitae, quicquam tamen ad nos id quoque factum, interrupta semel cum sit repetentia nostri. et nunc nil ad nos de nobis attinet, ante qui fuimus, [neque] iam de illis nos adficit angor. nam cum respicias inmensi temporis omne praeteritum spatium, tum motus materiai quam sint, facile hoc adcredere possis, saepe in eodem, ut nunc sunt, ordine posta haec eadem, quibus e nunc nos sumus, ante fuisse. nec memori tamen id quimus reprehendere mente; inter enim iectast vitai pausa vageque deerrarunt passim motus ab sensibus omnes. Book III, lines 843–860 (tr. John Dryden)

„For no fact is so simple we believe it at first sight,
And there is nothing that exists so great or marvellous
That over time mankind does not admire it less and less.“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Sed neque tam facilis res ulla est, quin ea primum difficilis magis ad credendum constet, itemque nil adeo magnum neque tam mirabile quicquam, quod non paulatim minuant mirarier omnes. Book II, lines 1026–1029 (tr. Stallings)

„O pitiable minds of men, O blind intelligences! In what gloom of life, in how great perils is passed all your poor span of time! not to see that all nature barks for is this, that pain be removed away out of the body, and that the mind, kept away from care and fear, enjoy a feeling of delight!“

—  Lucretius
De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), O miseras hominum mentes, o pectora caeca! qualibus in tenebris vitae quantisque periclis degitur hoc aevi quod cumquest! nonne videre nihil aliud sibi naturam latrare, nisi ut qui corpore seiunctus dolor absit, mente fruatur iucundo sensu cura semota metuque? Book II, lines 14–19 (tr. Rouse)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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