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Joseph Addison

Geburtstag: 1. Mai 1672
Todesdatum: 17. Juni 1719

Joseph Addison war ein englischer Dichter, Politiker und Journalist in der Frühzeit der Aufklärung. Wikipedia

Photo: After Godfrey Kneller / Public domain

Zitate Joseph Addison

„Eine Frau fragt in Liebessachen selten um Rat, bevor sie ihre Hochzeitskleider gekauft hat.“

—  Joseph Addison

On askin advice in affairs of love
("A woman seldom asks advice before she has bought her wedding clothes." - The Spectator No. 475 (4 September 1712)).

„Niemand ist so unglücklich wie ein Idol, das sich selbst überlebt hat.“

—  Joseph Addison

The Spectator
"There is not a more unhappy being than a superannuated idol." - The Spectator No. 73 (24 May 1711)

„Noch jetzt, scheint mir, tret ich auf klassischen Boden.“

—  Joseph Addison

Briefe über Italien
"And still I seem to tread on classic ground." - A Letter from Italy, to the Right Honourable Charles, Lord Halifax. 1701.

„Sieh, wie friedlich ein Christ sterben kann.“

—  Joseph Addison

Letzte Worte zu seinem Stiefsohn Thomas Tickell, dem späteren Lord Warwick
Original engl.: "See in what peace a Christian can die." - as quoted in Conjectures on Original Composition (1759) by Edward Young

„Wir tun immer etwas für die Nachwelt; gern würde ich sehen, dass die Nachwelt einmal für uns etwas tut.“

—  Joseph Addison

The Spectator
"We are always doing something for Posterity, but I would fain see Posterity do something for us." - The Spectator No. 587 (20 August 1714)

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„When I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out“

—  Joseph Addison

Thoughts in Westminster Abbey (1711).
Kontext: When I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart melts with compassion; when I see the tomb of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow: when I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.

„Reading is to the mind, what exercise is to the body.“

—  Joseph Addison

No. 147.
The Tatler (1711–1714)
Variante: A good conscience is to the soul what health is to the body
Kontext: Reading is to the mind, what exercise is to the body. As by the one, health is preserved, strengthened, and invigorated: by the other, virtue (which is the health of the mind) is kept alive, cherished, and confirmed.

„Keep up the loud harmonious song,
And imitate the blest above,
In joy, and harmony, and love.“

—  Joseph Addison

Song for St. Cecilia's Day (1692).
Kontext: Consecrate the place and day
To music and Cecilia.
Let no rough winds approach, nor dare
Invade the hallow'd bounds,
Nor rudely shake the tuneful air,
Nor spoil the fleeting sounds.
Nor mournful sigh nor groan be heard,
But gladness dwell on every tongue;
Whilst all, with voice and strings prepar'd,
Keep up the loud harmonious song,
And imitate the blest above,
In joy, and harmony, and love.

„Discretion has large and extended views, and, like a well-formed eye, commands a whole horizon: cunning is a kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a distance. Discretion the more it is discovered, gives a greater authority to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is once detected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of bringing about even those events which he might have done had he passed only for a plain man.“

—  Joseph Addison

No. 225.
The Tatler (1711–1714)
Kontext: At the same time that I think discretion the most useful talent a man can be master of, I look upon cunning to be the accomplishment of little, mean, ungenerous minds. Discretion points out the noblest ends to us, and pursues the most proper and laudable methods of attaining them: cunning has only private selfish aims, and sticks at nothing which may make them succeed. Discretion has large and extended views, and, like a well-formed eye, commands a whole horizon: cunning is a kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a distance. Discretion the more it is discovered, gives a greater authority to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is once detected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of bringing about even those events which he might have done had he passed only for a plain man. Discretion is the perfection of reason, and a guide to us in all the duties of life: cunning is a kind of instinct, that only looks out after our immediate interest and welfare. Discretion is only found in men of strong sense and good understandings, cunning is often to be met with in brutes themselves, and in persons who are but the fewest removes from them.

„A man's first care should be to avoid the reproaches of his own heart; his next to escape the censures of the world“

—  Joseph Addison

Kontext: A man's first care should be to avoid the reproaches of his own heart; his next to escape the censures of the world: if the last interferes with the former, it ought to be entirely neglected; but otherwise there cannot be a greater satisfaction to an honest mind, than to see those approbations which it gives itself seconded by the applauses of the public: a man is more sure of his conduct, when the verdict which he passes upon his own behaviour is thus warranted and confirmed by the opinion of all that know him.

On "Sir Roger", in The Spectator No. 122 (20 July 1711).

„Transported with the view, I'm lost
In wonder, love and praise.“

—  Joseph Addison

No. 453 (9 August 1712).
The Spectator (1711–1714)
Kontext: When all thy mercies, O my God,
My rising soul surveys,
Transported with the view, I'm lost
In wonder, love and praise.

„At the same time that I think discretion the most useful talent a man can be master of, I look upon cunning to be the accomplishment of little, mean, ungenerous minds.“

—  Joseph Addison

No. 225.
The Tatler (1711–1714)
Kontext: At the same time that I think discretion the most useful talent a man can be master of, I look upon cunning to be the accomplishment of little, mean, ungenerous minds. Discretion points out the noblest ends to us, and pursues the most proper and laudable methods of attaining them: cunning has only private selfish aims, and sticks at nothing which may make them succeed. Discretion has large and extended views, and, like a well-formed eye, commands a whole horizon: cunning is a kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a distance. Discretion the more it is discovered, gives a greater authority to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is once detected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of bringing about even those events which he might have done had he passed only for a plain man. Discretion is the perfection of reason, and a guide to us in all the duties of life: cunning is a kind of instinct, that only looks out after our immediate interest and welfare. Discretion is only found in men of strong sense and good understandings, cunning is often to be met with in brutes themselves, and in persons who are but the fewest removes from them.

„Great souls by instinct to each other turn,
Demand alliance, and in friendship burn“

—  Joseph Addison, The Campaign

Quelle: The Campaign (1704), Line 101.
Kontext: Great souls by instinct to each other turn,
Demand alliance, and in friendship burn;
A sudden friendship, while with stretched-out rays
They meet each other, mingling blaze with blaze.
Polished in courts, and hardened in the field,
Renowned for conquest, and in council skilled,
Their courage dwells not in a troubled flood
Of mounting spirits, and fermenting blood:
Lodged in the soul, with virtue overruled,
Inflamed by reason, and by reason cooled,
In hours of peace content to be unknown.
And only in the field of battle shown:
To souls like these, in mutual friendship joined,
Heaven dares intrust the cause of humankind.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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