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Joseph Addison

Geburtstag: 1. Mai 1672
Todesdatum: 17. Juni 1719

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Joseph Addison war ein englischer Dichter, Politiker und Journalist in der Frühzeit der Aufklärung.

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Zitate Joseph Addison

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„Sieh, wie friedlich ein Christ sterben kann.“

—  Joseph Addison
Letzte Worte zu seinem Stiefsohn Thomas Tickell, dem späteren Lord Warwick

„When I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out“

—  Joseph Addison
Context: When I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart melts with compassion; when I see the tomb of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow: when I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind. Thoughts in Westminster Abbey (1711).

„Reading is to the mind, what exercise is to the body.“

—  Joseph Addison
Context: Reading is to the mind, what exercise is to the body. As by the one, health is preserved, strengthened, and invigorated: by the other, virtue (which is the health of the mind) is kept alive, cherished, and confirmed. No. 147.

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„The Fear of Death often proves Mortal“

—  Joseph Addison
Context: The Fear of Death often proves Mortal, and sets People on Methods to save their Lives, which infallibly destroy them. No. 25 (29 March 1711).

„Eternity! thou pleasing dreadful thought!“

—  Joseph Addison
Context: Eternity! thou pleasing dreadful thought! Through what variety of untried being, Through what new scenes and changes must we pass! Act V, scene i.

„Let echo, too, perform her part,
Prolonging every note with art“

—  Joseph Addison
Context: Let echo, too, perform her part, Prolonging every note with art; And in a low expiring strain, Play all the concert o'er again. Ode for St. Cecilia's Day (1699), st. 4.

„Discretion has large and extended views, and, like a well-formed eye, commands a whole horizon: cunning is a kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a distance. Discretion the more it is discovered, gives a greater authority to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is once detected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of bringing about even those events which he might have done had he passed only for a plain man.“

—  Joseph Addison
Context: At the same time that I think discretion the most useful talent a man can be master of, I look upon cunning to be the accomplishment of little, mean, ungenerous minds. Discretion points out the noblest ends to us, and pursues the most proper and laudable methods of attaining them: cunning has only private selfish aims, and sticks at nothing which may make them succeed. Discretion has large and extended views, and, like a well-formed eye, commands a whole horizon: cunning is a kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a distance. Discretion the more it is discovered, gives a greater authority to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is once detected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of bringing about even those events which he might have done had he passed only for a plain man. Discretion is the perfection of reason, and a guide to us in all the duties of life: cunning is a kind of instinct, that only looks out after our immediate interest and welfare. Discretion is only found in men of strong sense and good understandings, cunning is often to be met with in brutes themselves, and in persons who are but the fewest removes from them. No. 225.

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„Music, the greatest good that mortals know,
And all of heaven we have below.“

—  Joseph Addison
Context: Music, the greatest good that mortals know, And all of heaven we have below. Song for St. Cecilia's Day (1692), st. 3.

„Great souls by instinct to each other turn,
Demand alliance, and in friendship burn“

—  Joseph Addison
Context: Great souls by instinct to each other turn, Demand alliance, and in friendship burn; A sudden friendship, while with stretched-out rays They meet each other, mingling blaze with blaze. Polished in courts, and hardened in the field, Renowned for conquest, and in council skilled, Their courage dwells not in a troubled flood Of mounting spirits, and fermenting blood: Lodged in the soul, with virtue overruled, Inflamed by reason, and by reason cooled, In hours of peace content to be unknown. And only in the field of battle shown: To souls like these, in mutual friendship joined, Heaven dares intrust the cause of humankind. Line 101.

„The discreet man finds out the talents of those he converses with, and knows how to apply them to proper uses.“

—  Joseph Addison
Context: The discreet man finds out the talents of those he converses with, and knows how to apply them to proper uses. Accordingly, if we look into particular communities and divisions of men, we may observe that it is the discreet man, not the witty, nor the learned, nor the brave, who guides the conversation, and gives measures to the society. No. 225.

„Every star, and every pow'r,
Look down on this important hour“

—  Joseph Addison
Context: Every star, and every pow'r, Look down on this important hour: Lend your protection and defence Every guard of innocence! Help me my Henry to assuage, To gain his love or bear his rage. Mysterious love, uncertain treasure, Hast thou more of pain or pleasure! Chill'd with tears, Kill'd with fears, Endless torments dwell about thee: Yet who would live, and live without thee! Queen Elinor in Rosamond (c. 1707), Act III, sc. ii.

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