Zitate von François-René de Chateaubriand

François-René de Chateaubriand Foto
5   0

François-René de Chateaubriand

Geburtstag: 4. September 1768
Todesdatum: 4. Juli 1848
Andere Namen: Francois R. de Chateaubriand, Chateaubriand

François-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand war ein französischer Schriftsteller, Politiker und Diplomat. Er gilt als einer der Begründer der literarischen Romantik in Frankreich. Wikipedia

Werk

Life of Rancé
François-René de Chateaubriand

Zitate François-René de Chateaubriand

„Die Götterbilder wanken.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand

Dieses Zitat geht weniger auf Chateubriand, denn auf Georg Büchmann zurück: "Chateaubriand [...] schildert am Schluss seines Buches "Les Martyrs ou le triomphe de la religion chrétienne" [... 1809], wie Alles in Rom donnert und kracht, als ein edles Märtyrerpaar den Tigern in der Arena preisgegeben wird, wie die Götterbilder wanken und man, wie einst in Jerusalem, eine Stimme rufen hört: Les dieux s'en vont". susning.nu http://susning.nu/buchmann/0319.html.
"alle Götzenbilder stürzten nieder, und man vernahm, wie einstens zu Jerusalem, die Stimme, welche sprach: Die Götter entflieh'n!" - Die Märtyrer. oder: Der Triumph der christlichen Religion. Uebersetzt von K. v. Kronfels. Freiburg 1829. S. 141 reader.digitale-sammlungen.de http://reader.digitale-sammlungen.de/de/fs1/object/display/bsb11089849_00141.html
"toutes les statues des idoles tombèrent, et l'on entendit, comme autrefois à Jérusalem, une voix qui disoit: « LES DIEUX S'EN VONT. »" - Oeuvres complètes, tome 15 II, Paris 1835, p.288 books.google https://books.google.de/books?id=1Y0GAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA288
Fragwürdig

„Die großen Menschen, die auf der Erde eine sehr kleine Familie bilden, finden leider nur sich selbst zum Nachahmen.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand

Von jenseits des Grabes
"Il tenait du sang italien ; sa nature était complexe : les grands hommes, très petite famille sur la terre, ne trouvent malheureusement qu’eux-mêmes pour s’imiter. " - :fr:s:Mémoires d’outre-tombe/Troisième partie/Livre VI. (Caractère de Bonaparte

„Man hätte gerne eine Sammlung der letzten Worte berühmter Menschen.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Life of Rancé

Vie de Rancé, 1844
Original franz.: "On aimerait à avoir un recueil des derniers mots prononcés par les personnes célèbres." - p.413 books.google.de https://books.google.de/books?id=plkOAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA413&dq=mots

„One does not learn how to die by killing others.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe

Book IX: Ch. 4: Danton – Camille Desmoulins – Fabre d’Églantine.
Mémoires d'outre-tombe (1848 – 1850)

„As soon as a true thought has entered our mind, it gives a light which makes us see a crowd of other objects which we have never perceived before.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand

Aussitôt qu'une pensée vraie est entrée dans notre esprit, elle jette une lumière qui nous fait voir une foule d'autres objets que nous n'apercevions pas auparavant.
As quoted in A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors of the World, both Ancient and Modern (1908) by Tyron Edwards.

„How small man is on this little atom where he dies! But how great his intelligence!“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe

Book XLII: Ch. 18: A summary of the changes which have occurred around the globe in my lifetime
Mémoires d'outre-tombe (1848 – 1850)
Kontext: How small man is on this little atom where he dies! But how great his intelligence! He knows when the face of the stars must be masked in darkness, when the comets will return after thousands of years, he who lasts only an instant! A microscopic insect lost in a fold of the heavenly robe, the orbs cannot hide from him a single one of their movements in the depth of space. What destinies will those stars, new to us, light? Is their revelation bound up with some new phase of humanity? You will know, race to be born; I know not, and I am departing.

„A degree of silence envelops Washington’s actions; he moved slowly; one might say that he felt charged with future liberty, and that he feared to compromise it. It was not his own destiny that inspired this new species of hero: it was that of his country; he did not allow himself to enjoy what did not belong to him; but from that profound humility what glory emerged!“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe

Book VI: Ch. 8: Comparison of Washington and Bonaparte.
Mémoires d'outre-tombe (1848 – 1850)
Kontext: A degree of silence envelops Washington’s actions; he moved slowly; one might say that he felt charged with future liberty, and that he feared to compromise it. It was not his own destiny that inspired this new species of hero: it was that of his country; he did not allow himself to enjoy what did not belong to him; but from that profound humility what glory emerged! Search the woods where Washington’s sword gleamed: what do you find? Tombs? No; a world! Washington has left the United States behind for a monument on the field of battle.
Bonaparte shared no trait with that serious American: he fought amidst thunder in an old world; he thought about nothing but creating his own fame; he was inspired only by his own fate. He seemed to know that his project would be short, that the torrent which falls from such heights flows swiftly; he hastened to enjoy and abuse his glory, like fleeting youth. Following the example of Homer’s gods, in four paces he reached the ends of the world. He appeared on every shore; he wrote his name hurriedly in the annals of every people; he threw royal crowns to his family and his generals; he hurried through his monuments, his laws, his victories. Leaning over the world, with one hand he deposed kings, with the other he pulled down the giant, Revolution; but, in eliminating anarchy, he stifled liberty, and ended by losing his own on his last field of battle.
Each was rewarded according to his efforts: Washington brings a nation to independence; a justice at peace, he falls asleep beneath his own roof in the midst of his compatriots’ grief and the veneration of nations.
Bonaparte robs a nation of its independence: deposed as emperor, he is sent into exile, where the world’s anxiety still does not think him safely enough imprisoned, guarded by the Ocean. He dies: the news proclaimed on the door of the palace in front of which the conqueror had announced so many funerals, neither detains nor astonishes the passer-by: what have the citizens to mourn?
Washington’s Republic lives on; Bonaparte’s empire is destroyed. Washington and Bonaparte emerged from the womb of democracy: both of them born to liberty, the former remained faithful to her, the latter betrayed her.
Washington acted as the representative of the needs, the ideas, the enlightened men, the opinions of his age; he supported, not thwarted, the stirrings of intellect; he desired only what he had to desire, the very thing to which he had been called: from which derives the coherence and longevity of his work. That man who struck few blows because he kept things in proportion has merged his existence with that of his country: his glory is the heritage of civilisation; his fame has risen like one of those public sanctuaries where a fecund and inexhaustible spring flows.

„I remember Castelnau: like me Ambassador to England, who wrote like me a narrative of his life in London. On the last page of Book VII, he says to his son: ‘I will deal with this event in Book VIII,’ and Book VIII of Castelnau’s Memoirs does not exist: that warns me to take advantage of being alive.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe

Book VI: Ch. 8: Comparison of Washington and Bonaparte
Mémoires d'outre-tombe (1848 – 1850)
Kontext: I halt at the beginning of my travels, in Pennsylvania, in order to compare Washington and Bonaparte. I would rather not have concerned myself with them until the point where I had met Napoleon; but if I came to the edge of my grave without having reached the year 1814 in my tale, no one would then know anything of what I would have written concerning these two representatives of Providence. I remember Castelnau: like me Ambassador to England, who wrote like me a narrative of his life in London. On the last page of Book VII, he says to his son: ‘I will deal with this event in Book VIII,’ and Book VIII of Castelnau’s Memoirs does not exist: that warns me to take advantage of being alive.

„I behold the light of a dawn whose sunrise I shall never see. It only remains for me to sit down at the edge of my grave; then I shall descend boldly, crucifix in hand, into eternity.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe

Book XLII: Ch. 18: A summary of the changes which have occurred around the globe in my lifetime
Mémoires d'outre-tombe (1848 – 1850)
Kontext: New storms will arise; one can believe in calamities to come which will surpass the afflictions we have been overwhelmed by in the past; already, men are thinking of bandaging their old wounds to return to the battlefield. However, I do not expect an imminent outbreak of war: nations and kings are equally weary; unforeseen catastrophe will not yet fall on France: what follows me will only be the effect of general transformation. No doubt there will be painful moments: the face of the world cannot change without suffering. But, once again, there will be no separate revolutions; simply the great revolution approaching its end. The scenes of tomorrow no longer concern me; they call for other artists: your turn, gentlemen!
As I write these last words, my window, which looks west over the gardens of the Foreign Mission, is open: it is six in the morning; I can see the pale and swollen moon; it is sinking over the spire of the Invalides, scarcely touched by the first golden glow from the East; one might say that the old world was ending, and the new beginning. I behold the light of a dawn whose sunrise I shall never see. It only remains for me to sit down at the edge of my grave; then I shall descend boldly, crucifix in hand, into eternity.

„I have been present at sieges, congresses, conclaves, at the restoration and demolition of thrones. I have made history, and been able to write it. … Within and alongside my age, perhaps without wishing or seeking to, I have exerted upon it a triple influence, religious, political and literary.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe

Preface (1833).
Mémoires d'outre-tombe (1848 – 1850)
Kontext: I have borne the musket of a soldier, the traveller’s cane, and the pilgrim’s staff: as a sailor my fate has been as inconstant as the wind: a kingfisher, I have made my nest among the waves.
I have been party to peace and war: I have signed treaties, protocols, and along the way published numerous works. I have been made privy to party secrets, of court and state: I have viewed closely the rarest disasters, the greatest good fortune, the highest reputations. I have been present at sieges, congresses, conclaves, at the restoration and demolition of thrones. I have made history, and been able to write it. … Within and alongside my age, perhaps without wishing or seeking to, I have exerted upon it a triple influence, religious, political and literary.

„New storms will arise; one can believe in calamities to come which will surpass the afflictions we have been overwhelmed by in the past; already, men are thinking of bandaging their old wounds to return to the battlefield.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe

Book XLII: Ch. 18: A summary of the changes which have occurred around the globe in my lifetime
Mémoires d'outre-tombe (1848 – 1850)
Kontext: New storms will arise; one can believe in calamities to come which will surpass the afflictions we have been overwhelmed by in the past; already, men are thinking of bandaging their old wounds to return to the battlefield. However, I do not expect an imminent outbreak of war: nations and kings are equally weary; unforeseen catastrophe will not yet fall on France: what follows me will only be the effect of general transformation. No doubt there will be painful moments: the face of the world cannot change without suffering. But, once again, there will be no separate revolutions; simply the great revolution approaching its end. The scenes of tomorrow no longer concern me; they call for other artists: your turn, gentlemen!
As I write these last words, my window, which looks west over the gardens of the Foreign Mission, is open: it is six in the morning; I can see the pale and swollen moon; it is sinking over the spire of the Invalides, scarcely touched by the first golden glow from the East; one might say that the old world was ending, and the new beginning. I behold the light of a dawn whose sunrise I shall never see. It only remains for me to sit down at the edge of my grave; then I shall descend boldly, crucifix in hand, into eternity.

„Washington acted as the representative of the needs, the ideas, the enlightened men, the opinions of his age; he supported, not thwarted, the stirrings of intellect; he desired only what he had to desire, the very thing to which he had been called: from which derives the coherence and longevity of his work.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe

Book VI: Ch. 8: Comparison of Washington and Bonaparte.
Mémoires d'outre-tombe (1848 – 1850)
Kontext: A degree of silence envelops Washington’s actions; he moved slowly; one might say that he felt charged with future liberty, and that he feared to compromise it. It was not his own destiny that inspired this new species of hero: it was that of his country; he did not allow himself to enjoy what did not belong to him; but from that profound humility what glory emerged! Search the woods where Washington’s sword gleamed: what do you find? Tombs? No; a world! Washington has left the United States behind for a monument on the field of battle.
Bonaparte shared no trait with that serious American: he fought amidst thunder in an old world; he thought about nothing but creating his own fame; he was inspired only by his own fate. He seemed to know that his project would be short, that the torrent which falls from such heights flows swiftly; he hastened to enjoy and abuse his glory, like fleeting youth. Following the example of Homer’s gods, in four paces he reached the ends of the world. He appeared on every shore; he wrote his name hurriedly in the annals of every people; he threw royal crowns to his family and his generals; he hurried through his monuments, his laws, his victories. Leaning over the world, with one hand he deposed kings, with the other he pulled down the giant, Revolution; but, in eliminating anarchy, he stifled liberty, and ended by losing his own on his last field of battle.
Each was rewarded according to his efforts: Washington brings a nation to independence; a justice at peace, he falls asleep beneath his own roof in the midst of his compatriots’ grief and the veneration of nations.
Bonaparte robs a nation of its independence: deposed as emperor, he is sent into exile, where the world’s anxiety still does not think him safely enough imprisoned, guarded by the Ocean. He dies: the news proclaimed on the door of the palace in front of which the conqueror had announced so many funerals, neither detains nor astonishes the passer-by: what have the citizens to mourn?
Washington’s Republic lives on; Bonaparte’s empire is destroyed. Washington and Bonaparte emerged from the womb of democracy: both of them born to liberty, the former remained faithful to her, the latter betrayed her.
Washington acted as the representative of the needs, the ideas, the enlightened men, the opinions of his age; he supported, not thwarted, the stirrings of intellect; he desired only what he had to desire, the very thing to which he had been called: from which derives the coherence and longevity of his work. That man who struck few blows because he kept things in proportion has merged his existence with that of his country: his glory is the heritage of civilisation; his fame has risen like one of those public sanctuaries where a fecund and inexhaustible spring flows.

„I have explored the seas of the Old World and the New, and trodden the soil of the four quarters of the Earth.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe

Preface (1833).
Mémoires d'outre-tombe (1848 – 1850)
Kontext: I have explored the seas of the Old World and the New, and trodden the soil of the four quarters of the Earth. Having camped in the cabins of Iroquois, and beneath the tents of Arabs, in the wigwams of Hurons, in the remains of Athens, Jerusalem, Memphis, Carthage, Granada, among Greeks, Turks and Moors, among forests and ruins; after wearing the bearskin cloak of the savage, and the silk caftan of the Mameluke, after suffering poverty, hunger, thirst, and exile, I have sat, a minister and ambassador, covered with gold lace, gaudy with ribbons and decorations, at the table of kings, the feasts of princes and princesses, only to fall once more into indigence and know imprisonment.

„The scenes of tomorrow no longer concern me; they call for other artists: your turn, gentlemen!“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand, buch Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe

Book XLII: Ch. 18: A summary of the changes which have occurred around the globe in my lifetime
Mémoires d'outre-tombe (1848 – 1850)
Kontext: New storms will arise; one can believe in calamities to come which will surpass the afflictions we have been overwhelmed by in the past; already, men are thinking of bandaging their old wounds to return to the battlefield. However, I do not expect an imminent outbreak of war: nations and kings are equally weary; unforeseen catastrophe will not yet fall on France: what follows me will only be the effect of general transformation. No doubt there will be painful moments: the face of the world cannot change without suffering. But, once again, there will be no separate revolutions; simply the great revolution approaching its end. The scenes of tomorrow no longer concern me; they call for other artists: your turn, gentlemen!
As I write these last words, my window, which looks west over the gardens of the Foreign Mission, is open: it is six in the morning; I can see the pale and swollen moon; it is sinking over the spire of the Invalides, scarcely touched by the first golden glow from the East; one might say that the old world was ending, and the new beginning. I behold the light of a dawn whose sunrise I shall never see. It only remains for me to sit down at the edge of my grave; then I shall descend boldly, crucifix in hand, into eternity.

„To himself, he always appears to be doing both.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand

Misattributed to Chateaubriand on the internet and even some recently published books, this statement actually originated with L. P. Jacks in Education through Recreation (1932)
Misattributed
Kontext: A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play; his labor and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence through whatever he is doing, and leaves others to determine whether he is working or playing. To himself, he always appears to be doing both.

„A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play; his labor and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation.“

—  François-René de Chateaubriand

Misattributed to Chateaubriand on the internet and even some recently published books, this statement actually originated with L. P. Jacks in Education through Recreation (1932)
Misattributed
Kontext: A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play; his labor and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence through whatever he is doing, and leaves others to determine whether he is working or playing. To himself, he always appears to be doing both.

Ähnliche Autoren

Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord Foto
Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord15
französischer Diplomat
Alfred De Musset Foto
Alfred De Musset6
französischer Schriftsteller
Anatole France Foto
Anatole France12
französischer Schriftsteller
Charles Baudelaire Foto
Charles Baudelaire17
französischer Schriftsteller
Léon Bloy Foto
Léon Bloy4
französischer Schriftsteller und Sprachphilosoph
Alexandre Dumas d.Ä. Foto
Alexandre Dumas d.Ä.7
französischer Schriftsteller
Gustave Flaubert Foto
Gustave Flaubert38
französischer Schriftsteller (1821-1880)
Guy De Maupassant Foto
Guy De Maupassant8
französischer Schriftsteller und Journalist
Jules Renard Foto
Jules Renard16
französischer Schriftsteller
Honoré De Balzac Foto
Honoré De Balzac67
Französischer Schriftsteller
Heutige Jubiläen
Richard Bach Foto
Richard Bach9
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller 1936
Alan Turing Foto
Alan Turing5
britischer Logiker, Mathematiker und Kryptoanalytiker 1912 - 1954
Markus Zusak Foto
Markus Zusak13
deutsch-australischer Schriftsteller 1975
Rafik Schami Foto
Rafik Schami10
syrisch-deutscher Schriftsteller und promovierter Chemiker 1946
Weitere 50 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord Foto
Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord15
französischer Diplomat
Alfred De Musset Foto
Alfred De Musset6
französischer Schriftsteller
Anatole France Foto
Anatole France12
französischer Schriftsteller
Charles Baudelaire Foto
Charles Baudelaire17
französischer Schriftsteller
Léon Bloy Foto
Léon Bloy4
französischer Schriftsteller und Sprachphilosoph