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Alfred Tennyson

Geburtstag: 6. August 1809
Todesdatum: 6. Oktober 1892
Andere Namen: Alfred Lord Tennyson, Lord Alfred Tennyson

Alfred Tennyson, 1. Baron Tennyson war ein britischer Dichter des Viktorianischen Zeitalters.

Zitate Alfred Tennyson

„Meine Stärke ist wie die Stärke von zehn, denn mein Herz ist rein.“

—  Alfred Tennyson

Original engl.: "My strength is as the strength of ten, because my heart is pure." - Sir Galahad http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/Galahad.htm (1842)

„Old age hath yet his honor and his toil.
Death closes all; but something ere the end,
Some work of noble note, may yet be done,
Not unbecoming men that strove with gods.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, buch Ulysses

Quelle: Ulysses (1842), l. 46-53
Kontext: Souls that have toil'd, and wrought, and thought with me —
That ever with a frolic welcome took
The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed
Free hearts, free foreheads — you and I are old;
Old age hath yet his honor and his toil.
Death closes all; but something ere the end,
Some work of noble note, may yet be done,
Not unbecoming men that strove with gods.

„Thus truth was multiplied on truth“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Lady Clara Vere de Vere

The Poet (1830)
Kontext: p>Thus truth was multiplied on truth, the world
Like one great garden show'd,
And thro' the wreaths of floating dark up-curl'd,
Rare sunrise flow'dAnd Freedom rear'd in that august sunrise
Her beautiful bold brow,
When rites and forms before his burning eyes
Melted like snow.</p

„Though much is taken, much abides; and though
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are —
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, buch Ulysses

Quelle: Ulysses (1842), l. 63-70
Kontext: It may be that the gulfs will wash us down;
It may be that we shall touch the Happy Isles,
And see the great Achilles, whom we knew.
Though much is taken, much abides; and though
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are —
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

„How dull it is to pause, to make an end,
To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use!
As tho' to breath were life.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, buch Ulysses

Quelle: Ulysses (1842), l. 22-32
Kontext: How dull it is to pause, to make an end,
To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use!
As tho' to breath were life. Life piled on life
Were all too little, and of one to me
Little remains: but every hour is saved
From that eternal silence, something more,
A bringer of new things; and vile it were
For some three suns to store and hoard myself,
And this gray spirit yearning in desire
To follow knowledge like a sinking star,
Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.

„She only said, "My life is dreary,
He cometh not," she said;
She said, "I am aweary, aweary,
I would that I were dead!'“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Mariana

"Mariana" (1830)
Kontext: With blackest moss the flower plots
Were thickly crusted, one and all;
The rusted nails fell from the knots
That held the pear to the gable wall.
The broken sheds looked sad and strange:
Unlifted was the clinking latch;
Weeded and worn the ancient thatch
Upon the lonely moated grange.
She only said, "My life is dreary,
He cometh not," she said;
She said, "I am aweary, aweary,
I would that I were dead!'

„Meet is it changes should control
Our being, lest we rust in ease.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

" Love Thou Thy Land http://home.att.net/%7ETennysonPoetry/lttl.htm", st. 11 (1842)
Kontext: Meet is it changes should control
Our being, lest we rust in ease.
We all are changed by still degrees,
All but the basis of the soul.

„Oh, to what uses shall we put
The wildweed-flower that simply blows?
And is there any moral shut
Within the bosom of the rose?“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Day-Dream

Moral, st. 1
The Day-Dream (1842)
Kontext: So, Lady Flora, take my lay,
And if you find no moral there,
Go, look in any glass and say,
What moral is in being fair.
Oh, to what uses shall we put
The wildweed-flower that simply blows?
And is there any moral shut
Within the bosom of the rose?

„He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ring'd with the azure world, he stands“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

" The Eagle http://home.att.net/%7ETennysonPoetry/eagle.htm" (1851)
Kontext: p>He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
He watches from his mountain walls,
And like a thunderbolt he falls.</p

„Come forth I charge thee, arise,
Thou of the many tongues, the myriad eyes!“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Ode to Memory (1830)
Kontext: Come forth I charge thee, arise,
Thou of the many tongues, the myriad eyes!
Thou comest not with shows of flaunting vines
Unto mine inner eye,
Divinest Memory!

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„Little flower — but if I could understand
What you are, root and all, and all in all,
I should know what God and man is.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

"Flower in the Crannied Wall" (1869)
Kontext: Flower in the crannied wall,
I pluck you out of the crannies,
I hold you here, root and all, in my hand,
Little flower — but if I could understand
What you are, root and all, and all in all,
I should know what God and man is.

„We dare not even by silence sanction lies.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

" The Third of February, 1852 http://home.att.net/%7ETennysonPoetry/tfe.htm", st. 2 (1852)
Kontext: We love not this French God, the child of hell,
Wild War, who breaks the converse of the wise;
But though we love kind Peace so well,
We dare not even by silence sanction lies.
It might be safe our censures to withdraw,
And yet, my Lords, not well; there is a higher law.

„The stream flows,
The wind blows,
The cloud fleets,
The heart beats,
Nothing will die.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Nothing Will Die (1830)
Kontext: When will the stream be aweary of flowing
Under my eye?
When will the wind be aweary of blowing
Over the sky?
When will the clouds be aweary of fleeting?
When will the heart be aweary of beating?
And nature die?
Never, oh! never, nothing will die;
The stream flows,
The wind blows,
The cloud fleets,
The heart beats,
Nothing will die.

„Strike up a song, my friends, and then to bed.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Foresters

Act I, Scene III
The Foresters, Robin Hood and Maid Marion (1892)
Kontext: Friends,
I am only merry for an hour or two
Upon a birthday: if this life of ours
Be a good glad thing, why should we make us merry
Because a year of it is gone? but Hope
Smiles from the threshold of the year to come
Whispering 'It will be happier;' and old faces
Press round us, and warm hands close with warm hands,
And thro' the blood the wine leaps to the brain
Like April sap to the topmost tree, that shoots
New buds to heaven, whereon the throstle rock'd
Sings a new song to the new year — and you,
Strike up a song, my friends, and then to bed.

„Rich in saving common-sense,
And, as the greatest only are,
In his simplicity sublime.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

St. IV
Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington (1852)
Kontext: Rich in saving common-sense,
And, as the greatest only are,
In his simplicity sublime.
O good gray head which all men knew,
O voice from which their omens all men drew,
O iron nerve to true occasion true,
O fallen at length that tower of strength
Which stood four-square to all the winds that blew!

„Yet fill my glass: give me one kiss:
My own sweet Alice, we must die.
There's somewhat in this world amiss
Shall be unriddled by and by.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

"The Miller's Daughter" (1832)
Kontext: Yet fill my glass: give me one kiss:
My own sweet Alice, we must die.
There's somewhat in this world amiss
Shall be unriddled by and by.
There's somewhat flows to us in life,
But more is taken quite away.
Pray, Alice, pray, my darling wife,
That we may die the self-same day.

„The poet in a golden clime was born,
With golden stars above;
Dower'd with the hate of hate, the scorn of scorn,
The love of love.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Lady Clara Vere de Vere

The Poet (1830)
Kontext: The poet in a golden clime was born,
With golden stars above;
Dower'd with the hate of hate, the scorn of scorn,
The love of love.
He saw thro' life and death, thro' good and ill,
He saw thro' his own soul.
The marvel of the everlasting will,
An open scroll,
Before him lay; with echoing feet he threaded
The secretest walks of fame:
The viewless arrows of his thoughts were headed
And wing'd with flame,
Like Indian reeds blown from his silver tongue...

„And in her raiment's hem was traced in flame
WISDOM, a name to shake
All evil dreams of power — a sacred name.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Lady Clara Vere de Vere

The Poet (1830)
Kontext: There was no blood upon her maiden robes
Sunn'd by those orient skies;
But round about the circles of the globes
Of her keen
And in her raiment's hem was traced in flame
WISDOM, a name to shake
All evil dreams of power — a sacred name.
And when she spake,
Her words did gather thunder as they ran,
And as the lightning to the thunder
Which follows it, riving the spirit of man,
Making earth wonder,
So was their meaning to her words. No sword
Of wrath her right arm whirl'd,
But one poor poet's scroll, and with his word
She shook the world.

„What is it that will last?
All things are taken from us, and become
Portions and parcels of the dreadful past.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Lotos-Eaters

Choric Song, st. 4
The Lotos-Eaters (1832)
Kontext: Death is the end of life; ah, why
Should life all labour be?
Let us alone. Time driveth onward fast,
And in a little while our lips are dumb.
Let us alone. What is it that will last?
All things are taken from us, and become
Portions and parcels of the dreadful past.
Let us alone. What pleasure can we have
To war with evil? Is there any peace
In ever climbing up the climbing wave?
All things have rest, and ripen toward the grave
In silence; ripen, fall and cease:
Give us long rest or death, dark death, or dreamful ease.

„She left the web, she left the loom,
She made three paces through the room,
She saw the water-lily bloom,
She saw the helmet and the plume,
She looked down to Camelot.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Lady of Shalott

Pt. III, st. 5
The Lady of Shalott (1832)
Kontext: She left the web, she left the loom,
She made three paces through the room,
She saw the water-lily bloom,
She saw the helmet and the plume,
She looked down to Camelot.
Out flew the web and floated wide;
The mirror cracked from side to side;
"The curse is come upon me," cried
The Lady of Shalott.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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