Zitate von Alfred Tennyson

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Alfred Tennyson

Geburtstag: 6. August 1809
Todesdatum: 6. Oktober 1892
Andere Namen: Alfred Lord Tennyson, Lord Alfred Tennyson

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Alfred Tennyson, 1. Baron Tennyson war ein britischer Dichter des Viktorianischen Zeitalters.

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Zitate Alfred Tennyson

„Meine Stärke ist wie die Stärke von zehn, denn mein Herz ist rein.“

—  Alfred Tennyson
Original engl.: "My strength is as the strength of ten, because my heart is pure." - Sir Galahad http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/Galahad.htm (1842)

„Old age hath yet his honor and his toil.
Death closes all; but something ere the end,
Some work of noble note, may yet be done,
Not unbecoming men that strove with gods.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, buch Ulysses
Ulysses (1842), Context: Souls that have toil'd, and wrought, and thought with me — That ever with a frolic welcome took The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed Free hearts, free foreheads — you and I are old; Old age hath yet his honor and his toil. Death closes all; but something ere the end, Some work of noble note, may yet be done, Not unbecoming men that strove with gods. l. 46-53

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„Make broad thy shoulders to receive my weight“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Morte D'Arthur (1842), Context: My end draws nigh; 't is time that I were gone. Make broad thy shoulders to receive my weight Lines 163-164

„So was their meaning to her words. No sword
Of wrath her right arm whirl'd,
But one poor poet's scroll, and with his word
She shook the world.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Lady Clara Vere de Vere
The Poet (1830), Context: There was no blood upon her maiden robes Sunn'd by those orient skies; But round about the circles of the globes Of her keen And in her raiment's hem was traced in flame WISDOM, a name to shake All evil dreams of power — a sacred name. And when she spake, Her words did gather thunder as they ran, And as the lightning to the thunder Which follows it, riving the spirit of man, Making earth wonder, So was their meaning to her words. No sword Of wrath her right arm whirl'd, But one poor poet's scroll, and with his word She shook the world.

„Where Claribel low-lieth
The breezes pause and die,
Letting the rose-leaves fall“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Claribel
Context: Where Claribel low-lieth The breezes pause and die, Letting the rose-leaves fall: But the solemn oak-tree sigheth, Thick-leaved, ambrosial, With an ancient melody Of an inward agony, Where Claribel low-lieth. "Claribel" (1830)

„With youthful fancy reinspired,
We may hold converse with all forms
Of the many-sided mind,
And those whom passion hath not blinded,
Subtle-thoughted, myriad-minded.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Ode to Memory (1830), Context: Whither in after life retired From brawling storms, From weary wind, With youthful fancy reinspired, We may hold converse with all forms Of the many-sided mind, And those whom passion hath not blinded, Subtle-thoughted, myriad-minded.

„I grow in worth, and wit, and sense,
Unboding critic-pen,
Or that eternal want of pence,
Which vexes public men“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: I grow in worth, and wit, and sense, Unboding critic-pen, Or that eternal want of pence, Which vexes public men, Who hold their hands to all, and cry For that which all deny them — Who sweep the crossings, wet or dry, And all the world go by them. " Will Waterproof's Lyrical Monologue http://whitewolf.newcastle.edu.au/words/authors/T/TennysonAlfred/verse/englishidyls/willwaterproof.html", st. 6 (1842)

„Rich in saving common-sense,
And, as the greatest only are,
In his simplicity sublime.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington (1852), Context: Rich in saving common-sense, And, as the greatest only are, In his simplicity sublime. O good gray head which all men knew, O voice from which their omens all men drew, O iron nerve to true occasion true, O fallen at length that tower of strength Which stood four-square to all the winds that blew! St. IV

„Meet is it changes should control
Our being, lest we rust in ease.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: Meet is it changes should control Our being, lest we rust in ease. We all are changed by still degrees, All but the basis of the soul. " Love Thou Thy Land http://home.att.net/%7ETennysonPoetry/lttl.htm", st. 11 (1842)

„Yet fill my glass: give me one kiss:
My own sweet Alice, we must die.
There's somewhat in this world amiss
Shall be unriddled by and by.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: Yet fill my glass: give me one kiss: My own sweet Alice, we must die. There's somewhat in this world amiss Shall be unriddled by and by. There's somewhat flows to us in life, But more is taken quite away. Pray, Alice, pray, my darling wife, That we may die the self-same day. "The Miller's Daughter" (1832)

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„And Freedom rear'd in that august sunrise
Her beautiful bold brow,
When rites and forms before his burning eyes
Melted like snow.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Lady Clara Vere de Vere
The Poet (1830), Context: p>Thus truth was multiplied on truth, the world Like one great garden show'd, And thro' the wreaths of floating dark up-curl'd, Rare sunrise flow'dAnd Freedom rear'd in that august sunrise Her beautiful bold brow, When rites and forms before his burning eyes Melted like snow.</p

„In sweet dreams softer than unbroken rest
Thou leddest by the hand thine infant Hope.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Ode to Memory (1830), Context: In sweet dreams softer than unbroken rest Thou leddest by the hand thine infant Hope. The eddying of her garments caught from thee The light of thy great presence; and the cope Of the half-attain'd futurity, Though deep not fathomless, Was cloven with the million stars which tremble O'er the deep mind of dauntless infancy.

„So flash'd and fell the brand Excalibur.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Morte D'Arthur (1842), Context: The great brand Made lightnings in the splendour of the moon, And flashing round and round, and whirl'd in an arch, Shot like a streamer of the northern morn, Seen where the moving isles of winter shock By night, with noises of the northern sea. So flash'd and fell the brand Excalibur. Lines 136-142

„Oh, to what uses shall we put
The wildweed-flower that simply blows?
And is there any moral shut
Within the bosom of the rose?“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Day-Dream
The Day-Dream (1842), Context: So, Lady Flora, take my lay, And if you find no moral there, Go, look in any glass and say, What moral is in being fair. Oh, to what uses shall we put The wildweed-flower that simply blows? And is there any moral shut Within the bosom of the rose? Moral, st. 1

„Half a league half a league
Half a league onward
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred:“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Charge of the Light Brigade
The Charge of the Light Brigade (1854), Context: Half a league half a league Half a league onward All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred: 'Forward the Light Brigade Charge for the guns' he said Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. St. 1

„He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ring'd with the azure world, he stands“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: p>He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls.</p " The Eagle http://home.att.net/%7ETennysonPoetry/eagle.htm" (1851)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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