„To follow knowledge like a sinking star,
Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.“

—  Alfred Tennyson, buch Ulysses

Quelle: Ulysses (1842), l. 22-32
Kontext: How dull it is to pause, to make an end,
To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use!
As tho' to breath were life. Life piled on life
Were all too little, and of one to me
Little remains: but every hour is saved
From that eternal silence, something more,
A bringer of new things; and vile it were
For some three suns to store and hoard myself,
And this gray spirit yearning in desire
To follow knowledge like a sinking star,
Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Alfred Tennyson Foto
Alfred Tennyson1
britischer Dichter 1809 - 1892

Ähnliche Zitate

Aldous Huxley Foto
Homér Foto
H.P. Lovecraft Foto
Henry Suso Foto

„Here in this region beyond thought the human spirit actively soars.“

—  Henry Suso Dominican friar and mystic 1295 - 1366

Here in this region beyond thought the human spirit actively soars
The Exemplar, The Life of the Servant

„There is no knowledge and science like pondering and thought; and there is no prosperity and advancement like knowledge and science.“

—  Ali cousin and son-in-law of the Islamic prophet Muhammad 601 - 661

Majlisi, Bihārul Anwār, vol. 1, p. 179
Regarding Knowledge & Wisdom, General

Joseph Addison Foto

„The utmost extent of man's knowledge, is to know that he knows nothing.“

—  Joseph Addison politician, writer and playwright 1672 - 1719

These words, sometimes attributed to Addison, are not found in his works, but in The Spectator, no. 54, he translates the following words of Socrates, as quoted in Plato's Apology: "When I left him, I reasoned thus with myself: I am wiser than this man, for neither of us appears to know anything great and good; but he fancies he knows something, although he knows nothing; whereas I, as I do not know anything, so I do not fancy I do. In this trifling particular, then, I appear to be wiser than he, because I do not fancy I know what I do not know."
Misattributed

Madonna Foto
Alfred, Lord Tennyson Foto
Cassandra Clare Foto
James Montgomery Foto

„Nor sink those stars in empty night:
They hide themselves in heaven's own light.“

—  James Montgomery British editor, hymn writer, and poet 1771 - 1854

Friends.
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

Alexander Maclaren Foto
Alfred, Lord Tennyson Foto

„Follow you the star that lights a desert pathway, yours or mine.
Forward, till you see the Highest Human Nature is divine.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson British poet laureate 1809 - 1892

Quelle: Locksley Hall Sixty Years After (1886), Line 275

William James Foto

„Humbug is humbug, even though it bear the scientific name, and the total expression of human experience, as I view it objectively, invincibly urges me beyond the narrow 'scientific' bounds.“

—  William James American philosopher, psychologist, and pragmatist 1842 - 1910

Lecture XX, "Conclusions"
1900s, The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902)
Kontext: This thoroughly 'pragmatic' view of religion has usually been taken as a matter of course by common men. They have interpolated divine miracles into the field of nature, they have built a heaven out beyond the grave. It is only transcendentalist metaphysicians who think that, without adding any concrete details to Nature, or subtracting any, but by simply calling it the expression of absolute spirit, you make it more divine just as it stands. I believe the pragmatic way of taking religion to be the deeper way. It gives it body as well as soul, it makes it claim, as everything real must claim, some characteristic realm of fact as its very own. What the more characteristically divine facts are, apart from the actual inflow of energy in the faith-state and the prayer-state, I know not. But the over-belief on which I am ready to make my personal venture is that they exist. The whole drift of my education goes to persuade me that the world of our present consciousness is only one out of many worlds of consciousness that exist, and that those other worlds must contain experiences which have a meaning for our life also; and that although in the main their experiences and those of this world keep discrete, yet the two become continuous at certain points, and higher energies filter in. By being faithful in my poor measure to this over-belief, I seem to myself to keep more sane and true. I can, of course, put myself into the sectarian scientist's attitude, and imagine vividly that the world of sensations and scientific laws and objects may be all. But whenever I do this, I hear that inward monitor of which W. K. Clifford once wrote, whispering the word 'bosh!' Humbug is humbug, even though it bear the scientific name, and the total expression of human experience, as I view it objectively, invincibly urges me beyond the narrow 'scientific' bounds. Assuredly, the real world is of a different temperament — more intricately built than physical science allows. So my objective and my subjective conscience both hold me to the over-belief which I express. Who knows whether the faithfulness of individuals here below to their own poor over-beliefs may not actually help God in turn to be more effectively faithful to his own greater tasks?

Michel De Montaigne Foto

„What of a truth that is bounded by these mountains and is falsehood to the world that lives beyond?“

—  Michel De Montaigne, buch Essays

Quelle vérité que ces montagnes bornent, qui est mensonge qui se tient au delà?
Book II, Ch. 12
Essais (1595), Book II

Immanuel Kant Foto

„All our knowledge falls with the bounds of experience.“

—  Immanuel Kant, buch Critique of Pure Reason

A 146, B 185
Critique of Pure Reason (1781; 1787)

Henry Van Dyke Foto
George Orwell Foto

„The majority of pacifists either belong to obscure religious sects or are simply humanitarians who object to taking life and prefer not to follow their thoughts beyond that point.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950

"Notes on Nationalism" (1945)
Kontext: The majority of pacifists either belong to obscure religious sects or are simply humanitarians who object to taking life and prefer not to follow their thoughts beyond that point. But there is a minority of intellectual pacifists, whose real though unacknowledged motive appears to be hatred of western democracy and admiration for totalitarianism. Pacifist propaganda usually boils down to saying that one side is as bad as the other, but if one looks closely at the writing of the younger intellectual pacifists, one finds that they do not by any means express impartial disapproval but are directed almost entirely against Britain and the United States. Moreover they do not as a rule condemn violence as such, but only violence used in defence of western countries. The Russians, unlike the British, are not blamed for defending themselves by warlike means, and indeed all pacifist propaganda of this type avoids mention of Russia or China. It is not claimed, again, that the Indians should abjure violence in their struggle against the British. Pacifist literature abounds with equivocal remarks which, if they mean anything, appear to mean that statesmen of the type of Hitler are preferable to those of the type of Churchill, and that violence is perhaps excusable if it is violent enough. After the fall of France, the French pacifists, faced by a real choice which their English colleagues have not had to make, mostly went over to the Nazis, and in England there appears to have been some small overlap of membership between the Peace Pledge Union and the Blackshirts. Pacifist writers have written in praise of Carlyle, one of the intellectual fathers of Fascism. All in all it is difficult not to feel that pacifism, as it appears among a section of the intelligentsia, is secretly inspired by an admiration for power and successful cruelty.

Arthur C. Clarke Foto

„Whatever godlike powers and principalities lurked beyond the stars, Poole reminded himself, for ordinary humans only two things were important - Love and Death.“

—  Arthur C. Clarke British science fiction writer, science writer, inventor, undersea explorer, and television series host 1917 - 2008

1990s, 3001: The Final Odyssey (1997), p. 87

Alexis Karpouzos Foto

Ähnliche Themen