Zitate von Leo Strauss

0   0

Leo Strauss

Geburtstag: 20. September 1899
Todesdatum: 18. Oktober 1973

Werbung

Leo Strauss war ein deutschamerikanischer Philosoph. Als Professor für Politische Philosophie lehrte er von 1949 bis 1969 an der University of Chicago. Strauss gilt als Begründer einer einflussreichen Denkschule – der Straussianer – und als Kritiker der modernen Philosophie sowie des modernen liberalen Denkens überhaupt.

Ähnliche Autoren

Herbert Marcuse Foto
Herbert Marcuse13
deutsch-amerikanischer Philosoph und Soziologe
Max Stirner Foto
Max Stirner30
deutscher Philosoph
Andreas Weber Foto
Andreas Weber6
deutscher Biologe, Philosoph, Publizist
Robert Spaemann Foto
Robert Spaemann10
deutscher Philosoph
 Novalis Foto
Novalis92
deutscher Dichter der Frühromantik
Kurt Huber Foto
Kurt Huber9
deutscher Volksliedforscher, Professor an der Ludwig-Maximi…
Ernst Bloch Foto
Ernst Bloch17
deutscher marxistischer Philosoph
August Julius Langbehn Foto
August Julius Langbehn8
deutscher Schriftsteller und Kulturkritiker
Hans-Georg Gadamer Foto
Hans-Georg Gadamer9
deutscher Philosoph

Zitate Leo Strauss

„Only a great fool would call the new political science diabolic: it has no attributes peculiar to fallen angels. It is not even Machiavellian, for Machiavelli's teaching was graceful, subtle, and colorful.“

—  Leo Strauss
Liberalism Ancient and Modern (1968), Context: Only a great fool would call the new political science diabolic: it has no attributes peculiar to fallen angels. It is not even Machiavellian, for Machiavelli's teaching was graceful, subtle, and colorful. Nor is it Neronian. Nevertheless one may say of it that it fiddles while Rome burns. It is excused by two facts: it does not know that it fiddles, and it does not know that Rome burns. p. 223

„The truth of the ultimate mystery — the truth that there is an ultimate mystery, that being is radically mysterious — cannot be denied even by the unbelieving Jew of our age.“

—  Leo Strauss
Context: The kingdom is Yours, and You will reign in glory for all eternity. As it is written in Your Torah: "The Lord shall reign for ever and ever." And it is said: " And the Lord shall be King over all the earth: on that day the Lord shall be One, and His name One." No nobler dream was ever dreamt. It is surely nobler to be a victim of the most noble dream than to profit from a sordid reality and to wallow in it. Dream is akin to aspiration. And aspiration is a kind of divination of an enigmatic vision. And an enigmatic vision in the emphatic sense is the perception of the ultimate mystery, of the truth of the ultimate mystery. The truth of the ultimate mystery — the truth that there is an ultimate mystery, that being is radically mysterious — cannot be denied even by the unbelieving Jew of our age. That unbelieving Jew of our age, if he has any education, is ordinarily a positivist, a believer in Science, if not a positivist without any education. Commenting upon the Aleinu prayer, in "Why We Remain Jews" (1962)

Werbung

„Men are constantly attracted and deluded by two opposite charms: the charm of competence which is engendered by mathematics and everything akin to mathematics, and the charm of humble awe, which is engendered by meditation on the human soul and its experiences. Philosophy is characterized by the gentle, if firm, refusal to succumb to either charm.“

—  Leo Strauss
What is Political Philosophy (1959), Context: Men are constantly attracted and deluded by two opposite charms: the charm of competence which is engendered by mathematics and everything akin to mathematics, and the charm of humble awe, which is engendered by meditation on the human soul and its experiences. Philosophy is characterized by the gentle, if firm, refusal to succumb to either charm. It is the highest form of the mating of courage and moderation. In spite of its highness or nobility, it could appear as Sisyphean or ugly, when one contrasts its achievement with its goal. Yet it is necessarily accompanied, sustained and elevated by eros. It is graced by nature's grace. p. 40

„Science is susceptible of infinite progress. But how can science be susceptible of infinite progress if its object does not have an inner infinity?“

—  Leo Strauss
Context: Science, as the positivist understands it, is susceptible of infinite progress. That you learn in every elementary school today, I believe. Every result of science is provisional and subject to future revision, and this will never change. In other words, fifty thousand years from now there will still be results entirely different from those now, but still subject to revision. Science is susceptible of infinite progress. But how can science be susceptible of infinite progress if its object does not have an inner infinity? The belief admitted by all believers in science today — that science is by its nature essentially progressive, and eternally progressive — implies, without saying it, that being is mysterious. And here is the point where the two lines I have tried to trace do not meet exactly, but where they come within hailing distance. And, I believe, to expect more in a general way, of people in general, would be unreasonable. "Why We Remain Jews" (1962)

„It is safer to try to understand the low in the light of the high than the high in the light of the low.“

—  Leo Strauss
Liberalism Ancient and Modern (1968), Context: It is safer to try to understand the low in the light of the high than the high in the light of the low. In doing the latter one necessarily distorts the high, whereas in doing the former one does not deprive the low of the freedom to reveal itself as fully as what it is. p. 225

„It is excused by two facts: it does not know that it fiddles, and it does not know that Rome burns.“

—  Leo Strauss
Liberalism Ancient and Modern (1968), Context: Only a great fool would call the new political science diabolic: it has no attributes peculiar to fallen angels. It is not even Machiavellian, for Machiavelli's teaching was graceful, subtle, and colorful. Nor is it Neronian. Nevertheless one may say of it that it fiddles while Rome burns. It is excused by two facts: it does not know that it fiddles, and it does not know that Rome burns. p. 223

„All political action is then guided by some thought of better or worse.“

—  Leo Strauss
Context: All political action aims at either preservation or change. When desiring to preserve, we wish to prevent a change for the worse; when desiring to change, we wish to bring about something better. All political action is then guided by some thought of better or worse. "What Is Political Philosophy" in The Journal of Politics, 19(3) (Aug. 1957) by the Southern Political Science Association, p. 343

„All political action aims at either preservation or change.“

—  Leo Strauss
Context: All political action aims at either preservation or change. When desiring to preserve, we wish to prevent a change for the worse; when desiring to change, we wish to bring about something better. All political action is then guided by some thought of better or worse. "What Is Political Philosophy" in The Journal of Politics, 19(3) (Aug. 1957) by the Southern Political Science Association, p. 343

„We are seekers for wisdom, philo-sophoi.“

—  Leo Strauss
Context: We are confronted with the incompatible claims of Jerusalem and Athens to our allegiance. We are open to both and willing to listen to each. We ourselves are not wise but we wish to become wise. We are seekers for wisdom, philo-sophoi. Athens and Jerusalem : Some Preliminary Reflections in Studies in Platonic Political Philosophy (1985), p. 149

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„No nobler dream was ever dreamt. It is surely nobler to be a victim of the most noble dream than to profit from a sordid reality and to wallow in it.“

—  Leo Strauss
Context: The kingdom is Yours, and You will reign in glory for all eternity. As it is written in Your Torah: "The Lord shall reign for ever and ever." And it is said: " And the Lord shall be King over all the earth: on that day the Lord shall be One, and His name One." No nobler dream was ever dreamt. It is surely nobler to be a victim of the most noble dream than to profit from a sordid reality and to wallow in it. Dream is akin to aspiration. And aspiration is a kind of divination of an enigmatic vision. And an enigmatic vision in the emphatic sense is the perception of the ultimate mystery, of the truth of the ultimate mystery. The truth of the ultimate mystery — the truth that there is an ultimate mystery, that being is radically mysterious — cannot be denied even by the unbelieving Jew of our age. That unbelieving Jew of our age, if he has any education, is ordinarily a positivist, a believer in Science, if not a positivist without any education. Commenting upon the Aleinu prayer, in "Why We Remain Jews" (1962)

„Philosophy has to grant that revelation is possible. But to grant that revelation is possible means to grant that philosophy is perhaps something infinitely unimportant.“

—  Leo Strauss
Natural Right and History (1953), Context: Philosophy has to grant that revelation is possible. But to grant that revelation is possible means to grant that philosophy is perhaps something infinitely unimportant. To grant that revelation is possible means to grant that the philosophic life is not necessarily, not evidently, the right life. Philosophy, the life devoted to the quest for evident knowledge available to man as man, would itself rest on an unevident, arbitrary, or blind decision. This would merely confirm the thesis of faith, that there is no possibility of consistency, of a consistent and thoroughly sincere life, without belief in revelation. The mere fact that philosophy and revelation cannot refute each other would constitute the refutation of philosophy by revelation. p. 75

„Democracy, in a word, is meant to be an aristocracy which has broadened into a universal aristocracy.“

—  Leo Strauss
Liberalism Ancient and Modern (1968), Context: It was once said that democracy is the regime that stands or falls by virtue: a democracy is a regime in which all or most adults are men of virtue, and since virtue seems to require wisdom, a regime in which all or most adults are virtuous and wise, or the society in which all or most adults have developed their reason to a high degree, or the rational society. Democracy, in a word, is meant to be an aristocracy which has broadened into a universal aristocracy. … There exists a whole science—the science which I among thousands of others profess to teach, political science—which so to speak has no other theme than the contrast between the original conception of democracy, or what one may call the ideal of democracy, and democracy as it is. … Liberal education is the ladder by which we try to ascend from mass democracy to democracy as originally meant. “What is liberal education,” pp. 4-5

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Die heutige Jubiläen
David Lynch Foto
David Lynch8
US-amerikanischer Regisseur 1946
Jewgeni Iwanowitsch Samjatin Foto
Jewgeni Iwanowitsch Samjatin
russischer Revolutionär und Schriftsteller 1884 - 1937
Barbara Stanwyck Foto
Barbara Stanwyck
US-amerikanische Schauspielerin 1907 - 1990
Carl August Emge Foto
Carl August Emge2
deutscher Rechtsphilosoph 1886 - 1970
Weitere 68 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Herbert Marcuse Foto
Herbert Marcuse13
deutsch-amerikanischer Philosoph und Soziologe
Max Stirner Foto
Max Stirner30
deutscher Philosoph
Andreas Weber Foto
Andreas Weber6
deutscher Biologe, Philosoph, Publizist
Robert Spaemann Foto
Robert Spaemann10
deutscher Philosoph