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Inazō Nitobe

Geburtstag: 1. September 1862
Todesdatum: 15. Oktober 1933

Nitobe Inazō war ein japanischer Agrarwissenschaftler, Philosoph, Pädagoge, Autor und ein internationaler politischer Aktivist.

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„Ritterlichkeit ist eine Blume, die auf dem Boden Japans nicht weniger heimisch ist als ihr Symbol, die Kirschblüte. Sie ist kein vertrocknetes Blatt einer uralten Tugend, die im Herbarium unserer Geschichte verwahrt wird, sondern ein lebendiges Etwas von Schönheit und Macht, das unter uns weilt.“ Bushido

„What is important is to try to develop insights and wisdom rather than mere knowledge, respect someone's character rather than his learning, and nurture men of character rather than mere talents.“


„Knowledge becomes really such only when it is assimilated in the mind of the learner and shows in his character.“ Bushido: The Soul of Japan. A Classic Essay on Samurai Ethics

„A truly brave man is ever serene; he is never taken by surprise; nothing ruffles the equanimity of his spirit. In the heat of battle he remains cool; in the midst of catastrophes he keeps level his mind. Earthquakes do not shake him, he laughs at storms. We admire him as truly great, who, in the menacing presence of danger or death, retains his self-possession; who, for instance, can compose a poem under impending peril or hum a strain in the face of death. Such indulgence betraying no tremor in the writing or in the voice, is taken as an infallible index of a large nature—of what we call a capacious mind (Yoyū), which, far from being pressed or crowded, has always room for something more.“ Bushido, The Soul Of Japan

„the feeling of distress is the root of benevolence, therefore a benevolent man is ever mindful of those who are suffering and in distress.“ Bushido, the Soul of Japan

„If there is anything to do, there is certainly a best way to do it, and the best way is both the most economical and the most graceful.“

„Did not Socrates, all the while he unflinchingly refused to concede one iota of loyalty to his daemon, obey with equal fidelity and equanimity the command of his earthly master, the State? His conscience he followed, alive; his country he served, dying. Alack the day when a state grows so powerful as to demand of its citizens the dictates of their consciences!“ Bushido: The Soul of Japan. A Classic Essay on Samurai Ethics

„Beneath the instinct to fight there lurks a diviner instinct to love.“ Bushido: The Soul of Japan. A Classic Essay on Samurai Ethics


„The Yamato spirit is not a tame, tender plant, but a wild--in the sense of natural--growth; it is indigenous to the soil; its accidental qualities it may share with the flowers of other lands, but in its essence it remains the original, spontaneous outgrowth of our clime. But its nativity is not its sole claim to our affection. The refinement and grace of its beauty appeal to our æsthetic sense as no other flower can. We cannot share the admiration of the Europeans for their roses, which lack the simplicity of our flower. Then, too, the thorns that are hidden beneath the sweetness of the rose, the tenacity with which she clings to life, as though loth or afraid to die rather than drop untimely, preferring to rot on her stem; her showy colours and heavy odours--all these are traits so unlike our flower, which carries no dagger or poison under its beauty, which is ever ready to depart life at the call of nature, whose colours are never gorgeous, and whose light fragrance never palls. Beauty of colour and of form is limited in its showing; it is a fixed quality of existence, whereas fragrance is volatile, ethereal as the breathing of life. So in all religious ceremonies frankincense and myrrh play a prominent part. There is something spirituelle in redolence. When the delicious perfume of the sakura quickens the morning air, as the sun in its course rises to illumine first the isles of the Far East, few sensations are more serenely exhilarating than to inhale, as it were, the very breath of beauteous day.“ Bushido, the Soul of Japan

„Tranquillity is courage in repose. It is a statical manifestation of valor, as daring deeds are a dynamical. A truly brave man is ever serene; he is never taken by surprise; nothing ruffles the equanimity of his spirit.“ Bushido, the Soul of Japan

„A samurai was essentially a man of action.“ Bushido, The Soul Of Japan

„When men's fowls and dogs are lost, they know to seek for them again, but they lose their mind and do not know to seek for it.“ Bushido, the Soul of Japan


„Tranquillity is courage in repose.“ Bushido, the Soul of Japan

„Chivalry is itself the poetry of life." —SCHLEGEL, Philosophy of History.“ Bushido, the Soul of Japan

„When the delicious perfume of the sakura quickens the morning air, as the sun in its course rises to illumine first the isles of the Far East, few sensations are more serenely exhilarating than to inhale, as it were, the very breath of beauteous day.“ Bushido the Soul of Japan: Illustrated

„Filial Piety, which is considered one of the two wheels of the chariot of Japanese ethics—Loyalty being the other.“ Bushido, the Soul of Japan