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Francois Rabelais

Geburtstag: 1494
Todesdatum: 9. April 1553

François Rabelais [fʁɑ̃.swa ʁa.blɛ] war ein französischer Schriftsteller der Renaissance, Humanist, römisch-katholischer Ordensbruder und praktizierender Arzt.

Werk

Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua und Pantagruel
Francois Rabelais

Zitate Francois Rabelais

„Der Hunger kommt beim Essen […]; aber der Durst vergeht beim Trinken.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Die muntern Reden der Bezechten. In: Gargantua und Pantagruel, Buch 1, Kap. 5. Deutsch von Walter Widmer (1903-1965). Berlin: Rütten & Loening, 1970. Band 1, S. 33 Original franz.: "L'appétit vient en mangeant; la soif s'en va en buvant."

„Lasst den Vorhang herunter; die Farce ist zu Ende.“

—  Francois Rabelais
Letzte Worte, 9. April 1553 Original franz.: "Tirez le rideau, la farce est jouée."

„Die Stunden sind für den Menschen da und nicht der Mensch für die Stunden.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Bruder Hannes in: F. Rabelais: Gargantua und Pantagruel. München, Biederstein Verlag 1951, S.122. Original franz.: "Les heures sont faites pour l'homme, et non l'homme pour les heures."

„Time, which gnaws and diminisheth all things else, augments and increaseth benefits; because a noble action of liberality, done to a man of reason, doth grow continually by his generous thinking of it and remembering it.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: Time, which gnaws and diminisheth all things else, augments and increaseth benefits; because a noble action of liberality, done to a man of reason, doth grow continually by his generous thinking of it and remembering it. Being unwilling therefore any way to degenerate from the hereditary mildness and clemency of my parents, I do now forgive you, deliver you from all fines and imprisonments, fully release you, set you at liberty, and every way make you as frank and free as ever you were before. Chapter 50 : Gargantua's speech to the vanquished.

„The Lord celestial
Hath given enough wherewith to please us all.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: Alluring, courtly, comely, fine, complete, Wise, personable, ravishing, and sweet, Come joys enjoy. The Lord celestial Hath given enough wherewith to please us all. Chapter 54 : The inscription set upon the great gate of Theleme.

„Following his example, I encourage all these diabolical calumniators to go hang themselves before the last moon's quarter is done. I will supply the rope.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Fourth Book (1548, 1552), A son [Timon le Misanthrope] exemple ie denonce à ces calumniateurs diaboliques, que tous ayent à se pendre dedans le dernier chanteau de ceste lune. Ie les fourniray de licolz. Prologue of the 1548 "old" edition.

„Come, settle here a charitable faith,
Which neighbourly affection nourisheth.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: p>Here enter you, pure, honest, faithful, true Expounders of the Scriptures old and new. Whose glosses do not blind our reason, but Make it to see the clearer, and who shut Its passages from hatred, avarice, Pride, factions, covenants, and all sort of vice. Come, settle here a charitable faith, Which neighbourly affection nourisheth. And whose light chaseth all corrupters hence, Of the blest word, from the aforesaid sense.The holy sacred Word, May it always afford T' us all in common, Both man and woman, A spiritual shield and sword, The holy sacred Word.</p Chapter 54 : The inscription set upon the great gate of Theleme.

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„Here enter not attorneys, barristers,
Nor bridle-champing law-practitioners:
Clerks, commissaries, scribes, nor pharisees,
Wilful disturbers of the people's ease:
Judges, destroyers, with an unjust breath,
Of honest men, like dogs, even unto death.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: Here enter not attorneys, barristers, Nor bridle-champing law-practitioners: Clerks, commissaries, scribes, nor pharisees, Wilful disturbers of the people's ease: Judges, destroyers, with an unjust breath, Of honest men, like dogs, even unto death. Your salary is at the gibbet-foot: Go drink there! for we do not here fly out On those excessive courses, which may draw A waiting on your courts by suits in law. Chapter 54 : The inscription set upon the great gate of Theleme.

„I do now forgive you, deliver you from all fines and imprisonments, fully release you, set you at liberty, and every way make you as frank and free as ever you were before.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: Time, which gnaws and diminisheth all things else, augments and increaseth benefits; because a noble action of liberality, done to a man of reason, doth grow continually by his generous thinking of it and remembering it. Being unwilling therefore any way to degenerate from the hereditary mildness and clemency of my parents, I do now forgive you, deliver you from all fines and imprisonments, fully release you, set you at liberty, and every way make you as frank and free as ever you were before. Chapter 50 : Gargantua's speech to the vanquished.

„Believe it, if you will, or otherwise, believe it not, I care not which of them you do, they are both alike to me. It shall be sufficient for my purpose to have told you the truth, and the truth I will tell you.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Third Book (1546), Context: I have already related to you great and admirable things; but, if you might be induced to adventure upon the hazard of believing some other divinity of this sacred Pantagruelion, I very willingly would tell it you. Believe it, if you will, or otherwise, believe it not, I care not which of them you do, they are both alike to me. It shall be sufficient for my purpose to have told you the truth, and the truth I will tell you. Chapter 52 : How a certain kind of Pantagruelion is of that nature that the fire is not able to consume it

„Out-strouting cluster-fists, contentious bulls,
Fomenters of divisions and debates,
Elsewhere, not here, make sale of your deceits.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: Here enter not vile bigots, hypocrites, Externally devoted apes, base snites, Puffed-up, wry-necked beasts, worse than the Huns, Or Ostrogoths, forerunners of baboons: Cursed snakes, dissembled varlets, seeming sancts, Slipshod caffards, beggars pretending wants, Fat chuffcats, smell-feast knockers, doltish gulls, Out-strouting cluster-fists, contentious bulls, Fomenters of divisions and debates, Elsewhere, not here, make sale of your deceits. Chapter 54 : The inscription set upon the great gate of Theleme

„Here enter you, pure, honest, faithful, true
Expounders of the Scriptures old and new.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: p>Here enter you, pure, honest, faithful, true Expounders of the Scriptures old and new. Whose glosses do not blind our reason, but Make it to see the clearer, and who shut Its passages from hatred, avarice, Pride, factions, covenants, and all sort of vice. Come, settle here a charitable faith, Which neighbourly affection nourisheth. And whose light chaseth all corrupters hence, Of the blest word, from the aforesaid sense.The holy sacred Word, May it always afford T' us all in common, Both man and woman, A spiritual shield and sword, The holy sacred Word.</p Chapter 54 : The inscription set upon the great gate of Theleme.

„In all their rule, and strictest tie of their order, there was but this one clause to be observed,“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: All their life was spent not in laws, statutes, or rules, but according to their own free will and pleasure. They rose out of their beds when they thought good : they did eat, drink, labour, sleep, when they had a mind to it, and were disposed for it. None did awake them, none did offer to constrain them to eat, drink, nor to do any other thing; for so had Gargantua established it. In all their rule, and strictest tie of their order, there was but this one clause to be observed Chapter 58 : A prophetical Riddle.

„Then shall you many gallant men see by
Valour stirr'd up, and youthful fervency,
Who, trusting too much in their hopeful time,
Live but a while, and perish in their prime.
Neither shall any, who this course shall run,
Leave off the race which he hath once begun,
Till they the heavens with noise by their contention
Have fill'd, and with their steps the earth's dimension.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: Then shall you many gallant men see by Valour stirr'd up, and youthful fervency, Who, trusting too much in their hopeful time, Live but a while, and perish in their prime. Neither shall any, who this course shall run, Leave off the race which he hath once begun, Till they the heavens with noise by their contention Have fill'd, and with their steps the earth's dimension. Then those shall have no less authority, That have no faith, than those that will not lie; For all shall be governed by a rude, Base, ignorant, and foolish multitude; The veriest lout of all shall be their judge, O horrible and dangerous deluge! Chapter 58 : A prophetical Riddle-->

„The probity that scintillizes in the superfices of your persons informs my ratiocinating faculty, in a most stupendous manner, of the radiant virtues latent within the precious caskets and ventricles of your minds.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Fifth Book (1564), Context: The probity that scintillizes in the superfices of your persons informs my ratiocinating faculty, in a most stupendous manner, of the radiant virtues latent within the precious caskets and ventricles of your minds. For, contemplating the mellifluous suavity of your thrice discreet reverences, it is impossible not to be persuaded with facility that neither your affections nor your intellects are vitiated with any defect or privation of liberal and exalted sciences. Far from it, all must judge that in you are lodged a cornucopia and encyclopaedia, an unmeasurable profundity of knowledge in the most peregrine and sublime disciplines, so frequently the admiration, and so rarely the concomitants of the imperite vulgar. This gently compels me, who in preceding times indefatigably kept my private affections absolutely subjugated, to condescend to make my application to you in the trivial phrase of the plebeian world, and assure you that you are well, more than most heartily welcome. Queen Whims, or Queen Quintessence, in Ch. 20 : How the Quintessence cured the sick with a song

„Comrades and fellow-soldiers, we have here met with an encounter, and they are ten times in number more than we. Shall we charge them or no?“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: Being come down from thence towards Seville, they were heard by Gargantua, who said then unto those that were with him, Comrades and fellow-soldiers, we have here met with an encounter, and they are ten times in number more than we. Shall we charge them or no? What a devil, said the monk, shall we do else? Do you esteem men by their number rather than by their valour and prowess? With this he cried out, Charge, devils, charge! Which when the enemies heard, they thought certainly that they had been very devils, and therefore even then began all of them to run away as hard as they could drive, Drawforth only excepted, who immediately settled his lance on its rest, and therewith hit the monk with all his force on the very middle of his breast, but, coming against his horrific frock, the point of the iron being with the blow either broke off or blunted, it was in matter of execution as if you had struck against an anvil with a little wax-candle. Chapter 43.

„As soon as he was born, he cried not as other babes use to do, Miez, miez, miez, miez, but with a high, sturdy, and big voice shouted about, Some drink, some drink, some drink, as inviting all the world to drink with him.“

—  Francois Rabelais, buch Gargantua und Pantagruel
Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–1564), Gargantua (1534), Context: As soon as he was born, he cried not as other babes use to do, Miez, miez, miez, miez, but with a high, sturdy, and big voice shouted about, Some drink, some drink, some drink, as inviting all the world to drink with him. The noise hereof was so extremely great, that it was heard in both the countries at once of Beauce and Bibarois. I doubt me, that you do not thoroughly believe the truth of this strange nativity. Though you believe it not, I care not much: but an honest man, and of good judgment, believeth still what is told him, and that which he finds written. Chapter 6 : How Gargantua was born in a strange manner.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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