Zitate von Caspar David Friedrich

Caspar David Friedrich Foto
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Caspar David Friedrich

Geburtstag: 5. September 1774
Todesdatum: 7. Mai 1840

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Caspar David Friedrich war ein deutscher Maler, Grafiker und Zeichner. Er gilt heute als der bedeutendste Künstler der deutschen Frühromantik. Mit seinen auf die Wirkungsästhetik ausgerichteten, konstruierten Bilderfindungen, die den geläufigen Vorstellungen einer romantischen Malerei als gefühlige Ausdruckskunst widersprechen, leistete er einen originären Beitrag zur modernen Kunst. In den Hauptwerken Friedrichs wird in revolutionärer Weise der Bruch mit den Traditionen der Landschaftsmalerei von Barock und Klassizismus vollzogen. Der Themen- und Motivkanon dieser Bilder vereinigt Landschaft und Religion vorzugsweise zu Allegorien von Einsamkeit, Tod, Jenseitsvorstellungen und Erlösungshoffnungen. Friedrichs von Melancholie geprägtes Welt- und Selbstverständnis wird als exemplarisch für das Künstlerbild in der Epoche der Romantik gesehen. Der Maler macht mit seinen Werken bei weitgehend unbekannten Bildkontexten sinnoffene Angebote, die den Betrachter mit seiner angesprochenen Gefühlswelt in den Deutungsprozess einbeziehen. Die Sinnoffenheit der Bilder führte seit der Wiederentdeckung Friedrichs zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts zu einer Vielzahl oft grundsätzlich verschiedener Interpretationen sowie zur Theoriebildung aus kunstwissenschaftlicher, philosophischer, literaturwissenschaftlicher, psychologischer oder theologischer Sicht.

Zitate Caspar David Friedrich

„A picture must not be invented but felt. Observe the form exactly, both the smallest and the large and do not separate the small from the large, but rather the trivial from the important.“

— Caspar David Friedrich
Context: Close your bodily eye, so that you may see your picture first with the spiritual eye. Then bring to the light of day that which you have seen in the darkness so that it may react upon others from the outside inwards. A picture must not be invented but felt. Observe the form exactly, both the smallest and the large and do not separate the small from the large, but rather the trivial from the important. Variant translation: Close your bodily eye, that you may see your picture first with the eye of the spirit. Then bring to light what you have seen in the darkness, that its effect may work back, from without to within. Quoted in The Romantic Imagination: Literature and Art in England and Germany (1996) by Fredrick Berwick and Jürgn Klein, and in [http://www.bitsofnews.com/content/view/154/42/ "Culture: Caspar D. Friedrich and the Wasteland" by Gjermund E. Jansen in Bits of News (3 March 2005)]

„Close your bodily eye, so that you may see your picture first with the spiritual eye.“

— Caspar David Friedrich
Context: Close your bodily eye, so that you may see your picture first with the spiritual eye. Then bring to the light of day that which you have seen in the darkness so that it may react upon others from the outside inwards. A picture must not be invented but felt. Observe the form exactly, both the smallest and the large and do not separate the small from the large, but rather the trivial from the important. Variant translation: Close your bodily eye, that you may see your picture first with the eye of the spirit. Then bring to light what you have seen in the darkness, that its effect may work back, from without to within. Quoted in The Romantic Imagination: Literature and Art in England and Germany (1996) by Fredrick Berwick and Jürgn Klein, and in [http://www.bitsofnews.com/content/view/154/42/ "Culture: Caspar D. Friedrich and the Wasteland" by Gjermund E. Jansen in Bits of News (3 March 2005)]

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„I must stay alone and know that I am alone to contemplate and feel nature in full; I have to surrender myself to what encircles me, I have to merge with my clouds and rocks in order to be what I am.“

— Caspar David Friedrich
Context: I must stay alone and know that I am alone to contemplate and feel nature in full; I have to surrender myself to what encircles me, I have to merge with my clouds and rocks in order to be what I am. Solitude is indispensible for my dialogue with nature. Quote of Friedrich, 1821; as cited in Authenticity and Fiction in the Russian Literary Journey, 1790-1840 (2000) by Andreas Schönle, p. 108, from memoirs of Vasily Zhukovsky <!-- "Pis'ma k velikoi kniagine" p. 391--> Variant translation: I have to stay alone in order to fully contemplate and feel nature. This answer of Friedrich is recorded by Vasily Zhukovsky who asked the painter in 1821 to travel together to Switzerland

„The artist should not only paint what he sees before him, but also what he sees in himself. If, however, he sees nothing within him, then he should also refrain from painting what he sees before him.“

— Caspar David Friedrich
Context: The artist should not only paint what he sees before him, but also what he sees in himself. If, however, he sees nothing within him, then he should also refrain from painting what he sees before him. Otherwise his pictures will be like those folding screens behind which one expects to find only the sick or the dead. Quote from [http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,908926-1,00.html "The Awe-Struck Witness" in TIME magazine (28 October 1974)] and in "On the Brink: The Artist and the Seas" by Eldon N. Van Liere in Poetics of the Elements in the Human Condition: The Sea (1985) ed. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka Variant translations: The artist should not only paint what he sees before him, but also what he sees within him. If, however, he sees nothing within him, then he should also omit to paint that which he sees before him. As quoted in German Romantic Painting (1994) by William Vaughan, p. 68

„The divine is everywhere, even in a grain of sand“

— Caspar David Friedrich
Context: The divine is everywhere, even in a grain of sand; there I represented it in the reeds. Quote of Friedrich on his painting Swans in the Rushes (c. 1820), as cited in [http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3768/is_200401/ai_n9377557/print "Absent Presences in Liminal Places: Murnau's Nosferatu and the Otherworld of Stoker's Dracula" by Saviour Catania in Literature Film Quarterly (2004)]

„All authentic art is conceived at a sacred moment and nourished in a blessed hour; an inner impulse creates it, often without the artist being aware of it.“

— Caspar David Friedrich
Context: The pure, frank sentiments we hold in our hearts are the only truthful sources of art. A painting which does not take its inspiration from the heart is nothing more than futile juggling. All authentic art is conceived at a sacred moment and nourished in a blessed hour; an inner impulse creates it, often without the artist being aware of it. Quote in [http://www.bitsofnews.com/content/view/154/42/ 'Culture: Caspar D. Friedrich and the Wasteland', by Gjermund E. Jansen in Bits of News (3 March 2005)] Variant translation: The heart is the only true source of art, the language of a pure, child-like soul. Any creation not sprung from this origin can only be artifice. Every true work of art is conceived in a hallowed hour and born in a happy one, from an impulse in the artist's heart, often without his knowledge. (as quoted in the article 'Caspar David Friedrich's Medieval Burials', Karl Whittington - [http://www.19thc-artworldwide.org/spring12/whittington-on-caspar-david-friedrichs-medieval-burials])

„The pure, frank sentiments we hold in our hearts are the only truthful sources of art.“

— Caspar David Friedrich
Context: The pure, frank sentiments we hold in our hearts are the only truthful sources of art. A painting which does not take its inspiration from the heart is nothing more than futile juggling. All authentic art is conceived at a sacred moment and nourished in a blessed hour; an inner impulse creates it, often without the artist being aware of it. Quote in [http://www.bitsofnews.com/content/view/154/42/ 'Culture: Caspar D. Friedrich and the Wasteland', by Gjermund E. Jansen in Bits of News (3 March 2005)] Variant translation: The heart is the only true source of art, the language of a pure, child-like soul. Any creation not sprung from this origin can only be artifice. Every true work of art is conceived in a hallowed hour and born in a happy one, from an impulse in the artist's heart, often without his knowledge. (as quoted in the article 'Caspar David Friedrich's Medieval Burials', Karl Whittington - [http://www.19thc-artworldwide.org/spring12/whittington-on-caspar-david-friedrichs-medieval-burials])

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„Alas, the blue arc of heaven / Is covered with gloomy clouds, / And the bright radiance of the sun / Is completely hidden
See the terrifying force of the tempest / Bows the oaks so that is groans, / And the rose on the beautiful pasture / has ben bent down by the rain.“

— Caspar David Friedrich
some poetry lines of Friedrich, c. 1807-09; as cited by C. D. Eberlein in C. D. Friedrich Bekenntnisse, p 57; as quoted and translated by Linda Siegel in Caspar David Friedrich and the Age of German Romanticism, Boston Branden Press Publishers, 1978, p. 52

„Through the gloomy clouds break / Blue sky, sunshine, / On the heights and in the valley / Sing the lark and the nightingale
God, I thank you that I live / Not forever in this world / Strengthen me that my soul rise / Upward toward your firmament.“

— Caspar David Friedrich
some poetry lines of Friedrich, c. 1802-05; as cited by C. D. Eberlein in C. D. Friedrich Bekenntnisse, p 57; as quoted & translated by Linda Siegel in Caspar David Friedrich and the Age of German Romanticism, Boston Branden Press Publishers, 1978, p. 48

„Why, the question is often asked of me
Do you choose as subjects for painting
So often death, perishing and the grave?
In order to one day live eternally
One must often submit oneself to death.“

— Caspar David Friedrich
(in original language - German: Warum, die Frag' ist oft zu mir ergangen / Wählst du zum Gegenstand der Malerei / So oft den Tod, Vergänglichkeit und Grab? / Um ewig einst zu leben / Muss man sich oft dem Tod ergeben.) Quote c. 1812; from Caspar David Friedrich, William Vaughn; London: Tate Gallery, 1972, p. 16–17

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