Zitate von Robert Oppenheimer

Robert Oppenheimer Foto
0  0

Robert Oppenheimer

Geburtstag: 22. April 1904
Todesdatum: 18. Februar 1967
Andere Namen:Julius Robert Oppenheimer

Werbung

Julius Robert Oppenheimer war ein amerikanischer theoretischer Physiker deutsch-jüdischer Abstammung, der vor allem während des Zweiten Weltkriegs für seine Rolle als wissenschaftlicher Leiter des Manhattan-Projekts bekannt wurde. Dieses im geheim gehaltenen Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico stationierte Projekt hatte zum Ziel, die ersten Nuklearwaffen zu entwickeln. Robert Oppenheimer gilt als „Vater der Atombombe“, verurteilte jedoch ihren weiteren Einsatz, nachdem er die Folgen ihres Einsatzes gegen die japanischen Städte Hiroshima und Nagasaki gesehen hatte.

Nach dem Krieg arbeitete Robert Oppenheimer als Berater der neu gegründeten US-amerikanischen Atomenergiebehörde und nutzte diese Position dazu, sich für eine internationale Kontrolle der Kernenergie und gegen ein nukleares Wettrüsten zwischen der Sowjetunion und den Vereinigten Staaten einzusetzen. Nachdem er sich mit seinen politischen Ansichten das Missfallen vieler Politiker während der McCarthy-Ära zugezogen hatte, wurde ihm 1954 die Sicherheitsberechtigung entzogen. Von direkter politischer Einflussnahme ausgeschlossen, setzte er seine Arbeit als Physiker in Forschung und Lehre fort.

Ein Jahrzehnt später wurde Robert Oppenheimer 1963 durch den US-amerikanischen Präsidenten Lyndon B. Johnson als Zeichen seiner politischen Rehabilitierung der Enrico-Fermi-Preis verliehen.

Zitate Robert Oppenheimer

„We do not believe any group of men adequate enough or wise enough to operate without scrutiny or without criticism.“

— Robert Oppenheimer
Context: We do not believe any group of men adequate enough or wise enough to operate without scrutiny or without criticism. We know that the only way to avoid error is to detect it, that the only way to detect it is to be free to enquire. We know that the wages of secrecy are corruption. We know that in secrecy error, undetected, will flourish and subvert. "Encouragement of Science" (Address at Science Talent Institute, 6 Mar 1950), Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, v.7, #1 (Jan 1951) p. 6-8

Werbung

„I believe that through discipline, though not through discipline alone, we can achieve serenity, and a certain small but precious measure of the freedom from the accidents of incarnation, and charity, and that detachment which preserves the world which it renounces.“

— Robert Oppenheimer
Context: I believe that through discipline, though not through discipline alone, we can achieve serenity, and a certain small but precious measure of the freedom from the accidents of incarnation, and charity, and that detachment which preserves the world which it renounces. I believe that through discipline we can learn to preserve what is essential to our happiness in more and more adverse circumstances, and to abandon with simplicity what would else have seemed to us indispensable; that we come a little to see the world without the gross distortion of personal desire, and in seeing it so, accept more easily our earthly privation and its earthly horror — But because I believe that the reward of discipline is greater than its immediate objective, I would not have you think that discipline without objective is possible: in its nature discipline involves the subjection of the soul to some perhaps minor end; and that end must be real, if the discipline is not to be factitious. Therefore I think that all things which evoke discipline: study, and our duties to men and to the commonwealth, war, and personal hardship, and even the need for subsistence, ought to be greeted by us with profound gratitude, for only through them can we attain to the least detachment; and only so can we know peace. Letter to his brother Frank (12 March 1932), published in Robert Oppenheimer : Letters and Recollections (1995) edited by Alice Kimball Smith, p. 155

„If atomic bombs are to be added as new weapons to the arsenals of a warring world, or to the arsenals of the nations preparing for war, then the time will come when mankind will curse the names of Los Alamos and Hiroshima. The people of this world must unite or they will perish.“

— Robert Oppenheimer
Context: It is with appreciation and gratefulness that I accept from you this scroll for the Los Alamos Laboratory, and for the men and women whose work and whose hearts have made it. It is our hope that in years to come we may look at the scroll and all that it signifies, with pride. Today that pride must be tempered by a profound concern. If atomic bombs are to be added as new weapons to the arsenals of a warring world, or to the arsenals of the nations preparing for war, then the time will come when mankind will curse the names of Los Alamos and Hiroshima. The people of this world must unite or they will perish. This war that has ravaged so much of the earth, has written these words. The atomic bomb has spelled them out for all men to understand. Other men have spoken them in other times, and of other wars, of other weapons. They have not prevailed. There are some misled by a false sense of human history, who hold that they will not prevail today. It is not for us to believe that. By our minds we are committed, committed to a world united, before the common peril, in law and in humanity. Acceptance Speech, Army-Navy "Excellence" Award (16 November 1945)

„There must be no barriers to freedom of inquiry … There is no place for dogma in science. The scientist is free, and must be free to ask any question, to doubt any assertion, to seek for any evidence, to correct any errors.“

— Robert Oppenheimer
Context: There must be no barriers to freedom of inquiry … There is no place for dogma in science. The scientist is free, and must be free to ask any question, to doubt any assertion, to seek for any evidence, to correct any errors. Our political life is also predicated on openness. We know that the only way to avoid error is to detect it and that the only way to detect it is to be free to inquire. And we know that as long as men are free to ask what they must, free to say what they think, free to think what they will, freedom can never be lost, and science can never regress. As quoted in "J. Robert Oppenheimer" by L. Barnett, in Life, Vol. 7, No. 9, International Edition (24 October 1949), p. 58; sometimes a partial version (the final sentence) is misattributed to Marcel Proust.

„In some sort of crude sense which no vulgarity, no humor, no overstatement can quite extinguish, the physicists have known sin; and this is a knowledge which they cannot lose.“

— Robert Oppenheimer
Context: Despite the vision and farseeing wisdom of our wartime heads of state, the physicists have felt the peculiarly intimate responsibility for suggesting, for supporting, and in the end, in large measure, for achieving the realization of atomic weapons. Nor can we forget that these weapons, as they were in fact used, dramatized so mercilessly the inhumanity and evil of modern war. In some sort of crude sense which no vulgarity, no humor, no overstatement can quite extinguish, the physicists have known sin; and this is a knowledge which they cannot lose. Physics in the Contemporary World, Arthur D. Little Memorial Lecture at M.I.T. (25 November 1947)

„To try to be happy is to try to build a machine with no other specification than that it shall run noiselessly.“

— Robert Oppenheimer
Context: Everyone wants rather to be pleasing to women and that desire is not altogether, though it is very largely, a manifestation of vanity. But one cannot aim to be pleasing to women any more than one can aim to have taste, or beauty of expression, or happiness; for these things are not specific aims which one may learn to attain; they are descriptions of the adequacy of one's living. To try to be happy is to try to build a machine with no other specification than that it shall run noiselessly. Letter to his brother Frank (14 October 1929), published in Robert Oppenheimer : Letters and Recollections (1995) edited by Alice Kimball Smith, p. 136

Werbung

„There are children playing in the streets who could solve some of my top problems in physics, because they have modes of sensory perception that I lost long ago.“

— Robert Oppenheimer
Quoted at Vision '65 "New Challenges for Human Communications" (21-23 October 1965) and published in v 65: New Challenges for human communications, Volume 4, International Center for the Typographic Arts, Southern Illinois University (1965), p. 221

„The Optimist thinks this is the best of all possible worlds, the Pessimist fears it is true.“

— Robert Oppenheimer
This is derived from a statement of James Branch Cabell, in The Silver Stallion (1926) : The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true.

Werbung

„It is a profound and necessary truth that the deep things in science are not found because they are useful; they are found because it was possible to find them.“

— Robert Oppenheimer
As quoted in [http://www.math.mun.ca/~edgar/moody.html "Why Curiosity Driven Research?" by Robert V. Moody (17 February 1995)]

„It's not that I don't feel bad about it. It's just that I don't feel worse today than what I felt yesterday.“

— Robert Oppenheimer
Response to question on his feelings about the atomic bombings, while visiting Japan in 1960.

Nächster
Die heutige Jubiläen
Josef Sayer1
deutscher Theologe, Hochschullehrer, Entwicklungshelfer, ... 1941
Alexandre O’Neill
portugiesischer Lyriker irischer Abstammung 1924 - 1986
Elsie Clews Parsons Foto
Elsie Clews Parsons
US-amerikanische Soziologin und Anthropologin 1875 - 1941
Peter Struck Foto
Peter Struck5
deutscher Politiker, MdB 1943 - 2012
Weitere 69 heute Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Hans-Peter Dürr Foto
Hans-Peter Dürr2
deutscher Physiker
 Archimedes Foto
Archimedes2
antiker griechischer Mathematiker, Physiker und Ingenieur
Harald Lesch Foto
Harald Lesch6
deutscher Astrophysiker, Fernsehmoderator und Professor
James Clerk Maxwell Foto
James Clerk Maxwell1
schottischer Physiker
Nikola Tesla Foto
Nikola Tesla1
Erfinder und Physiker
John Malkovich Foto
John Malkovich1
US-amerikanischer Schauspieler und Filmproduzent
Herbert Marcuse Foto
Herbert Marcuse10
deutsch-amerikanischer Philosoph und Soziologe
Norman Vincent Peale Foto
Norman Vincent Peale6
US-amerikanischer Pfarrer und Autor
Heinz von Förster Foto
Heinz von Förster4
österreichischer Physiker und Kybernetiker
Paul Tibbets Foto
Paul Tibbets4
US-amerikanischer Pilot und Soldat