Zitate Randall Jarrell

„The poet writes his poem for its own sake, for the sake of that order of things in which the poem takes the place that has awaited it.“

—  Randall Jarrell

“The Obscurity of the Poet”, p. 24
Poetry and the Age (1953)
Kontext: People always ask: For whom does the poet write? He needs only to answer, For whom do you do good? Are you kind to your daughter because in the end someone will pay you for being?... The poet writes his poem for its own sake, for the sake of that order of things in which the poem takes the place that has awaited it.

„…modern poetry is necessarily obscure; if the reader can’t get it, let him eat Browning…“

—  Randall Jarrell

“Changes of Attitude and Rhetoric in Auden’s Poetry”, p. 149
The Third Book of Criticism (1969)

„The real war poets are always war poets, peace or any time.“

—  Randall Jarrell

"Poetry in War and Peace," Partisan Review (Winter 1945) [p. 129]
Kipling, Auden & Co: Essays and Reviews 1935-1964 (1980)

„One of the most obvious facts about grown-ups to a child is that they have forgotten what it is like to be a child.“

—  Randall Jarrell

"An Unread Book," introduction to The Man Who Loved Children by Christina Stead (Holt, Rinehart, 1965 edition)
General sources

„We are all—so to speak—intellectuals about something.“

—  Randall Jarrell

“The Intellectual in America”, p. 11
A Sad Heart at the Supermarket: Essays & Fables (1962)

„Her point of view about student work was that of a social worker teaching finger-painting to children or the insane.
I was impressed with how common such an attitude was at Benton: the faculty—insofar as they were real Benton faculty, and not just nomadic barbarians—reasoned with the students, “appreciated their point of view”, used Socratic methods on them, made allowances for them, kept looking into the oven to see if they were done; but there was one allowance they never under any circumstances made—that the students might be right about something, and they wrong. Education, to them, was a psychiatric process: the sign under which they conquered had embroidered at the bottom, in small letters, Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased?—and half of them gave it its Babu paraphrase of Can you wait upon a lunatic? One expected them to refer to former students as psychonanalysts do: “Oh, she’s an old analysand of mine.” They felt that the mind was a delicate plant which, carefully nurtured, judiciously left alone, must inevitably adopt for itself even the slightest of their own beliefs.
One Benton student, a girl noted for her beadth of reading and absence of coöperation, described things in a queer, exaggerated, plausible way. According to her, a professor at an ordinary school tells you “what’s so”, you admit that it is on examination, and what you really believe or come to believe has “that obscurity which is the privilege of young things”. But at Benton, where education was as democratic as in “that book about America by that French writer—de, de—you know the one I mean”; she meant de Tocqueville; there at Benton they wanted you really to believe everything they did, especially if they hadn’t told you what it was. You gave them the facts, the opinions of authorities, what you hoped was their own opinion; but they replied, “That’s not the point. What do you yourself really believe?” If it wasn’t what your professors believed, you and they could go on searching for your real belief forever—unless you stumbled at last upon that primal scene which is, by definition, at the root of anything….
When she said primal scene there was so much youth and knowledge in her face, so much of our first joy in created things, that I could not think of Benton for thinking of life. I suppose she was right: it is as hard to satisfy our elders’ demands of Independence as of Dependence. Harder: how much more complicated and indefinite a rationalization the first usually is!—and in both cases, it is their demands that must be satisfied, not our own. The faculty of Benton had for their students great expectations, and the students shook, sometimes gave, beneath the weight of them. If the intellectual demands were not so great as they might have been, the emotional demands made up for it. Many a girl, about to deliver to one of her teachers a final report on a year’s not-quite-completed project, had wanted to cry out like a child, “Whip me, whip me, Mother, just don’t be Reasonable!”“

—  Randall Jarrell, buch Pictures from an Institution

Quelle: Pictures from an Institution (1954) [novel], Chapter 3, pp. 81–83

„The ways we miss our lives are life.“

—  Randall Jarrell

"A Girl in a Library," line 92
The Seven-League Crutches (1951)

„…whether they write poems or don’t write poems, poets are best.“

—  Randall Jarrell

“Recent Poetry”, p. 227
Kipling, Auden & Co: Essays and Reviews 1935-1964 (1980)

„A person is a process, one that leads to death…“

—  Randall Jarrell

“An Unread Book”, p. 40
The Third Book of Criticism (1969)

„…in this world, often, there is nothing to praise but no one to blame…“

—  Randall Jarrell

“On Preparing to Read Kipling”, p. 135
A Sad Heart at the Supermarket: Essays & Fables (1962)

„Let’s say this together: “Great me no greats”, and leave this grading to posterity.“

—  Randall Jarrell

“A Poet’s Own Way”, p. 202
Kipling, Auden & Co: Essays and Reviews 1935-1964 (1980)

Ähnliche Autoren

Allen Ginsberg Foto
Allen Ginsberg10
US-amerikanischer Dichter
Janusz Korczak Foto
Janusz Korczak8
polnischer Arzt, Pädagoge und Kinderbuchautor
Henry Louis Mencken Foto
Henry Louis Mencken33
US-amerikanischer Publizist und Schriftsteller
Eduardo Galeano Foto
Eduardo Galeano3
uruguayischer Journalist, Essayist und Schriftsteller
Charles Bukowski Foto
Charles Bukowski115
US-amerikanischer Dichter und Schriftsteller
Paul Valéry Foto
Paul Valéry5
französischer Philosoph, Essayist, Schriftsteller und Lyrik…
Robert Lee Frost Foto
Robert Lee Frost26
US-amerikanischer Dichter und Pulitzerpreisträger
Khalil Gibran Foto
Khalil Gibran209
libanesischer Künstler und Dichter
George Orwell Foto
George Orwell74
britischer Schriftsteller, Essayist und Journalist
Paul Claudel Foto
Paul Claudel2
französischer Schriftsteller, Dichter und Diplomat
Heutige Jubiläen
Gertrude Stein Foto
Gertrude Stein42
US-amerikanische Schriftstellerin, Verlegerin und Kunstsamm… 1874 - 1946
Cassandra Clare Foto
Cassandra Clare3
US-amerikanische Autorin (Fantasy) 1973
Jean Baudrillard Foto
Jean Baudrillard5
französischer Philosoph und Soziologe 1929 - 2007
Nathanael Greene Foto
Nathanael Greene
US-amerikanischer General 1742 - 1786
Weitere 55 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Allen Ginsberg Foto
Allen Ginsberg10
US-amerikanischer Dichter
Janusz Korczak Foto
Janusz Korczak8
polnischer Arzt, Pädagoge und Kinderbuchautor
Henry Louis Mencken Foto
Henry Louis Mencken33
US-amerikanischer Publizist und Schriftsteller
Eduardo Galeano Foto
Eduardo Galeano3
uruguayischer Journalist, Essayist und Schriftsteller
Charles Bukowski Foto
Charles Bukowski115
US-amerikanischer Dichter und Schriftsteller