Zitate von Kurt Vonnegut

Kurt Vonnegut Foto
3   0

Kurt Vonnegut

Geburtstag: 11. November 1922
Todesdatum: 11. April 2007
Andere Namen: Vonegut, Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. war ein US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller.

Zitate Kurt Vonnegut

„Darum hat Kurt Vonnegut einmal gefragt: "Was ist das für eine Presse, die wir heute haben, wenn man Bücher lesen muss, um zu wissen, was in der Welt passiert?"“

—  Kurt Vonnegut

Armin Wertz: Meister der geheimen Kriege, 22. März 2017 heise.de https://www.heise.de/tp/features/Meister-der-geheimen-Kriege-3650452.html.
"And still on the subject of books: Our daily sources of news, papers and TV, are now so craven, so unvigilant on behalf of the American people, so uninformative, that only in books can we find out what is really going on. I will cite an example: House of Bush, House of Saud by Craig Unger, published near the start of this humiliating, shameful blood-soaked year." - „I Love You, Madame Librarian“. 6. August 2004 inthesetimes.com http://inthesetimes.com/article/903/i_love_you_madame_librarian

„I thought scientists were going to find out exactly how everything worked, and then make it work better.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut

Bennington College address (1970)
Kontext: I thought scientists were going to find out exactly how everything worked, and then make it work better. I fully expected that by the time I was twenty-one, some scientist, maybe my brother, would have taken a color photograph of God Almighty — and sold it to Popular Mechanics magazine.
Scientific truth was going to make us so happy and comfortable. What actually happened when I was twenty-one was that we dropped scientific truth on Hiroshima.

„They were doing their best to live like people invented in story books.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch Breakfast of Champions

Breakfast of Champions (1973)
Kontext: I thought Beatrice Keedsler had joined hands with other old-fashioned storytellers to make people believe that life had leading characters, minor characters, significant details, insignificant details, that it had lessons to be learned, tests to be passed, and a beginning, a middle, and an end.
As I approached my fiftieth birthday, I had become more and more enraged and mystified by the idiot decisions made by my countrymen. And then I had come suddenly to pity them, for I understood how innocent and natural it was for them to behave so abominably, and with such abominable results: They were doing their best to live like people invented in story books. This was the reason Americans shot each other so often: It was a convenient literary device for ending short stories and books.
Why were so many Americans treated by their government as though their lives were as disposable as paper facial tissues? Because that was the way authors customarily treated bit-part players in their madeup tales.
And so on.
Once I understood what was making America such a dangerous, unhappy nation of people who had nothing to do with real life, I resolved to shun storytelling. I would write about life. Every person would be exactly as important as any other. All facts would also be given equal weightiness. Nothing would be left out. Let others bring order to chaos. I would bring chaos to order, instead, which I think I have done.
If all writers would do that, then perhaps citizens not in the literary trades will understand that there is no order in the world around us, that we must adapt ourselves to the requirements of chaos instead.
It is hard to adapt to chaos, but it can be done. I am living proof of that: It can be done.

„The most important thing I learned on Tralfamadore was that when a person dies he only appears to die.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch Slaughterhouse-Five

Billy writing a letter to a newspaper describing the Tralfamadorians
Slaughterhouse-Five (1969)
Kontext: The most important thing I learned on Tralfamadore was that when a person dies he only appears to die. He is still very much alive in the past, so it is very silly for people to cry at his funeral. All moments, past, present and future, always have existed, always will exist. The Tralfamadorians can look at all the different moments just that way we can look at a stretch of the Rocky Mountains, for instance. They can see how permanent all the moments are, and they can look at any moment that interests them. It is just an illusion we have here on Earth that one moment follows another one, like beads on a string, and that once a moment is gone it is gone forever.
When a Tralfamadorian sees a corpse, all he thinks is that the dead person is in bad condition in the particular moment, but that the same person is just fine in plenty of other moments. Now, when I myself hear that somebody is dead, I simply shrug and say what the Tralfamadorians say about dead people, which is "So it goes."

„You're the only ones zany enough to agonize over time and distance without limit, over mysteries that will never die, over the fact that we are right now determining whether the space voyage for the next billion years or so is going to be Heaven or Hell.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater

"Eliot Rosewater" to a group of science fiction writers
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater (1965)
Kontext: I love you sons of bitches. You’re all I read any more. You're the only ones who’ll talk all about the really terrific changes going on, the only ones crazy enough to know that life is a space voyage, and not a short one, either, but one that’ll last for billions of years. You’re the only ones with guts enough to really care about the future, who really notice what machines do to us, what wars do to us, what cities do to us, what big, simple ideas do to us, what tremendous misunderstanding, mistakes, accidents, catastrophes do to us. You're the only ones zany enough to agonize over time and distance without limit, over mysteries that will never die, over the fact that we are right now determining whether the space voyage for the next billion years or so is going to be Heaven or Hell.

„Democracy owed its life to know-how.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch Player Piano

Quelle: Player Piano (1952), Chapter 1 (p. 9)
Kontext: During the war, in hundreds of Iliums over America, managers and engineers learned to get along without their men and women, who went to fight. It was the miracle that won the war — production with almost no manpower. In the patois of the north side of the river, it was the know-how that won the war. Democracy owed its life to know-how.

„Bad guys turned informer. Good guys didn't — no matter when, no matter what.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch Player Piano

Quelle: Player Piano (1952), Chapter 31 (p. 293)
Kontext: Here it was again, the most ancient of roadforks, one that Paul had glimpsed before, in Kroner's study, months ago. The choice of one course or the other had nothing to do with machines, hierarchies, economics, love, age. It was a purely internal matter. Every child older than six knew the fork, and knew what the good guys did here, and what the bad guys did here. The fork was a familiar one in folk tales the world over, and the good guys and the bad guys, whether in chaps, breechclouts, serapes, leopardskins, or banker's gray pinstripes, all separated here.
Bad guys turned informer. Good guys didn't — no matter when, no matter what.

„Jokes can be noble. Laughs are exactly as honorable as tears. Laughter and tears are both responses to frustration and exhaustion, to the futility of thinking and striving anymore.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch Palm Sunday

"Palm Sunday", a sermon delivered at St. Clement's Church, New York City (ndg), originally published in The Nation as "Hypocrites You Always Have With You" (ndg)
Palm Sunday (1981)
Kontext: Jokes can be noble. Laughs are exactly as honorable as tears. Laughter and tears are both responses to frustration and exhaustion, to the futility of thinking and striving anymore. I myself prefer to laugh, since there is less cleaning up to do afterward — and since I can start thinking and striving again that much sooner.

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„Why were so many Americans treated by their government as though their lives were as disposable as paper facial tissues? Because that was the way authors customarily treated bit-part players in their madeup tales.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch Breakfast of Champions

Breakfast of Champions (1973)
Kontext: I thought Beatrice Keedsler had joined hands with other old-fashioned storytellers to make people believe that life had leading characters, minor characters, significant details, insignificant details, that it had lessons to be learned, tests to be passed, and a beginning, a middle, and an end.
As I approached my fiftieth birthday, I had become more and more enraged and mystified by the idiot decisions made by my countrymen. And then I had come suddenly to pity them, for I understood how innocent and natural it was for them to behave so abominably, and with such abominable results: They were doing their best to live like people invented in story books. This was the reason Americans shot each other so often: It was a convenient literary device for ending short stories and books.
Why were so many Americans treated by their government as though their lives were as disposable as paper facial tissues? Because that was the way authors customarily treated bit-part players in their madeup tales.
And so on.
Once I understood what was making America such a dangerous, unhappy nation of people who had nothing to do with real life, I resolved to shun storytelling. I would write about life. Every person would be exactly as important as any other. All facts would also be given equal weightiness. Nothing would be left out. Let others bring order to chaos. I would bring chaos to order, instead, which I think I have done.
If all writers would do that, then perhaps citizens not in the literary trades will understand that there is no order in the world around us, that we must adapt ourselves to the requirements of chaos instead.
It is hard to adapt to chaos, but it can be done. I am living proof of that: It can be done.

„I want to stay as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all kinds of things you can't see from the center.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch Player Piano

Quelle: Player Piano (1952), Chapter 9 (p. 86)
Kontext: "You think I'm insane?" said Finnerty. Apparently he wanted more of a reaction than Paul had given him.
"You're still in touch. I guess that's the test."
"Barely — barely."
"A psychiatrist could help. There's a good man in Albany."
Finnerty shook his head. "He'd pull me back into the center, and I want to stay as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all kinds of things you can't see from the center." He nodded, "Big, undreamed-of things — the people on the edge see them first."

„I haven’t heard one of them demand that the Sermon on the Mount, the Beatitudes, be posted anywhere.
"Blessed are the merciful" in a courtroom? "Blessed are the peacemakers" in the Pentagon? Give me a break!“

—  Kurt Vonnegut

Cold Turkey (2004)
Kontext: For some reason, the most vocal Christians among us never mention the Beatitudes. But, often with tears in their eyes, they demand that the Ten Commandments be posted in public buildings. And of course that’s Moses, not Jesus. I haven’t heard one of them demand that the Sermon on the Mount, the Beatitudes, be posted anywhere.
"Blessed are the merciful" in a courtroom? "Blessed are the peacemakers" in the Pentagon? Give me a break!

„Maybe God has let everybody who ever lived be reborn — so he or she can see how it ends.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, Happy Birthday, Wanda June

"Dr. Norbert Woodley"
Happy Birthday, Wanda June (1970)
Kontext: Maybe God has let everybody who ever lived be reborn — so he or she can see how it ends. Even Pitecanthropus erectus and Australopithecus and Sinanthropus pekensis and the Neanderthalers are back on Earth — to see how it ends. They're all on Times Square — making change for peepshows. Or recruiting Marines.

„How old is the Universe? It is one half-second old, but the half-second has lasted one quintillion years so far.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch Breakfast of Champions

Breakfast of Champions (1973)
Kontext: I was on par with the Creator of the Universe there in the dark in the cocktail lounge. I shrunk the Universe to a ball exactly one light-year in diameter. I had it explode. I had it disperse itself again.
Ask me a question, any question. How old is the Universe? It is one half-second old, but the half-second has lasted one quintillion years so far. Who created it? Nobody created it. It has always been here.
What is time? It is a serpent which eats its tail, like this:
This is the snake which uncoiled itself long enough to offer Eve the apple, which looked like this:
What was the apple which Eve and Adam ate? It was the Creator of the Universe.
And so on.
Symbols can be so beautiful, sometimes.

„So when my own time comes to join the choir invisible or whatever, God forbid, I hope someone will say, "He's up in Heaven now." Who really knows? I could have dreamed all this.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian

God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian (1999)
Kontext: I am honorary president of the American Humanist Association, having succeeded the late, great, spectacularly prolific writer and scientist, Dr. Isaac Asimov in that essentially functionless capacity. At an A. H. A. memorial service for my predecessor I said, "Isaac is up in Heaven now." That was the funniest thing I could have said to an audience of humanists. It rolled them in the aisles. Mirth! Several minutes had to pass before something resembling solemnity could be restored.
I made that joke, of course, before my first near-death experience — the accidental one.
So when my own time comes to join the choir invisible or whatever, God forbid, I hope someone will say, "He's up in Heaven now." Who really knows? I could have dreamed all this.
My epitaph in any case? "Everything was beautiful. Nothing hurt." I will have gotten off so light, whatever the heck it is that was going on.

„I'm going to have a hell of a good time in the process of buying one envelope.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut

Interview by David Brancaccio, NOW (PBS) (7 October 2005) http://www.pbs.org/now/arts/vonnegut.html
Various interviews
Kontext: [When Vonnegut tells his wife he's going out to buy an envelope] Oh, she says, well, you're not a poor man. You know, why don't you go online and buy a hundred envelopes and put them in the closet? And so I pretend not to hear her. And go out to get an envelope because I'm going to have a hell of a good time in the process of buying one envelope. I meet a lot of people. And, see some great looking babes. And a fire engine goes by. And I give them the thumbs up. And, and ask a woman what kind of dog that is. And, and I don't know. The moral of the story is, is we're here on Earth to fart around. And, of course, the computers will do us out of that. And, what the computer people don't realize, or they don't care, is we're dancing animals. You know, we love to move around. And, we're not supposed to dance at all anymore.

„I have to say this in defense of humankind: No matter in what era in history, including the Garden of Eden, everybody just got there.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut

Cold Turkey (2004)
Kontext: I have to say this in defense of humankind: No matter in what era in history, including the Garden of Eden, everybody just got there. And, except for the Garden of Eden, there were already all these crazy games going on, which could make you act crazy, even if you weren’t crazy to begin with. Some of the games that were already going on when you got here were love and hate, liberalism and conservatism, automobiles and credit cards, golf and girls’ basketball.
Even crazier than golf, though, is modern American politics, where, thanks to TV and for the convenience of TV, you can only be one of two kinds of human beings, either a liberal or a conservative.

„Give me knowledge or give me death!“

—  Kurt Vonnegut

As quoted in "An Interview with Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Carey Horwitz, Library Journal, Apr. 15, 1973: 1131
Various interviews
Kontext: All these people talk so eloquently about getting back to good old-fashioned values. Well, as an old poop I can remember back to when we had those old-fashioned values, and I say let's get back to the good old-fashioned First Amendment of the good old-fashioned Constitution of the United States—and to hell with the censors! Give me knowledge or give me death!

„What is time? It is a serpent which eats its tail“

—  Kurt Vonnegut, buch Breakfast of Champions

Breakfast of Champions (1973)
Kontext: I was on par with the Creator of the Universe there in the dark in the cocktail lounge. I shrunk the Universe to a ball exactly one light-year in diameter. I had it explode. I had it disperse itself again.
Ask me a question, any question. How old is the Universe? It is one half-second old, but the half-second has lasted one quintillion years so far. Who created it? Nobody created it. It has always been here.
What is time? It is a serpent which eats its tail, like this:
This is the snake which uncoiled itself long enough to offer Eve the apple, which looked like this:
What was the apple which Eve and Adam ate? It was the Creator of the Universe.
And so on.
Symbols can be so beautiful, sometimes.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Ähnliche Autoren

Jerome David Salinger Foto
Jerome David Salinger6
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller
Henry Louis Mencken Foto
Henry Louis Mencken14
US-amerikanischer Publizist und Schriftsteller
Charles Bukowski Foto
Charles Bukowski105
US-amerikanischer Dichter und Schriftsteller
Jack Kerouac Foto
Jack Kerouac27
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller und Beatnik
Richard Bach Foto
Richard Bach9
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller
Henry Miller Foto
Henry Miller11
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller und Maler
Truman Capote Foto
Truman Capote74
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller
Hunter S. Thompson Foto
Hunter S. Thompson19
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller und Reporter
Ray Bradbury Foto
Ray Bradbury14
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller
David Foster Wallace Foto
David Foster Wallace9
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller
Heutige Jubiläen
Christa Wolf Foto
Christa Wolf22
deutsche Schriftstellerin 1929 - 2011
Aleister Crowley Foto
Aleister Crowley7
britischer Okkultist, Schriftsteller und Bergsteiger 1875 - 1947
Christian Garve Foto
Christian Garve14
deutscher Philosoph 1742 - 1798
Woody Allen Foto
Woody Allen155
US-amerikanischer Komiker, Filmregisseur, Autor und Schausp… 1935
Weitere 48 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Jerome David Salinger Foto
Jerome David Salinger6
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller
Henry Louis Mencken Foto
Henry Louis Mencken14
US-amerikanischer Publizist und Schriftsteller
Charles Bukowski Foto
Charles Bukowski105
US-amerikanischer Dichter und Schriftsteller
Jack Kerouac Foto
Jack Kerouac27
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller und Beatnik
Richard Bach Foto
Richard Bach9
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller