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Henri Barbusse

Geburtstag: 17. Mai 1873
Todesdatum: 30. August 1935

Henri Barbusse war ein französischer Politiker und Schriftsteller.

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Das Feuer
Das Feuer
Henri Barbusse

Zitate Henri Barbusse

„Alles ruht in mir. Es gibt keine Richter, es gibt keine Schranken, und es gibt keine Grenzen vor mir.“

—  Henri Barbusse

"Die Hölle" (orig.: L`Enfer, 1908), Zürich 1919, ins Deutsche übersetzt von Max Hochdorf, S. 244

„Ist es möglich, daß ich nichts sei, wo es mich doch in manchen Augenblicken bedünkt, daß ich alles sei? Bin ich alles? Bin ich nichts?“

—  Henri Barbusse

"Die Hölle" (orig.: L`Enfer, 1908), Zürich 1919, ins Deutsche übersetzt von Max Hochdorf, S. 240

„Nach diesem Kriege darf es keinen Krieg mehr geben! […] - Keinen Krieg mehr, keinen Krieg mehr! - Ja, es ist genug!“

—  Henri Barbusse, buch Das Feuer

"Das Feuer" (orig.: Le Feu, 1916), Zürich 1920, ins Deutsche übersetzt von L. von Meyenburg, S. 390

„Zwei Armeen, die sich bekämpfen, sind eine grosse Armee, die Selbstmord an sich übt.“

—  Henri Barbusse, buch Das Feuer

"Das Feuer" (orig.: Le Feu, 1916), Zürich 1920, ins Deutsche übersetzt von L. von Meyenburg, S. 3
Original franz.: "Deux armées qui se battent, c'est comme une grande armée qui se suicide !" - Le feu - Journal d'une escouade. Chapitre 24: L'aube. books.google http://books.google.de/books?id=ZnpOg3DvCYQC&pg=PA291

„That society is badly arranged which forces nearly all women to be servants.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XXIII - Face To Face
Kontext: That society is badly arranged which forces nearly all women to be servants. Marie, who is as good as I am, will have spent her life in cleaning, in stooping amid dust and hot fumes, over head and ears in the great artificial darkness of the house. I used to find it all natural. Now I think it is all anti-natural.

„War will come again after this one. It will come again as long as it can be determined by people other than those who fight.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XVI - De Profundis Clamavi
Kontext: War will come again after this one. It will come again as long as it can be determined by people other than those who fight. The same causes will produce the same effects, and the living will have to give up all hope.

„I reflect that I am infinitely attached to this woman, that it is not true to say she is of less moment to me because desire no longer throws me on her as it used to do.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XXIII - Face To Face
Kontext: Against the window's still pallid sky I see her hair, silvered with a moonlike sheen, and her night-veiled face. Closely I look at the share of sublimity which she bears on it, and I reflect that I am infinitely attached to this woman, that it is not true to say she is of less moment to me because desire no longer throws me on her as it used to do. Is it habit? No, not only that. Everywhere habit exerts its gentle strength, perhaps between us two also. But there is more. There is not only the narrowness of rooms to bring us together. There is more, there is more! So I say to her:
"There's you."
"Me?" she says. "I'm nothing."
"Yes, you are everything, you're everything to me."

„There'll be a day when I shall begin something that I shan't finish — a walk, or a letter, or a sentence, or a dream.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XXIII - Face To Face
Kontext: When you look straight on, you end by seeing the immense event — death. There is only one thing which really gives the meaning of our whole life, and that is our death. In that terrible light may they judge their hearts who will one day die. Well I know that Marie's death would be the same thing in my heart as my own, and it seems to me also that only within her of all the world does my own likeness wholly live. We are not afraid of the too great sincerity which goes the length of these things; and we talk about them, beside the bed which awaits the inevitable hour when we shall not awake in it again. We say: —
"There'll be a day when I shall begin something that I shan't finish — a walk, or a letter, or a sentence, or a dream.".

„She was like a great rose that opens its heart to the whole world.“

—  Henri Barbusse

The Inferno (1917), Ch. XVI
Kontext: The woman from the depths of her rags, a waif, a martyr — smiled. She must have a divine heart to be so tired and yet smile. She loved the sky, the light, which the unformed little being would love some day. She loved the chilly dawn, the sultry noontime, the dreamy evening. The child would grow up, a saviour, to give life to everything again. Starting at the dark bottom he would ascend the ladder and begin life over again, life, the only paradise there is, the bouquet of nature. He would make beauty beautiful. He would make eternity over again with his voice and his song. And clasping the new-born infant close, she looked at all the sunlight she had given the world. Her arms quivered like wings. She dreamed in words of fondling. She fascinated all the passersby that looked at her. And the setting sun bathed her neck and head in a rosy reflection. She was like a great rose that opens its heart to the whole world.

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„What I have seen is going to disappear, since I shall do nothing with it.“

—  Henri Barbusse

The Inferno (1917), Ch. XVII
Kontext: What I have seen is going to disappear, since I shall do nothing with it. I am like a mother the fruit of whose womb will perish after it has been born.
What matter? I have heard the annunciation of whatever finer things are to come. Through me has passed, without staying me in my course, the Word which does not lie, and which, said over again, will satisfy.

„Commonplace life has shipwrecks worse than in Shakespearean dramas.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XIX - Ghosts
Kontext: She goes into her room and disappears. Before I went to the war we slept in the same bed. We used to lie down side by side, so as to be annihilated in unconsciousness, or to go and dream somewhere else. Commonplace life has shipwrecks worse than in Shakespearean dramas. For man and wife — to sleep, to die.) But since I came back we separate ourselves with a wall.

„Tradition reigns, the gospel of the blind adoration of what was and what is — God without a head.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XX The Cult
Kontext: Tradition reigns, the gospel of the blind adoration of what was and what is — God without a head. Man's destiny is eternally blockaded by two forms of tradition; in time, by hereditary succession; in space, by frontiers, and thus it is crushed and annihilated in detail. It is the truth. I am certain of it, for I am touching it.

„We do not die since we are alone. It is the others who die. And this sentence, which comes to my lips tremulously, at once baleful and beaming with light, announces that death is a false god.“

—  Henri Barbusse

The Inferno (1917), Ch. XIV
Kontext: Once, bowed in the evening light, the dead man had said, "After my death, life will continue. Every detail in the world will continue to occupy the same place quietly. All the traces of my passing will die little by little, and the void I leave behind will be filled once more."
He was mistaken in saying so. He carried all the truth with him. Yet we, we saw him die. He was dead for us, but not for himself. I feel there is a fearfully difficult truth here which we must get, a formidable contradiction. But I hold on to the two ends of it, groping to find out what formless language will translate it. Something like this: "Every human being is the whole truth." I return to what I heard. We do not die since we are alone. It is the others who die. And this sentence, which comes to my lips tremulously, at once baleful and beaming with light, announces that death is a false god.

„Ah, it seems that truth goes farther in all directions than one thought! We bend over the wrong that animals suffer, for them we wholly understand.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XIV - The Ruins
Kontext: The horse has not stopped bleeding. Its blood falls on me drop by drop with the regularity of a clock, — as though all the blood that is filtering through the strata of the field and all the punishment of the wounded came to a head in him and through him. Ah, it seems that truth goes farther in all directions than one thought! We bend over the wrong that animals suffer, for them we wholly understand.
Men, men! Everywhere the plain has a mangled outline. Below that horizon, sometimes blue-black and sometimes red-black, the plain is monumental!

„The emptied towns and the villages destroyed, they are a wilderness of our making. Yes, war is all of us, and all of us together.“

—  Henri Barbusse, buch Das Feuer

Under Fire (1916), Ch. 24 - The Dawn
Kontext: It's with us only that they make battles. It is we who are the material of war. War is made up of the flesh and the souls of common soldiers only. It is we who make the plains of dead and the rivers of blood, all of us, and each of us is invisible and silent because of the immensity of our numbers. The emptied towns and the villages destroyed, they are a wilderness of our making. Yes, war is all of us, and all of us together.

„I dimly see that there is something more than what we have seen, than what we have said, than what we have felt to-day. One day, perhaps, she and I will exchange better and richer sayings; and so, in that day, all the sadness will be of some service.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XIX - Ghosts
Kontext: Among some papers on my table I see the poem again which we once found out of doors, the bit of paper escaped from the mysterious hands which wrote on it, and come to the stone seat. It ended by whispering, "Only I know the tears that brimming rise, your beauty blended with your smile to espy."
In the days of yore it had made us smile with delight. To-night there are real tears in my eyes. What is it? I dimly see that there is something more than what we have seen, than what we have said, than what we have felt to-day. One day, perhaps, she and I will exchange better and richer sayings; and so, in that day, all the sadness will be of some service.

„It is not only a right; it is a virtue.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XVI - De Profundis Clamavi
Kontext: Men have gone towards each other because of that ray of light which each of them contains; and light resembles light. It reveals that the isolated man, too free in the open expanses, is doomed to adversity as if he were a captive, in spite of appearances; and that men must come together that they may be stronger, that they may be more peaceful, and even that they may be able to live.
For men are made to live their life in its depth, and also in all its length. Stronger than the elements and keener than all terrors are the hunger to last long, the passion to possess one's days to the very end and to make the best of them. It is not only a right; it is a virtue.

„The idea of motherland is not a false idea, but it is a little idea, and one which must remain little.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XX The Cult
Kontext: The idea of motherland is not a false idea, but it is a little idea, and one which must remain little.
There is only one common good. There is only one moral duty, only one truth, and every man is the shining recipient and guardian of it. The present understanding of the idea of motherland divides all these great ideas, cuts them into pieces, specializes them within impenetrable circles. We meet as many national truths as we do nations, and as many national duties, and as many national interests and rights — and they are antagonistic to each other.

„We're forgetting-machines. Men are things that think a little but chiefly forget. That's what we are.“

—  Henri Barbusse, buch Das Feuer

Under Fire (1916), Ch. 24 - The Dawn
Kontext: The paralysis of cold was passing away from the knot of sufferers, though the light no longer made any progress over the great irregular marsh of the lower plain. The desolation proceeded, but not the day.
Then he who spoke sorrowfully, like a bell, said. "It'll be no good telling about it, eh? They wouldn't believe you; not out of malice or through liking to pull your leg, but because they couldn't. When you say to 'em later, if you live to say it, 'We were on a night job and we got shelled and we were very nearly drowned in mud,' they'll say, 'Ah!' And p'raps they'll say. 'You didn't have a very spicy time on the job.' And that's all. No one can know it. Only us."
"No, not even us, not even us!" some one cried.
"That's what I say, too. We shall forget — we're forgetting already, my boy!"
"We've seen too much to remember."
"And everything we've seen was too much. We're not made to hold it all. It takes its damned hook in all directions. We're too little to hold it."
"You're right, we shall forget! Not only the length of the big misery, which can't be calculated, as you say, ever since the beginning, but the marches that turn up the ground and turn it again, lacerating your feet and wearing out your bones under a load that seems to grow bigger in the sky, the exhaustion until you don't know your own name any more, the tramping and the inaction that grind you, the digging jobs that exceed your strength, the endless vigils when you fight against sleep and watch for an enemy who is everywhere in the night, the pillows of dung and lice — we shall forget not only those, but even the foul wounds of shells and machine-guns, the mines, the gas, and the counter-attacks. At those moments you're full of the excitement of reality, and you've some satisfaction. But all that wears off and goes away, you don't know how and you don't know where, and there's only the names left, only the words of it, like in a dispatch."
"That's true what he says," remarks a man, without moving his head in its pillory of mud. When I was on leave, I found I'd already jolly well forgotten what had happened to me before. There were some letters from me that I read over again just as if they were a book I was opening. And yet in spite of that, I've forgotten also all the pain I've had in the war. We're forgetting-machines. Men are things that think a little but chiefly forget. That's what we are."
"Then neither the other side nor us'll remember! So much misery all wasted!"
This point of view added to the abasement of these beings on the shore of the flood, like news of a greater disaster, and humiliated them still more.
"Ah, if one did remember!" cried some one.
"If we remembered," said another, "there wouldn't be any more war."

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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