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Henri Barbusse

Geburtstag: 17. Mai 1873
Todesdatum: 30. August 1935

Henri Barbusse war ein französischer Politiker und Schriftsteller.

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Das Feuer
Das Feuer
Henri Barbusse

Zitate Henri Barbusse

„Nach diesem Kriege darf es keinen Krieg mehr geben! […] - Keinen Krieg mehr, keinen Krieg mehr! - Ja, es ist genug!“

—  Henri Barbusse, buch Das Feuer

"Das Feuer" (orig.: Le Feu, 1916), Zürich 1920, ins Deutsche übersetzt von L. von Meyenburg, S. 390

„Zwei Armeen, die sich bekämpfen, sind eine grosse Armee, die Selbstmord an sich übt.“

—  Henri Barbusse, buch Das Feuer

"Das Feuer" (orig.: Le Feu, 1916), Zürich 1920, ins Deutsche übersetzt von L. von Meyenburg, S. 3
Original franz.: "Deux armées qui se battent, c'est comme une grande armée qui se suicide !" - Le feu - Journal d'une escouade. Chapitre 24: L'aube. books.google http://books.google.de/books?id=ZnpOg3DvCYQC&pg=PA291

„Ist es möglich, daß ich nichts sei, wo es mich doch in manchen Augenblicken bedünkt, daß ich alles sei? Bin ich alles? Bin ich nichts?“

—  Henri Barbusse

"Die Hölle" (orig.: L`Enfer, 1908), Zürich 1919, ins Deutsche übersetzt von Max Hochdorf, S. 240

„Alles ruht in mir. Es gibt keine Richter, es gibt keine Schranken, und es gibt keine Grenzen vor mir.“

—  Henri Barbusse

"Die Hölle" (orig.: L`Enfer, 1908), Zürich 1919, ins Deutsche übersetzt von Max Hochdorf, S. 244

„I have heard the annunciation of whatever finer things are to come. Through me has passed, without staying me in my course, the Word which does not lie, and which, said over again, will satisfy.“

—  Henri Barbusse

The Inferno (1917), Ch. XVII
Kontext: What I have seen is going to disappear, since I shall do nothing with it. I am like a mother the fruit of whose womb will perish after it has been born.
What matter? I have heard the annunciation of whatever finer things are to come. Through me has passed, without staying me in my course, the Word which does not lie, and which, said over again, will satisfy.

„I dimly see that there is something more than what we have seen, than what we have said, than what we have felt to-day. One day, perhaps, she and I will exchange better and richer sayings; and so, in that day, all the sadness will be of some service.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XIX - Ghosts
Kontext: Among some papers on my table I see the poem again which we once found out of doors, the bit of paper escaped from the mysterious hands which wrote on it, and come to the stone seat. It ended by whispering, "Only I know the tears that brimming rise, your beauty blended with your smile to espy."
In the days of yore it had made us smile with delight. To-night there are real tears in my eyes. What is it? I dimly see that there is something more than what we have seen, than what we have said, than what we have felt to-day. One day, perhaps, she and I will exchange better and richer sayings; and so, in that day, all the sadness will be of some service.

„It is not only a right; it is a virtue.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XVI - De Profundis Clamavi
Kontext: Men have gone towards each other because of that ray of light which each of them contains; and light resembles light. It reveals that the isolated man, too free in the open expanses, is doomed to adversity as if he were a captive, in spite of appearances; and that men must come together that they may be stronger, that they may be more peaceful, and even that they may be able to live.
For men are made to live their life in its depth, and also in all its length. Stronger than the elements and keener than all terrors are the hunger to last long, the passion to possess one's days to the very end and to make the best of them. It is not only a right; it is a virtue.

„Against all the chains of facts I must have long arguments to bring; and the world's chaos requires an interpretation equally terrible.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XX The Cult
Kontext: My spirit is no longer what it was. Vaguely I seek, everywhere. I must see things with all their consequences, and right to their source. Against all the chains of facts I must have long arguments to bring; and the world's chaos requires an interpretation equally terrible.

„There are official proclamations, full of the notion of liberty and rights, which would be beautiful if they said truly what they say. But they who compose them do not attach their full meaning to the words. What they recite they are not capable of wanting, nor even of understanding.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XXII - Light
Kontext: There are official proclamations, full of the notion of liberty and rights, which would be beautiful if they said truly what they say. But they who compose them do not attach their full meaning to the words. What they recite they are not capable of wanting, nor even of understanding. The one indisputable sign of progress in ideas to-day is that there are things which they dare no longer leave publicly unsaid, and that's all. There are not all the political parties that there seem to be. They swarm, certainly, as numerous as the cases of short sight; but there are only two — the democrats and the conservatives. Every political deed ends fatally either in one or the other, and all their leaders have always a tendency to act in the direction of reaction.

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„I believe in a lofty form of poetry, in the work in which beauty will be mingled with beliefs.“

—  Henri Barbusse

The Inferno (1917), Ch. XVII
Kontext: Who shall compose the Bible of human desire, the terrible and simple Bible of that which drives us from life to life, the Bible of our doings, our goings, our original fall? Who will dare to tell everything, who will have the genius to see everything?
I believe in a lofty form of poetry, in the work in which beauty will be mingled with beliefs. The more incapable of it I feel myself, the more I believe it to be possible. The sad splendour with which certain memories of mine overwhelm me, shows me that it is possible. Sometimes I myself have been sublime, I myself have been a masterpiece. Sometimes my visions have been mingled with a thrill of evidence so strong and so creative that the whole room has quivered with it like a forest, and there have been moments, in truth, when the silence cried out.
But I have stolen all this, and I have profited by it, thanks to the shamelessness of the truth revealed. At the point in space in which, by accident, I found myself, I had only to open my eyes and to stretch out my mendicant hands to accomplish more than a dream, to accomplish almost a work.

„To understand life, and love it to its depths in a living being, that is the being's task, and that his masterpiece“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XXIII - Face To Face
Kontext: To understand life, and love it to its depths in a living being, that is the being's task, and that his masterpiece; and each of us can hardly occupy his time so greatly as with one other; we have only one true neighbor down here.

„The immense mourning of human hearts appears to us. We dare not name it yet; but we dare not let it not appear in all that we say.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XIX - Ghosts
Kontext: In those former times we lived. Now we hardly live any more, since we have lived. They who we were are dead, for we are here. Her glances come to me, but they do not join again the two surviving voids that we are; her look does not wipe out our widowhood, nor change anything. And I, I am too imbued with clear-sighted simplicity and truth to answer "no" when it is "yes." In this moment by my side Marie is like me.
The immense mourning of human hearts appears to us. We dare not name it yet; but we dare not let it not appear in all that we say.

„We are in a great night of the world.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XXII - Light
Kontext: We are in a great night of the world. The thing is to know if we shall wake up to-morrow. We have only one succor — we know of what the night is made. But shall we be able to impart our lucid faith, seeing that the heralds of warning are everywhere few, and that the greatest victims hate the only ideal which is not one, and call it utopian?

„There is nothing between the paradise dreamed of and the paradise lost. There is nothing, since we always want what we have not got. We hope, and then we regret.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XXIII - Face To Face
Kontext: There is nothing between the paradise dreamed of and the paradise lost. There is nothing, since we always want what we have not got. We hope, and then we regret. We hope for the future, and then we turn to the past, and then we begin slowly and desperately to hope for the past! The two most violent and abiding feelings, hope and regret, both lean upon nothing. To ask, to ask, to have not! Humanity is exactly the same thing as poverty. Happiness has not the time to live; we have not really the time to profit by what we are. Happiness, that thing which never is — and which yet, for one day, is no longer!

„One after another, sundry women have occupied my life.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. VII - A Summary
Kontext: One after another, sundry women have occupied my life. Antonia Veron was first. Her marriage and mine, their hindrance and restriction, threw us back upon each other as of yore. We found ourselves alone one day in my house — where nothing ever used to happen, and she offered me her lips, irresistibly. The appeal of her sensuality was answered by mine, then, and often later. But the pleasure constantly restored, which impelled me towards her, always ended in dismal enlightenments. She remained a capricious and baffling egotist, and when I came away from her house across the dark suburb among a host of beings vanishing, like myself, I only brought away the memory of her nervous and irritating laugh, and that new wrinkle which clung to her mouth like an implement.
Then younger desires destroyed the old, and gallant adventures begot one another. It is all over with this one and that one whom I adored. When I see them again, I wonder that I can say, at one and the same time, of a being who has not changed, "How I loved her!" and, "How I have ceased to love her!"

„All we can see is only a speck. You've got to remember that this morning there's three thousand kilometers of equal evils, or nearly equal, or worse.“

—  Henri Barbusse, buch Das Feuer

Under Fire (1916), Ch. 24 - The Dawn
Kontext: Paradis, possessed by his notion, waved his hand towards the wide unspeakable landscape. and looking steadily on it repeated his sentence, 'War is that. It is that everywhere. What are we, we chaps, and what's all this here? Nothing at all. All we can see is only a speck. You've got to remember that this morning there's three thousand kilometers of equal evils, or nearly equal, or worse."
"And then," said the comrade at our side, whom we could not recognize even by his voice, "to-morrow it begins again. It began again the day before yesterday, and all the days before that!"

„Yes, there is a Divinity, one from which we must never turn aside for the guidance of our huge inward life and of the share we have as well in the life of all men. It is called the truth.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XXIII - Face To Face
Kontext: Only the idolatrous and the weak have need of illusion as of a remedy. The rest only need see and speak.
She smiles, vague as an angel, hovering in the purity of the evening between light and darkness. I am so near to her that I must kneel to be nearer still. I kiss her wet face and soft lips, holding her hand in both of mine.
Yes, there is a Divinity, one from which we must never turn aside for the guidance of our huge inward life and of the share we have as well in the life of all men. It is called the truth.

„I was walking, but I seemed to be falling from dream to dream, from desire to desire. A door ajar, an open window gave me a pang. A woman passing by grazed against me, a woman who told me nothing of what she might have told me. I dreamed of her tragedy and of mine.“

—  Henri Barbusse

The Inferno (1917), Ch. XVI
Kontext: I went out on the street like an exile, I who am an everyday man, who resemble everybody else so much, too much. I went through the streets and crossed the squares with my eyes fixed upon things without seeing them. I was walking, but I seemed to be falling from dream to dream, from desire to desire. A door ajar, an open window gave me a pang. A woman passing by grazed against me, a woman who told me nothing of what she might have told me. I dreamed of her tragedy and of mine. She entered a house, she disappeared, she was dead.

„I would give my life for you, and I forgive you beforehand for everything you might ever do to make yourself happy.“

—  Henri Barbusse

Light (1919), Ch. XXIII - Face To Face
Kontext: You are a living creature, you are a human being, you are the infinity that man is, and all that you are unites me to you. Your suffering of just now, your regret for the ruins of youth and the ghosts of caresses, all of it unites me to you, for I feel them, I share them. Such as you are and such as I am. I can say to you at last, "I love you."
I love you, you who now appearing truly to me, you who truly duplicate my life. We have nothing to turn aside from us to be together. All your thoughts, all your likes, your ideas and your preferences have a place which I feel within me, and I see that they are right even if my own are not like them (for each one's freedom is part of his value), and I have a feeling that I am telling you a lie whenever I do not speak to you.
I am only going on with my thought when I say aloud:
"I would give my life for you, and I forgive you beforehand for everything you might ever do to make yourself happy.".

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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