Zitate von Luís de Camões

Luís de Camões Foto
0   0

Luís de Camões

Geburtstag: 1524
Todesdatum: 10. Juni 1580

Werbung

Luís Vaz de Camões [luˈiʃ vaʃ dɨ kaˈmõi̯ʃ] gilt als einer der bedeutendsten Dichter Portugals und der portugiesischen Sprache. Sein Epos Die Lusiaden ist ein maßgebendes Werk der Renaissance. Außerdem gehört Camões zu den herausragenden Lyrikern Europas. Als Dramatiker im Portugal der Renaissance und des 16. Jahrhunderts steht er neben Gil Vicente, António Ribeiro und António Ferreira.

Camões wird als Nationaldichter Portugals verehrt. Sein Todestag, der 10. Juni, ist portugiesischer Nationalfeiertag.

Ähnliche Autoren

Baruch Spinoza Foto
Baruch Spinoza28
niederländischer Philosoph des Rationalismus
Franz Grillparzer Foto
Franz Grillparzer44
österreichischer Dramatiker
Fernando Pessoa Foto
Fernando Pessoa23
portugiesischer Dichter und Schriftsteller
Julio Iglesias Foto
Julio Iglesias1
spanischer Sänger und Vater von Enrique Iglesias
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Foto
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe777
deutscher Dichter und Dramatiker
 Foto

Zitate Luís de Camões

„Time changes, and our desires change.“

—  Luís de Camões
Lyric poetry, Não pode tirar-me as esperanças, Mudam-se os tempos, mudam-se as vontades, Context: Time changes, and our desires change. What we believe—even what we are—is ever- changing. The world is change, which forever takes on new qualities. Selected Sonnets: A Bilingual Edition (2008), ed. William Baer, p. 70

„For, though in science much contained be,
In special cases practice more doth see.“

—  Luís de Camões
Epic poetry, Os Lusíadas (1572), Canto X, Context: Great Sir, let never the astonished Gall The English, German, and Italian, Have cause to say, the fainting Portugal Could not advance the great work he began. Let your advisers be experienced all, Such as have seen the world, and studied man. For, though in science much contained be, In special cases practice more doth see. Stanza 152 (tr. Richard Fanshawe); the poet advising King Sebastian of Portugal, then eighteen years of age.

Werbung

„The more I pay you, the more I owe.“

—  Luís de Camões
Lyric poetry, Não pode tirar-me as esperanças, Quem vê, Senhora, claro e manifesto, Context: Since it gives me so much bliss to give you everything I can The more I pay you, the more I owe. Quoted by Elizabeth Bishop in the dedication of Questions of Travel (1965) to Lota de Macedo Soares, her Brazilian lover.

„Better deserve them, and to go without;
Than have them undeserved“

—  Luís de Camões
Epic poetry, Os Lusíadas (1572), Canto IX, Context: For these vain honours, this false gold, give price (Unless he have it in himself) to none, Better deserve them, and to go without; Than have them undeserved, without doubt. Stanza 93, lines 5–8 (tr. Richard Fanshawe)

„I spoke, when rising through the darkened air,
Appalled, we saw a hideous phantom glare“

—  Luís de Camões
Epic poetry, Os Lusíadas (1572), Canto V, Context: I spoke, when rising through the darkened air, Appalled, we saw a hideous phantom glare; High and enormous over the flood he towered, And thwart our way with sullen aspect lowered. An earthy paleness over his cheeks was spread, Erect uprose his hairs of withered red; Writhing to speak, his sable lips disclose, Sharp and disjoined, his gnashing teeth's blue rows; His haggard beard flowed quivering on the wind, Revenge and horror in his mien combined; His clouded front, by withering lightnings scared, The inward anguish of his soul declared. His red eyes, glowing from their dusky caves, Shot livid fires: far echoing over the waves His voice resounded, as the caverned shore With hollow groan repeats the tempest's roar. Cold gliding horrors thrilled each hero's breast, Our bristling hair and tottering knees confessed Wild dread, the while with visage ghastly wan, His black lips trembling, thus the fiend began... Stanzas 39–40 (tr. William Julius Mickle); description of Adamastor, the "Spirit of the Cape".

„Go, gentle spirit! now supremely blest“

—  Luís de Camões
Lyric poetry, Não pode tirar-me as esperanças, Alma Minha Gentil, que te Partiste, Context: Go, gentle spirit! now supremely blest, From scenes of pain and struggling virtue go: From thy immortal seat of heavenly rest Behold us lingering in a world of woe! (anonymous translation) Meek spirit, who so early didst depart, Thou art at rest in Heaven! I linger here, And feed the lonely anguish of my heart; Thinking of all that made existence dear. (tr. Robert Southey) My gentle spirit! thou who hast departed So early, of this life in discontent, Rest thou there ever, in Heaven's firmament, While I live here on earth all broken-hearted. tr. John James Aubertin, in Seventy Sonnets of Camoens (1881), p. 17 Dear gentle soul, you that departed this life so soon and reluctantly, rest in heaven eternally while I remain here, broken-hearted. tr. Langed White, in The Collected Lyric Poems of Luis de Camoes (2016), p. 357

„O glory of commanding! O vain thirst
Of that same empty nothing we call fame!“

—  Luís de Camões
Epic poetry, Os Lusíadas (1572), Canto IV, Context: But an old man of venerable look (Standing upon the shore amongst the crowds) His eyes fixed upon us (on ship-board), shook His head three times, overcast with sorrow's clouds: And (straining his voice more, than well could brook His aged lungs: it rattled in our shrouds) Out of a science, practice did attest, Let fly these words from an oraculous breast:O glory of commanding! O vain thirst Of that same empty nothing we call fame! Stanzas 94–95 (tr. Richard Fanshawe); the Old Man of Restelo.

„The lover becomes the thing he loves“

—  Luís de Camões
Lyric poetry, Não pode tirar-me as esperanças, Transforma-se o amador na cousa amada, Context: The lover becomes the thing he loves By virtue of much imagining; Since what I long for is already in me, The act of longing should be enough.

„Love is a fire that burns unseen“

—  Luís de Camões, Rhythmas de Lvis de Camoes
Lyric poetry, Não pode tirar-me as esperanças, Amor é fogo que arde sem se ver, Context: Love is a fire that burns unseen, A wound that aches yet isn't felt, An always discontent contentment, A pain that rages without hurting,A longing for nothing but to long, A loneliness in the midst of people, A never feeling pleased when pleased, A passion that gains when lost in thought.It's being enslaved of your own free will; It's counting your defeat a victory; It's staying loyal to your killer.But if it's so self-contradictory, How can Love, when Love chooses, Bring human hearts into sympathy? Rimas, Sonnet 81 (as translated by Richard Zenith)<!-- http://portugal.poetryinternationalweb.org/piw_cms/cms/cms_module/index.php?obj_id=8436-->

„Whoever, Lady, sees plain and clear
the lovely essence of your fair eyes
and doesn't from seeing them go blind
hasn't paid your looks their due.“

—  Luís de Camões
Lyric poetry, Não pode tirar-me as esperanças, Quem vê, Senhora, claro e manifesto, Quem vê, Senhora, claro e manifesto o lindo ser de vossos olhos belos, se não perder a vista só em vê-los, já não paga o que deve a vosso gesto.

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„I speak it to our shame; the cause no grand
Poets adorn our country, is the small
Encouragement to such: for how can he
esteem, that understands not poetry?“

—  Luís de Camões
Epic poetry, Os Lusíadas (1572), Canto V, Sem vergonha o não digo, que a razão De algum não ser por versos excelente, É não se ver prezado o verso e rima, Porque quem não sabe arte, não na estima. Stanza 97, lines 5–8 (tr. Richard Fanshawe)

„That more would he serve, if life
Were not so short for love so long.“

—  Luís de Camões
Lyric poetry, Não pode tirar-me as esperanças, Sete anos de pastor Jacob servia, Mais servira, se não fora Para tão longo amor tão curta a vida. tr. Norwood Andrews

„To be a lion among sheep, 'tis poor.“

—  Luís de Camões
Epic poetry, Os Lusíadas (1572), Canto I, É fraqueza entre ovelhas ser leão. Stanza 68, line 8 (tr. Richard Fanshawe)

„That sad and joyful dawn,
light full of pity and grief,
while the world wakes in loneliness
I'll praise it and remember it.“

—  Luís de Camões
Lyric poetry, Não pode tirar-me as esperanças, Aquela triste e leda madrugada, Aquela triste e leda madrugada, Cheia toda de mágoa e de piedade, Enquanto houver no mundo saudade, Quero que seja sempre celebrada. tr. David Wevill

„For serving thee an arm to arms addressed;
for singing thee a soul the Muses raise.“

—  Luís de Camões
Epic poetry, Os Lusíadas (1572), Canto X, Pera servir-vos, braço às armas feito, Pera cantar-vos, mente às Musas dada. Stanza 155, line 1–2 (tr. Richard Francis Burton)

„No more the summer of my life remains,
My autumn's lengthening evenings chill my veins;
Down the black stream of years by woes on woes
Winged on, I hasten to the tomb's repose…“

—  Luís de Camões
Epic poetry, Os Lusíadas (1572), Canto X, Vão os anos decendo, e já do Estio Há pouco que passar até o Outono; A Fortuna me faz o engenho frio, Do qual já não me jacto nem me abono; Os desgostos me vão levando ao rio Do negro esquecimento e eterno sono... Stanza 9, lines 1–6 (tr. William Julius Mickle)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Die heutige Jubiläen
Virginia Woolf Foto
Virginia Woolf38
1882 - 1941
William Somerset Maugham Foto
William Somerset Maugham4
englischer Dramatiker und Schriftsteller 1874 - 1965
 Al Capone Foto
Al Capone1
US-amerikanischer Gangsterboss 1899 - 1947
Robert Burton Foto
Robert Burton5
englischer Schriftsteller und anglikanischer Geistlicher un… 1577 - 1640
Weitere 59 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Baruch Spinoza Foto
Baruch Spinoza28
niederländischer Philosoph des Rationalismus
Franz Grillparzer Foto
Franz Grillparzer44
österreichischer Dramatiker
Fernando Pessoa Foto
Fernando Pessoa23
portugiesischer Dichter und Schriftsteller
Julio Iglesias Foto
Julio Iglesias1
spanischer Sänger und Vater von Enrique Iglesias
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Foto
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe777
deutscher Dichter und Dramatiker