Zitate von David Lloyd George

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David Lloyd George

Geburtstag: 17. Januar 1863
Todesdatum: 26. März 1945

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David Lloyd George, 1. Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor OM war ein britischer Politiker. Er wurde während des Ersten Weltkrieges zum Premierminister gewählt und war der letzte Liberale, der dieses Amt innehatte.

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Zitate David Lloyd George

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„Ich weiss, was man zum Kriegführen braucht! Glauben Sie mir, Deutschland ist nicht dazu imstande“

—  David Lloyd George
1934, zum zwanzigsten Jahrestag des Kriegsausbruchs 1914. Zitiert bei Leopold Schwarzschild: Das Neue Tage-Buch, 1934 S. 749. Google Books

„The question will be asked, "Should 500 men, ordinary men, chosen accidentally from among the unemployed, override the judgment...of millions of people who are engaged in the industry which makes the wealth of the country?"“

—  David Lloyd George
Context: The question will be asked, "Should 500 men, ordinary men, chosen accidentally from among the unemployed, override the judgment... of millions of people who are engaged in the industry which makes the wealth of the country?" On the House of Lords, speech in Newcastle (9 October 1909), quoted in The Times (11 October 1909), p. 6

„I feel I can't go on with this bloody business: I would rather resign.“

—  David Lloyd George
Context: "I warn you", said Lloyd George, "that I am in a very pacifist temper". I listened last night, at a dinner given to Philip Gibbs on his return from the front, to the most impressive and moving description from him of what the war really means that I have heard. Even an audience of hardened politicians and journalists was strongly affected. The thing is horrible and beyond human nature to bear and "I feel I can't go on with this bloody business: I would rather resign." Quoted by C. P. Scott in his diary (28 December 1917), in Trevor Wilson (ed.), The Political Diaries of C. P. Scott, 1911-1928 (London: Collins, 1970), p. 324

„The Landlord is a gentleman … who does not earn his wealth.“

—  David Lloyd George
Context: Who is the landlord? The Landlord is a gentleman … who does not earn his wealth. He does not even take the trouble to receive his wealth. He has a host of agents and clerks that receive it for him. He does not even take the trouble to spend his wealth. He has a host of people around him to do the actual spending for him. He never sees it until he comes to enjoy it. His sole function, his chief pride is stately consumption of wealth produced by others. Speech in Limehouse, East London (30 July 1909), quoted in Better Times: Speeches by the Right Hon. D. Lloyd George, M.P., Chancellor of the Exchequer (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1910), pp. 150-151.

„This, Mr. Emmot, is a war Budget. It is for raising money to wage implacable warfare against poverty and squalidness.“

—  David Lloyd George
Context: This, Mr. Emmot, is a war Budget. It is for raising money to wage implacable warfare against poverty and squalidness. I cannot help hoping and believing that before this generation has passed away, we shall have advanced a great step towards that good time, when poverty, and the wretchedness and human degradation which always follows in its camp, will be as remote to the people of this country as the wolves which once infested its forests. Budget speech http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1909/apr/29/final-balance-sheet in the House of Commons (29 April 1909)

„Against enemy machine-gun posts and wire entanglements the most gallant and best-led men could only throw away their precious lives in successive waves of heroic martyrdom. Their costly sacrifice could avail nothing for the winning of victory.“

—  David Lloyd George
Context: Modern warfare, we discovered, was to a far greater extent than ever before a conflict of chemists and manufacturers. Manpower, it is true, was indispensable, and generalship will always, whatever the conditions, have a vital part to play. But troops, however brave and well led, were powerless under modern conditions unless equipped with adequate and up-to-date artillery (with masses of explosive shell), machine-guns, aircraft and other supplies. Against enemy machine-gun posts and wire entanglements the most gallant and best-led men could only throw away their precious lives in successive waves of heroic martyrdom. Their costly sacrifice could avail nothing for the winning of victory. War Memoirs (1938)

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„The fight must be to a finish—to a knock-out.“

—  David Lloyd George
Context: The British soldier is a good sportsman. He enlisted in this war in a sporting spirit—in the best sense of that term. He went in to see fair play to a small nation trampled upon by a bully. He is fighting for fair play. He has fought as a good sportsman. By the thousands he has died a good sportsman. He has never asked anything more than a sporting chance. He has not always had that. When he couldn't get it, he didn’t quit. He played the game. He didn’t squeal, and he has certainly never asked anyone to squeal for him. Under the circumstances the British, now that the fortunes of the game have turned a bit, are not disposed to stop because of the squealing done by Germans or done for Germans by probably well-meaning but misguided sympathizers and humanitarians... During these months when it seemed the finish of the British Army might come quickly, Germany elected to make this a fight to a finish with England. The British soldier was ridiculed and held in contempt. Now we intend to see that Germany has her way. The fight must be to a finish—to a knock-out. Interview with Roy Howard of the United Press of America (28 September 1916), quoted in The Times (29 September 1916), p. 7

„He won't fight the Germans but he will fight for Office.“

—  David Lloyd George
His opinion of Asquith's attempts to stay in power during the political crisis that ousted him from the premiership, quoted in Frances Stevenson's diary entry (5 December 1916), A. J. P. Taylor (ed.), Lloyd George: A Diary (London: Hutchinson, 1971), p. 133

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„A fully equipped Duke costs as much to keep up as two Dreadnoughts, and Dukes are just as great a terror, and they last longer.“

—  David Lloyd George
On the peers of the House of Lords, in a speech in Newcastle (9 October 1909), quoted in printed in the Manchester Guardian http://books.google.com/books?id=pDzmAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA1049 (11 October 1909)

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