Zitate von Arthur Stanley Eddington

Arthur Stanley Eddington Foto
3   0

Arthur Stanley Eddington

Geburtstag: 28. Dezember 1882
Todesdatum: 22. November 1944
Andere Namen: Sir Arthur Eddington, Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington

Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington war ein britischer Astrophysiker. Er war der Erste, dem die Modellierung des inneren Aufbaus von Sternen gelang. Weitere Schwerpunkte seiner Forschungen waren Dynamik der Sternbewegungen, astronomische Anwendungen der Relativitätstheorie und die Philosophie der Naturwissenschaften. Wikipedia

Zitate Arthur Stanley Eddington

„Bis zu den Sternen und darüber hinaus ist die Welt mit Äther erfüllt. Er durchdringt die Räume zwischen Atomen. Äther ist überall. […] Es gibt keinen Raum ohne Äther, und keinen Äther, der keinen Raum einnimmt.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Original engl.: "As far as and beyond the remotest stars the world is filled with aether. It permeates the interstices of the atoms. Aether is everywhere. ... There is no space without aether, and no aether which does not occupy space." - New pathways in science - Cambridge: University Press, 1935 (Messenger lectures 1934) S. 38-39

„Das Universum ist nicht nur seltsamer, als wir es uns vorstellen, es ist seltsamer, als wir es uns vorstellen können.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Zitiert von Robert B. Laughlin: Abschied von der Weltformel, Deutsch von Helmut Reuter, Widmungsblatt für Laughlings Frau Anita, S. 5, Piper Verlag, 2007, ISBN 978-3492047180
Original engl.: "Not only is the universe stranger than we imagine, it is stranger than we can imagine." - Als Motto in Robert B. Laughlin: A Different Universe - Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down. .
Wird auch sonst oft ohne Quellenangabe Eddington zugeordnet. Es könnte sich um eine Abwandlung einer Aussage von J. B. S. Haldane handeln, aus Possible worlds - New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Publishers, 2002. - ISBN 0-7658-0715-7 - Originalausgabe: Possible worlds and other essays, London : Chatto & Windus, 1927 - p. 286: "the Universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose."

„Die Mathematik ist nicht da, solange wir sie nicht da hinstellen.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Zitiert von Robert B. Laughlin: Abschied von der Weltformel, Deutsch von Helmut Reuter, 10. Kap. "Das Gewebe der Raumzeit", S. 179, Piper Verlag, 2007, ISBN 978-3492047180
Original engl.: "The mathematics is not there till we put it there." - The Philosophy of Physical Science : Tarner Lectures 1938 - New York: Macmillan, 1941. - p. 137 books.google http://books.google.de/books?id=XHE39fF8NMMC&pg=PA137&dq=till

„To understand the phenomena of the physical world it is necessary to know the equations which the symbols obey but not the nature of that which is being symbolised.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Science and the Unseen World (1929)
Kontext: If to-day you ask a physicist what he has finally made out the æther or the electron to be, the answer will not be a description in terms of billiard balls or fly-wheels or anything concrete; he will point instead to a number of symbols and a set of mathematical equations which they satisfy. What do the symbols stand for? The mysterious reply is given that physics is indifferent to that; it has no means of probing beneath the symbolism. To understand the phenomena of the physical world it is necessary to know the equations which the symbols obey but not the nature of that which is being symbolised.... this newer outlook has modified the challenge from the material to the spiritual world.<!--III, p.30

„…The present revolution of scientific thought follows in natural sequence on the great revolutions at earlier epochs in the history of science.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Einstein's special theory of relativity, which explains the indeterminateness of the frame of space and time, crowns the work of Copernicus who first led us to give up our insistence on a geocentric outlook on nature; Einstein's general theory of relativity, which reveals the curvature or non-Euclidean geometry of space and time, carries forward the rudimentary thought of those earlier astronomers who first contemplated the possibility that their existence lay on something which was not flat. These earlier revolutions are still a source of perplexity in childhood, which we soon outgrow; and a time will come when Einstein's amazing revelations have likewise sunk into the commonplaces of educated thought.
The Theory of Relativity and its Influence on Scientific Thought (1922), p. 31-32

„Never mind what two tons refers to. What is it?“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Quelle: The Nature of the Physical World (1928), Ch. 7 Pointer Readings <!-- p. 252 -->
Kontext: Never mind what two tons refers to. What is it? How has it entered in so definite a way into our exprerience? Two tons is the reading of the pointer when the elephant was placed on a weighing machine. Let us pass on. … And so we see that the poetry fades out of the problem, and by the time the serious application of exact science begins we are left only with pointer readings.

„However closely we may associate thought with the physical machinery of the brain, the connection is dropped as irrelevant as soon as we consider the fundamental property of thought—that it may be correct or incorrect. …that involves recognising a domain of the other type of law—laws which ought to be kept, but may be broken.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Science and the Unseen World (1929)
Kontext: However closely we may associate thought with the physical machinery of the brain, the connection is dropped as irrelevant as soon as we consider the fundamental property of thought—that it may be correct or incorrect.... that involves recognising a domain of the other type of law—laws which ought to be kept, but may be broken.<!--V, p.57-58

„If God is as real as the shadow of the Great War on Armistice Day, need we seek further reason for making a place for God in our thoughts and lives?“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Science and the Unseen World (1929)
Kontext: If God is as real as the shadow of the Great War on Armistice Day, need we seek further reason for making a place for God in our thoughts and lives? We shall not be concerned if the scientific explorer reports that he is perfectly satisfied that he has got to the bottom of things without having come across either.<!--VI, p.67

„We have found a strange foot-print on the shores of the unknown.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Space, Time and Gravitation (1920)
Kontext: We have found a strange foot-print on the shores of the unknown. We have devised profound theories, one after another, to account for its origins. At last, we have succeeded in reconstructing the creature that made the footprint. And lo! It is our own.<!--p.201

„Our story of evolution ended with a stirring in the brain-organ of the latest of Nature's experiments“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Science and the Unseen World (1929)
Kontext: Our story of evolution ended with a stirring in the brain-organ of the latest of Nature's experiments; but that stirring of consciousness transmutes the whole story and gives meaning to its symbolism. Symbolically it is the end, but looking behind the symbolism it is the beginning.<!--III, p.38

„If our so-called facts are changing shadows, they are shadows cast by the light of constant truth.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Science and the Unseen World (1929)
Kontext: If our so-called facts are changing shadows, they are shadows cast by the light of constant truth. So too in religion we are repelled by that confident theological doctrine... but we need not turn aside from the measure of light that comes into our experience showing us a Way through the unseen world.<!--IX, p.91

„The man in the street is always making this demand for concrete explanation of the things referred to in science; but of necessity he must be disappointed.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Introduction http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Extras/Eddington_Gifford.html
The Nature of the Physical World (1928)
Kontext: Science aims at constructing a world which shall be symbolic of the world of commonplace experience. It is not at all necessary that every individual symbol that is used should represent something in common experience or even something explicable in terms of common experience. The man in the street is always making this demand for concrete explanation of the things referred to in science; but of necessity he must be disappointed. It is like our experience in learning to read. That which is written in a book is symbolic of a story in real life. The whole intention of the book is that ultimately a reader will identify some symbol, say BREAD, with one of the conceptions of familiar life. But it is mischievous to attempt such identifications prematurely, before the letters are strung into words and the words into sentences. The symbol A is not the counterpart of anything in familiar life.

„It is to this background that our own personality and consciousness belong, and those spiritual aspects of our nature not to be described by any symbolism… to which mathematical physics has hitherto restricted itself.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Science and the Unseen World (1929)
Kontext: It remains a real world if there is a background to the symbols—an unknown quantity which the mathematical symbol x stands for. We think we are not wholly cut off from this background. It is to this background that our own personality and consciousness belong, and those spiritual aspects of our nature not to be described by any symbolism... to which mathematical physics has hitherto restricted itself.<!--III, p.37-38

„Wherever a way opens we are impelled to seek by the only methods that can be devised for that particular opening,“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Science and the Unseen World (1929)
Kontext: Physical science comes nearest to that complete system of exact knowledge which all sciences have before them as an ideal. Some fall far short of it. The physicist who inveighs against the lack of coherence and the indefiniteness of theological theories, will probably speak not much less harshly of the theories of biology and psychology. They also fail to come up to his standard of methodology. On the other side of him stands an even superior being—the pure mathematician—who has no high opinion of the methods of deduction used in physics, and does not hide his disapproval of the laxity of what is accepted as proof in physical science. And yet somehow knowledge grows in all these branches. Wherever a way opens we are impelled to seek by the only methods that can be devised for that particular opening, not over-rating the security of our finding, but conscious that in this activity of mind we are obeying the light that is in our nature.<!--VII, p.77-78

„The theory of the "expanding universe" might also be called the theory of the "shrinking atom".“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

The Expanding Universe (1933)
Kontext: All change is relative. The universe is expanding relatively to our common material standards; our material standards are shrinking relatively to the size of the universe. The theory of the "expanding universe" might also be called the theory of the "shrinking atom". <...>

„For the truth of the conclusions of physical science, observation is the supreme Court of Appeal.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

The Philosophy of Physical Science (1938)
Kontext: For the truth of the conclusions of physical science, observation is the supreme Court of Appeal. It does not follow that every item which we confidently accept as physical knowledge has actually been certified by the Court; our confidence is that it would be certified by the Court if it were submitted. But it does follow that every item of physical knowledge is of a form which might be submitted to the Court. It must be such that we can specify (although it may be impracticable to carry out) an observational procedure which would decide whether it is true or not. Clearly a statement cannot be tested by observation unless it is an assertion about the results of observation. Every item of physical knowledge must therefore be an assertion of what has been or would be the result of carrying out a specified observational procedure. <!-- p. 9

„The casting of the net corresponds to observation; for knowledge which has not been or could not be obtained by observation is not admitted into physical science.
An onlooker may object that the first generalisation is wrong. "There are plenty of sea-creatures under two inches long, only your net is not adapted to catch them." The icthyologist dismisses this objection contemptuously.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

The Philosophy of Physical Science (1938)
Kontext: Let us suppose that an ichthyologist is exploring the life of the ocean. He casts a net into the water and brings up a fishy assortment. Surveying his catch, he proceeds in the usual manner of a scientist to systematise what it reveals. He arrives at two generalisations: No sea-creature is less than two inches long. (2) All sea-creatures have gills. These are both true of his catch, and he assumes tentatively that they will remain true however often he repeats it.
In applying this analogy, the catch stands for the body of knowledge which constitutes physical science, and the net for the sensory and intellectual equipment which we use in obtaining it. The casting of the net corresponds to observation; for knowledge which has not been or could not be obtained by observation is not admitted into physical science.
An onlooker may object that the first generalisation is wrong. "There are plenty of sea-creatures under two inches long, only your net is not adapted to catch them." The icthyologist dismisses this objection contemptuously. "Anything uncatchable by my net is ipso facto outside the scope of icthyological knowledge. In short, what my net can't catch isn't fish." Or — to translate the analogy — "If you are not simply guessing, you are claiming a knowledge of the physical universe discovered in some other way than by the methods of physical science, and admittedly unverifiable by such methods. You are a metaphysician. Bah!"

„In the world of physics we watch a shadowgraph performance of the drama of familiar life.“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington

Introduction
The Nature of the Physical World (1928)
Kontext: In physics we have outgrown archer and apple-pie definitions of the fundamental symbols. To a request to explain what an electron really is supposed to be we can only answer, "It is part of the A B C of physics".
The external world of physics has thus become a world of shadows. In removing our illusions we have removed the substance, for indeed we have seen that substance is one of the greatest of our illusions. Later perhaps we may inquire whether in our zeal to cut out all that is unreal we may not have used the knife too ruthlessly. Perhaps, indeed, reality is a child which cannot survive without its nurse illusion. But if so, that is of little concern to the scientist, who has good and sufficient reasons for pursuing his investigations in the world of shadows and is content to leave to the philosopher the determination of its exact status in regard to reality. In the world of physics we watch a shadowgraph performance of the drama of familiar life. The shadow of my elbow rests on the shadow table as the shadow ink flows over the shadow paper. It is all symbolic, and as a symbol the physicist leaves it. Then comes the alchemist Mind who transmutes the symbols. The sparsely spread nuclei of electric force become a tangible solid; their restless agitation becomes the warmth of summer; the octave of aethereal vibrations becomes a gorgeous rainbow. Nor does the alchemy stop here. In the transmuted world new significances arise which are scarcely to be traced in the world of symbols; so that it becomes a world of beauty and purpose — and, alas, suffering and evil.
The frank realisation that physical science is concerned with a world of shadows is one of the most significant of recent advances.

Ähnliche Autoren

Carl Sagan Foto
Carl Sagan10
US-amerikanischer Naturwissenschaftler und Fernsehmoderator
Stephen Hawking Foto
Stephen Hawking95
britischer theoretischer Physiker
Doris Lessing Foto
Doris Lessing4
britische Schriftstellerin
William Golding Foto
William Golding2
britischer Schriftsteller
Douglas Adams Foto
Douglas Adams66
britischer Schriftsteller
Zygmunt Bauman Foto
Zygmunt Bauman70
britisch-polnischer Soziologe und Philosoph
Richard Branson Foto
Richard Branson16
britischer Unternehmer und Ballonfahrer
Freddie Mercury Foto
Freddie Mercury72
britischer Rocksänger
Anthony Hopkins Foto
Anthony Hopkins1
britisch-amerikanischer Schauspieler
Elton John Foto
Elton John71
britischer Musiker
Heutige Jubiläen
Richard Bach Foto
Richard Bach9
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller 1936
Alan Turing Foto
Alan Turing5
britischer Logiker, Mathematiker und Kryptoanalytiker 1912 - 1954
Markus Zusak Foto
Markus Zusak13
deutsch-australischer Schriftsteller 1975
Rafik Schami Foto
Rafik Schami10
syrisch-deutscher Schriftsteller und promovierter Chemiker 1946
Weitere 50 heutige Jubiläen
Ähnliche Autoren
Carl Sagan Foto
Carl Sagan10
US-amerikanischer Naturwissenschaftler und Fernsehmoderator
Stephen Hawking Foto
Stephen Hawking95
britischer theoretischer Physiker
Doris Lessing Foto
Doris Lessing4
britische Schriftstellerin
William Golding Foto
William Golding2
britischer Schriftsteller
Douglas Adams Foto
Douglas Adams66
britischer Schriftsteller