„I know you'll do what's best for Annabeth."
"How can you be sure?"
"Because she'd do the same for you.“

—  Rick Riordan, buch Percy Jackson – Der Fluch des Titanen

Quelle: The Titan's Curse

Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Rick Riordan Foto
Rick Riordan5
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller 1964

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„Do you know because I tell you so, or do you know, do you know.“

—  Gertrude Stein American art collector and experimental writer of novels, poetry and plays 1874 - 1946

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—  Eleanor Roosevelt American politician, diplomat, and activist, and First Lady of the United States 1884 - 1962

As quoted in How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1944; 1948) by Dale Carnegie; though Roosevelt has sometimes been credited with the originating the expression, "Damned if you do and damned if you don't" is set in quote marks, indicating she herself was quoting a common expression in saying this. Actually, this saying was coined back even earlier, 1836, by evangelist Lorenzo Dow in his sermons about ministers saying the Bible contradicts itself, telling his listeners, "… those who preach it up, to make the Bible clash and contradict itself, by preaching somewhat like this: 'You can and you can't-You shall and you shan't-You will and you won't-And you will be damned if you do-And you will be damned if you don't.' "

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—  Eleanor Roosevelt American politician, diplomat, and activist, and First Lady of the United States 1884 - 1962

As quoted in How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1944; 1948) by Dale Carnegie; though Roosevelt has sometimes been credited with the originating the expression, "Damned if you do and damned if you don't" is set in quote marks, indicating she herself was quoting a common expression in saying this. Actually, this saying was coined back even earlier, 1836, by evangelist Lorenzo Dow in his sermons about ministers saying the Bible contradicts itself, telling his listeners, "… those who preach it up, to make the Bible clash and contradict itself, by preaching somewhat like this: 'You can and you can't-You shall and you shan't-You will and you won't-And you will be damned if you do-And you will be damned if you don't.' "

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