„I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself“

Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
David Herbert Lawrence Foto
David Herbert Lawrence6
englischer Schriftsteller 1885 - 1930

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D.H. Lawrence Foto

„I never saw a wild thing
Sorry for itself.
A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough
without ever having felt sorry for itself.“

—  D.H. Lawrence English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter 1885 - 1930

Self-Pity (1929)
Quelle: The Complete Poems

Bob Dylan Foto

„So many things that we never will undo
I know you're sorry, I'm sorry too.“

—  Bob Dylan American singer-songwriter, musician, author, and artist 1941

Song lyrics, Love and Theft (2001), Mississippi

F. Scott Fitzgerald Foto

„Dishonesty in a woman is a thing you never blame deeply - I was casually sorry, and then I forgot.“

—  F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Quelle: Quoted, The Great Gatsby (1925), ch. 3

Bob Dylan Foto

„I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it.“

—  Bob Dylan American singer-songwriter, musician, author, and artist 1941

Song lyrics, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (1963), A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall

F. Scott Fitzgerald Foto

„So we'll just let things take their course, and never be sorry.“

—  F. Scott Fitzgerald, buch Benediction

Quelle: Benediction

Herman Melville Foto
Vincent Gallo Foto
David Foster Wallace Foto

„If Realism called it like it saw it, Metafiction simply called it as it saw itself seeing itself see it.“

—  David Foster Wallace American fiction writer and essayist 1962 - 2008

E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction
Essays
Quelle: A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again: Essays and Arguments
Kontext: The emergence of something called Metafiction in the American '60s was hailed by academic critics as a radical aesthetic, a whole new literary form, literature unshackled from the cultural cinctures of mimetic narrative and free to plunge into reflexivity and self-conscious meditations on aboutness. Radical it may have been, but thinking that postmodern Metafiction evolved unconscious of prior changes in readerly taste is about as innocent as thinking that all those college students we saw on television protesting the Vietnam war were protesting only because they hated the Vietnam war (They may have hated the war, but they also wanted to be seen protesting on television. TV was where they'd seen the war, after all. Why wouldn't they go about hating it on the very medium that made their hate possible?) Metafictionists may have had aesthetic theories out the bazoo, but they were also sentient citizens of a community that was exchanging an old idea of itself as a nation of do-ers and be-ers for a new vision of the U. S. A. as an atomized mass of self-conscious watchers and appearers. For Metafiction, in its ascendant and most important phases, was really nothing more than a single-order expansion of its own theoritcal nemesis, Realism: if Realism called it like it saw it, Metafiction simply called it as it saw itself seeing it. This high-cultural postmodern genre, in other words, was deeply informed by the emergence of television and the metastasis of self-conscious watching.

Benoît Mandelbrot Foto

„Here is the curious thing: the first night I saw the set, it was just wild. The second night, I became used to it. After a few nights, I became familiar with it. It was as if somehow I had seen it before. Of course I hadn't. No one had seen it.“

—  Benoît Mandelbrot Polish-born, French and American mathematician 1924 - 2010

New Scientist interview (2004)
Kontext: There is nothing more to this than a simple iterative formula. It is so simple that most children can program their home computers to produce the Mandelbrot set. … Its astounding complication was completely out of proportion with what I was expecting. Here is the curious thing: the first night I saw the set, it was just wild. The second night, I became used to it. After a few nights, I became familiar with it. It was as if somehow I had seen it before. Of course I hadn't. No one had seen it. No one had described it. The fact that a certain aspect of its mathematical nature remains mysterious, despite hundreds of brilliant people working on it, is the icing on the cake to me.

„I wanted my wild things to be frightening.“

—  Maurice Sendak American illustrator and writer of children's books 1928 - 2012

As quoted in The Art of Maurice Sendak by Selma G. Lanes (1980)
Kontext: I wanted my wild things to be frightening. But why? It was probably at this point that I remembered how I detested my Brooklyn relatives as a small child. They came almost every Sunday, and there was my week-long anxiety about their coming the next Sunday... They'd lean way over with their bad teeth and hairy noses, and say something threatening like "You're so cute I could eat you up." And I knew if my mother didn't hurry up with the cooking, they probably would.

Yohji Yamamoto Foto
Mary Gaitskill Foto
Margaret Mitchell Foto

„She saw in his eyes defeat of her wild dreams, her mad desires.“

—  Margaret Mitchell, buch Vom Winde verweht (1937 German edition)

Quelle: Gone with the Wind

Joseph Conrad Foto
Federico Fellini Foto

„A created thing is never invented and it is never true: it is always and ever itself.“

—  Federico Fellini Italian filmmaker 1920 - 1993

"Creation"
I'm a Born Liar (2003)

Julian of Norwich Foto

„I saw that two contrary things should never be together in one place. The most contrary that are, is the highest bliss and the deepest pain.“

—  Julian of Norwich English theologian and anchoress 1342 - 1416

The Sixteenth Revelation, Chapter 72
Kontext: I saw that two contrary things should never be together in one place. The most contrary that are, is the highest bliss and the deepest pain. The highest bliss that is, is to have Him in clarity of endless life, Him verily seeing, Him sweetly feeling, all-perfectly having in fulness of joy. And thus was the Blissful Cheer of our Lord shewed in Pity: in which Shewing I saw that sin is most contrary, — so far forth that as long as we be meddling with any part of sin, we shall never see clearly the Blissful Cheer of our Lord. And the more horrible and grievous that our sins be, the deeper are we for that time from this blissful sight. And therefore it seemeth to us oftentimes as we were in peril of death, in a part of hell, for the sorrow and pain that the sin is to us. And thus we are dead for the time from the very sight of our blissful life. But in all this I saw soothfastly that we be not dead in the sight of God, nor He passeth never from us. But He shall never have His full bliss in us till we have our full bliss in Him, verily seeing His fair Blissful Cheer. For we are ordained thereto in nature, and get thereto by grace. Thus I saw how sin is deadly for a short time in the blessed creatures of endless life.

Agatha Christie Foto
Philip K. Dick Foto

„I saw Substance D growing. I saw death rising from the earth, from the ground itself, in one blue field, in stubbled color.“

—  Philip K. Dick, buch A Scanner Darkly

Quelle: A Scanner Darkly (1977), Chapter 17 (p. 275)

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