„The saint is the man who acts as if he had died and returned to life; having already ceased to be "himself" in the earthly sense, he has no intention whatever of returning to that dream, but maintains himself in a kind of wakefulness, which the world with its narrowness and impurities cannot understand.“

[2006, Gnosis: Divine Wisdom, World Wisdom, 116-117, 978-1-933316-18-5]
Spiritual path, Holiness

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Bearbeitet von Monnystr. Letzte Aktualisierung 17. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Frithjof Schuon Foto
Frithjof Schuon1
Schweizer Orientalist und Religionsphilosoph 1907 - 1998

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Otto Weininger Foto
Cormac McCarthy Foto

„It is not so much the kind of person a man is as the kind of situation in which he finds himself that determines how he will act.“

—  Stanley Milgram Social psychologist 1933 - 1984

Quelle: Obedience to Authority : An Experimental View (1974), p. 205
Kontext: The social psychology of this century reveals a major lesson: often it is not so much the kind of person a man is as the kind of situation in which he finds himself that determines how he will act.

François-René de Chateaubriand Foto
Jacques-Yves Cousteau Foto

„When one man, for whatever reason, has the opportunity to lead an extraordinary life, he has no right to keep it to himself“

—  Jacques-Yves Cousteau French naval officer, explorer, conservationist, filmmaker, innovator, scientist, photographer, author and researcher 1910 - 1997

C. Northcote Parkinson Foto

„The man whose life is devoted to paperwork has lost the initiative, He is dealing with things that are brought to his notice, having ceased to notice anything for himself.“

—  C. Northcote Parkinson British naval historian 1909 - 1993

Cited in:Lionel G. Titman (1990), The Effective Office: A Handbook of Modern Office Management. p. 117
In-laws and Outlaws, (1962)

Michel De Montaigne Foto

„A man of understanding has lost nothing, if he has himself.“

—  Michel De Montaigne, buch Essays

L'homme d'entendement n'a rien perdu, s'il a soi-même.
Book I, Ch. 39
Essais (1595), Book I

Watchman Nee Foto
Amit Chaudhuri Foto
Richard Rodríguez Foto
Theodore Roosevelt Foto

„The man who calls himself an American citizen and who yet shows by his actions that he is primarily the citizen of a foreign land, plays a thoroughly mischievous part in the life of our body politic. He has no place here; and the sooner he returns to the land to which he feels his real heart allegiance, the better it will be for every good American. There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.“

—  Theodore Roosevelt American politician, 26th president of the United States 1858 - 1919

1910s, Address to the Knights of Columbus (1915)
Kontext: The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic. The men who do not become Americans and nothing else are hyphenated Americans; and there ought to be no room for them in this country. The man who calls himself an American citizen and who yet shows by his actions that he is primarily the citizen of a foreign land, plays a thoroughly mischievous part in the life of our body politic. He has no place here; and the sooner he returns to the land to which he feels his real heart allegiance, the better it will be for every good American. There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

William Golding Foto
Edmund Burke Foto
Colin Wilson Foto
Henry Adams Foto

„Strange as it sounds, although Man thought himself hardly treated in respect to freedom, yet, if freedom meant superiority, Man was in action much the superior of God, whose freedom suffered, from Saint Thomas, under restraints that Man never would have tolerated. Saint Thomas did not allow God even an undetermined will; he was pure Act, and as such he could not change. Man alone was, in act, allowed to change direction. What was more curious still, Man might absolutely prove his freedom by refusing to move at all; if he did not like his life, he could stop it, and habitually did so, or acquiesced in its being done for him; while God could not commit suicide or even cease for a single instant his continuous action. If Man had the singular fancy of making himself absurd,— a taste confined to himself but attested by evidence exceedingly strong,— he could be as absurd as he liked; but God could not be absurd. Saint Thomas did not allow the Deity the right to contradict himself, which is one of Man's chief pleasures. While Man enjoyed what was, for his purposes, an unlimited freedom to be wicked,— a privilege which, as both Church and State bitterlly complained and still complain, he has outrageously abused,— God was Goodness and could be nothing else. […] In one respect, at least, Man's freedom seemed to be not relative but absolute, for his thought was an energy paying no regard to space or time or order or object or sense; but God's thought was his act and will at once; speaking correctly, God could not think, he is. Saint Thomas would not, or could not, admit that God was Necessity, as Abélard seems to have held, but he refused to tolerate the idea of a divine maniac, free from moral obligation to himself. The atmosphere of Saint Louis surrounds the God of Saint Thomas, and its pure ether shuts out the corruption and pollution to come,— the Valois and Bourbons, the Occams and Hobbes's, the Tudors and the Medicis of an enlightened Europe.“

—  Henry Adams journalist, historian, academic, novelist 1838 - 1918

Mont Saint Michel and Chartres (1904)

G. I. Gurdjieff Foto
Augustus De Morgan Foto
Stanisław Lem Foto
Giacomo Casanova Foto
Peter Ackroyd Foto

„He had the satisfied countenance of a man who has never succeeded in boring himself.“

—  Peter Ackroyd, buch The Last Testament of Oscar Wilde

Page 45.
The Last Testament of Oscar Wilde (1983)

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