„The ancients considered mechanics in a twofold respect; as rational, which proceeds accurately by demonstration, and practical. To practical mechanics all the manual arts belong, from which mechanics took its name. But as artificers do not work with perfect accuracy, it comes to pass that mechanics is so distinguished from geometry, that what is perfectly accurate is called geometrical; what is less so is called mechanical. But the errors are not in the art, but in the artificers. He that works with less accuracy is an imperfect mechanic: and if any could work with perfect accuracy, he would be the most perfect mechanic of all; for the description of right lines and circles, upon which geometry is founded, belongs to mechanics. Geometry does not teach us to draw these lines, but requires them to be drawn; for it requires that the learner should first be taught to describe these accurately, before he enters upon geometry; then it shows how by these operations problems may be solved.“

—  Isaac Newton, buch Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica

Preface (8 May 1686)
Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687)

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Isaac Newton Foto
Isaac Newton53
englischer Naturforscher und Verwaltungsbeamter 1643 - 1727

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Isaac Newton Foto

„The ancients considered mechanics in a twofold respect; as rational, which proceeds accurately by demonstration, and practical. To practical mechanics all the manual arts belong, from which mechanics took its name.“

—  Isaac Newton, buch Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica

Preface (8 May 1686)
Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687)
Kontext: The ancients considered mechanics in a twofold respect; as rational, which proceeds accurately by demonstration, and practical. To practical mechanics all the manual arts belong, from which mechanics took its name. But as artificers do not work with perfect accuracy, it comes to pass that mechanics is so distinguished from geometry, that what is perfectly accurate is called geometrical; what is less so is called mechanical. But the errors are not in the art, but in the artificers. He that works with less accuracy is an imperfect mechanic: and if any could work with perfect accuracy, he would be the most perfect mechanic of all; for the description of right lines and circles, upon which geometry is founded, belongs to mechanics. Geometry does not teach us to draw these lines, but requires them to be drawn; for it requires that the learner should first be taught to describe these accurately, before he enters upon geometry; then it shows how by these operations problems may be solved.

Isaac Newton Foto

„Geometry does not teach us to draw these lines, but requires them to be drawn; for it requires that the learner should first be taught to describe these accurately, before he enters upon geometry; then it shows how by these operations problems may be solved.“

—  Isaac Newton, buch Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica

Preface (8 May 1686)
Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687)
Kontext: The ancients considered mechanics in a twofold respect; as rational, which proceeds accurately by demonstration, and practical. To practical mechanics all the manual arts belong, from which mechanics took its name. But as artificers do not work with perfect accuracy, it comes to pass that mechanics is so distinguished from geometry, that what is perfectly accurate is called geometrical; what is less so is called mechanical. But the errors are not in the art, but in the artificers. He that works with less accuracy is an imperfect mechanic: and if any could work with perfect accuracy, he would be the most perfect mechanic of all; for the description of right lines and circles, upon which geometry is founded, belongs to mechanics. Geometry does not teach us to draw these lines, but requires them to be drawn; for it requires that the learner should first be taught to describe these accurately, before he enters upon geometry; then it shows how by these operations problems may be solved.

Isaac Newton Foto
Carl Friedrich Gauss Foto
Confucius Foto

„The expectations of life depend upon diligence the mechanic that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools.“

—  Confucius Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher -551 - -479 v.Chr

Quelle: The Analects of Confucius:

David Eugene Smith Foto
Immanuel Kant Foto

„Newton… (after having remarked that geometry only requires two of the mechanical actions which it postulates, namely, to describe a straight line and a circle) says: geometry is proud of being able to achieve so much while taking so little from extraneous sources. One might say of metaphysics, on the other hand: it stands astonished, that with so much offered it by pure mathematics it can effect so little.“

—  Immanuel Kant, buch Metaphysische Anfangsgründe der Naturwissenschaft

In the meantime, this little is something which mathematics indispensably requires in its application to natural science, which, inasmuch as it must here necessarily borrow from metaphysics, need not be ashamed to allow itself to be seen in company with the latter.
Preface, Tr. Bax (1883) citing Isaac Newton's Principia
Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science (1786)

William Paley Foto
Immanuel Kant Foto
Joseph Louis Lagrange Foto
Peter Higgs Foto

„Higgs mechanism should be renamed the “ABEGHHK'tH mechanism”“

—  Peter Higgs British physicist 1929

During the opening of one conference Peter Higgs attended to. The name is after all of the people (Philip Warren Anderson, Robert Brout, François Englert, Gerry Guralnik, Dick Hagen, Peter Higgs, Tom Kibble and Gerard 't Hooft) who discovered it, or rediscovered it.

Archimedes Foto
Charles Dupin Foto
Henry Gantt Foto
Eduard Jan Dijksterhuis Foto

„Mechanics… was an axiomatic construction; and… its problem could be solved quantitatively by algebraic methods.“

—  Eduard Jan Dijksterhuis Dutch historian 1892 - 1965

Robert Jacobus Forbes and E. J. Dijksterhuis (1963) A History of Science and Technology, vol. I: Ancient Times to the Seventeenth Century, Baltimore.

F. J. Duarte Foto

„The most efficient and practical interpretation of quantum mechanics is… no interpretation at all.“

—  F. J. Duarte Chilean-American physicist 1954

in [Quantum Optics for Engineers, CRC, New York, 2013, 978-1439888537, F. J. Duarte]

Victor J. Stenger Foto

„The so-called mysteries of quantum mechanics are in its philosophical interpretation, not in its mathematics.“

—  Victor J. Stenger American philosopher 1935 - 2014

In God and the Folly of Faith: The Incompatibility of Science and Religion (2012)

Marshall McLuhan Foto
Walter Scott Foto

„A lawyer without history or literature is a mechanic, a mere working mason; if he possesses some knowledge of these, he may venture to call himself an architect.“

—  Walter Scott Scottish historical novelist, playwright, and poet 1771 - 1832

Sir Walter Scott Collection Guy Mannering. Chap. xxxvii.
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

William Cowper Foto

„Made poetry a mere mechanic art.“

—  William Cowper (1731–1800) English poet and hymnodist 1731 - 1800

Quelle: Table Talk (1782), Line 654.

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