„Another evil, and one of the worst which arises from the separation of theoretical and practical knowledge, is the fact that a large number of persons“

"On the Harmony of Theory and Practice in Mechanics" (Jan. 3, 1856)
Kontext: Another evil, and one of the worst which arises from the separation of theoretical and practical knowledge, is the fact that a large number of persons, possessed of an inventive turn of mind and of considerable skill in the manual operations of practical mechanics, are destitute of that knowledge of scientific principles which is requisite to prevent their being misled by their own ingenuity. Such men too often spend their money, waste their lives, and it may be lose their reason in the vain pursuits of visionary inventions, of which a moderate amount of theoretical knowledge would be sufficient to demonstrate the fallacy; and for want of such knowledge, many a man who might have been a useful and happy member of society, becomes a being than whom it would be hard to find anything more miserable.
The number of those unhappy persons — to judge from the patent-lists, and from some of the mechanical journals — must be much greater than is generally believed.<!--p. 176

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William John Macquorn Rankine
schottisch-britischer Physiker und Ingenieur 1820 - 1872

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„For what democracy needs most of all is a party that will separate the good that is in it theoretically from the evils that beset it practically, and then try to erect that good into a workable system. What it needs beyond everything is a party of liberty.“

—  H.L. Mencken American journalist and writer 1880 - 1956

1920s, Notes on Democracy (1926)
Kontext: For what democracy needs most of all is a party that will separate the good that is in it theoretically from the evils that beset it practically, and then try to erect that good into a workable system. What it needs beyond everything is a party of liberty. It produces, true enough, occasional libertarians, just as despotism produces occasional regicides, but it treats them in the same drum-head way. It will never have a party of them until it invents and installs a genuine aristocracy, to breed them and secure them.

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The Living Law, 10 Illinois Law Review 461, 467 (1915-16).
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All we know of science or of religion comes from philosophy. It lies behind and above all other knowledge we have or use.
My Philosophy (1965) http://www.foundingchurchdc.org/dc/ref/philo/index.htm.

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