„It is desirable that the practical views entertained by sanitary reformers should be kept widely distinct from any such theories, the character of which has been well drawn by Malthus“

Quelle: Sanitary Economy (1850), p. 28-29
Kontext: It has been among the visions of some dreaming philosophers that human life is capable of almost indefinite extension. The great Condorcet was one of these. He thought that by the removal of the two causes of evil—poverty and superfluity—by destroying prejudices and superstitions, and by various other operations, which he considered the purification of mankind, but which other people would call their pollution, the approach of death would by degrees be farther and farther indefinitely protracted. It is desirable that the practical views entertained by sanitary reformers should be kept widely distinct from any such theories, the character of which has been well drawn by Malthus when he says—"... Though I may not be able in the present instance to mark the limit at which further improvement will stop I can very easily mention a point at which it will not arrive."

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Robert Chambers (publisher, born 1802) Foto
Robert Chambers (publisher, born 1802)100
Scottish publisher and writer 1802 - 1871

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George Peacock Foto
William Cobbett Foto
Rudolf Clausius Foto
G. K. Chesterton Foto

„In the matter of reforming things, as distinct from deforming them, there is one plain and simple principle; a principle which will probably be called a paradox.“

—  G. K. Chesterton English mystery novelist and Christian apologist 1874 - 1936

Quelle: The Thing (1929), Ch. IV : The Drift From Domesticity
Kontext: In the matter of reforming things, as distinct from deforming them, there is one plain and simple principle; a principle which will probably be called a paradox. There exists in such a case a certain institution or law; let us say, for the sake of simplicity, a fence or gate erected across a road. The more modern type of reformer goes gaily up to it and says, "I don't see the use of this; let us clear it away." To which the more intelligent type of reformer will do well to answer: "If you don't see the use of it, I certainly won't let you clear it away. Go away and think. Then, when you can come back and tell me that you do see the use of it, I may allow you to destroy it."
This paradox rests on the most elementary common sense. The gate or fence did not grow there. It was not set up by somnambulists who built it in their sleep. It is highly improbable that it was put there by escaped lunatics who were for some reason loose in the street. Some person had some reason for thinking it would be a good thing for somebody. And until we know what the reason was, we really cannot judge whether the reason was reasonable. It is extremely probable that we have overlooked some whole aspect of the question, if something set up by human beings like ourselves seems to be entirely meaningless and mysterious. There are reformers who get over this difficulty by assuming that all their fathers were fools; but if that be so, we can only say that folly appears to be a hereditary disease. But the truth is that nobody has any business to destroy a social institution until he has really seen it as an historical institution. If he knows how it arose, and what purposes it was supposed to serve, he may really be able to say that they were bad purposes, or that they have since become bad purposes, or that they are purposes which are no longer served. But if he simply stares at the thing as a senseless monstrosity that has somehow sprung up in his path, it is he and not the traditionalist who is suffering from an illusion.

Carl Linnaeus Foto

„I have been not been able to discover any character by which man can be distinguished from the ape“

—  Carl Linnaeus Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist 1707 - 1778

Fauna Suecica (1746) as quoted by Jeffrey H. Schwartz, Sudden Origins: Fossils, Genes, and the Emergence of Species (1999)
Kontext: As a natural historian according to the principles of science, up to the present time I have been not been able to discover any character by which man can be distinguished from the ape; for there are somewhere apes which are less hairy than man, erect in position, going just like him on two feet, and recalling the human species by the use they make of their hands and feet, to such an extent, that the less educated travellers have given them out as a kind of man.

Augustus De Morgan Foto
Charles Darwin Foto

„It may be doubted whether any character can be named which is distinctive of a race and is constant.“

—  Charles Darwin, buch The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex

volume I, chapter VII: "On the Races of Man", page 225 http://darwin-online.org.uk/content/frameset?pageseq=238&itemID=F937.1&viewtype=image
The Descent of Man (1871)

Jesse Ventura Foto
Kurt Vonnegut Foto

„Everything of mine which has been filmed so far has been one character short, and that character is me.“

—  Kurt Vonnegut American writer 1922 - 2007

"Preface"
Between Time and Timbuktu (1972)
Kontext: I have become an enthusiast for the printed word again. I have to be that, I now understand, because I want to be a character in all of my works. I can do that in print. In a movie, somehow, the author always vanishes. Everything of mine which has been filmed so far has been one character short, and that character is me.

Terry Eagleton Foto

„Any attempt to define literary theory in terms of a distinctive method is doomed to failure.“

—  Terry Eagleton British writer, academic and educator 1943

Conclusion: political Criticism, p. 172
1980s, Literary Theory: An Introduction (1983)

Benjamin Boretz Foto
Marshall McLuhan Foto

„It's misleading to suppose there's any basic difference between education & entertainment. This distinction merely relieves people of the responsibility of looking into the matter.“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communicatio… 1911 - 1980

(1957) from "Classroom Without Walls", Explorations Vol. 7, 1957; reprinted in Explorations in Communication ed. E. Carpenter & M. McLuhan, (Boston: Beacon, 1960); and again in McLuhan: Hot and Cool ed. G. E. Stearn (NY: Dial, 1967).
1960s, Hot & Cool (1967)

Alasdair MacIntyre Foto
Mark Rothko Foto

„I will say without reservations that from my point of view there can be no abstractions. Any shape or area that has not the pulsating concreteness of real flesh and bones, its vulnerability to pleasure or pain is nothing at all. Any picture that does not provide the environment in which the breath of life can be drawn does not interest me.“

—  Mark Rothko American painter 1903 - 1970

letter to Clyfford Still, undated; as quoted in Mark Rothko : A Biography (1993), James E. B. Breslin / and Abstract Expressionism, Creators and Critics, ed. Clifford Ross, Abrams Publishers New York 1990, p. 170
after 1970, posthumous

Terry Pratchett Foto

„While a book has got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the reader it's got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the writer as well.“

—  Terry Pratchett English author 1948 - 2015

alt.fan.pratchett (1 December 1998) http://www.lspace.org/fandom/afp/timelines/discussions/is-pterry-going-downhill.html
Usenet

Ho Chi Minh Foto
Paulo Freire Foto

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