„Yet in time of stress and public agitation we have too great a tendency to disregard this policy and indulge in race hatred, religious intolerance, and disregard of equal rights. Such sentiments are bound to react upon those who harbor them. Instead of being a benefit they are a positive injury.“

1920s, Ways to Peace (1926)
Kontext: Yet in time of stress and public agitation we have too great a tendency to disregard this policy and indulge in race hatred, religious intolerance, and disregard of equal rights. Such sentiments are bound to react upon those who harbor them. Instead of being a benefit they are a positive injury. We do not have to examine history very far before we see whole countries that have been blighted, whole civilizations that have been shattered by a spirit of intolerance. They are destructive of order and progress at home and a danger to peace and good will abroad. No better example exists of toleration than that which is exhibited by those who wore the blue toward those who wore the gray. Our condition today is not merely that of one people under one flag, but of a thoroughly united people who have seen bitterness and enmity which once threatened to sever them pass away, and a spirit of kindness and good will reign over them all.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Calvin Coolidge Foto
Calvin Coolidge1
US-amerikanischer Politiker, 30. Präsident der USA 1872 - 1933

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Learned Hand Foto

„Yet to assimilate agitation, legitimate as such, with direct incitement to violent resistance, is to disregard the tolerance of all methods of political agitation which in normal times is a safeguard of free government.“

—  Learned Hand American legal scholar, Court of Appeals judge 1872 - 1961

Masses Publishing Co. v. Patten (1917).
Judicial opinions
Kontext: Political agitation, by the passions it arouses or the convictions it engenders, may in fact stimulate men to the violation of the law. Detestation of existing policies is easily transformed into forcible resistance of the authority which puts them in execution, and it would be folly to disregard the causal relation between the two. Yet to assimilate agitation, legitimate as such, with direct incitement to violent resistance, is to disregard the tolerance of all methods of political agitation which in normal times is a safeguard of free government.

Karen Armstrong Foto
Thomas Jackson Foto

„Disregard public opinion when it interferes with your duty.“

—  Thomas Jackson Confederate general 1824 - 1863

Misattributed, Jackson's personal book of maxims

John Marshall Harlan Foto

„If evils will result from the commingling of the two races upon public highways established for the benefit of all, they will be infinitely less than those that will surely come from state legislation regulating the enjoyment of civil rights upon the basis of race.“

—  John Marshall Harlan United States Union Army officer and Supreme Court Associate Justice 1833 - 1911

We boast of the freedom enjoyed by our people above all other peoples. But it is difficult to reconcile that boast with a state of the law which, practically, puts the brand of servitude and degradation upon a large class of our fellow-citizens, our equals before the law. The thin disguise of "equal" accommodations for passengers in railroad coaches will not mislead anyone, nor atone for the wrong this day done.
1890s, Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)

François Duvalier Foto

„I accept the people's will. As a revolutionary, I have no right to disregard the will of the people.“

—  François Duvalier 40th President of the Republic of Haiti 1907 - 1971

Quoted in Elizabeth Abbott, Haiti: An insider's history of the rise and fall of the Duvaliers (1988), p. 103.

John F. Kennedy Foto

„He dared you with Olympian majesty and … tossed out his formulations with a merciless disregard for sentiment…“

—  Girilal Jain Indian journalist 1924 - 1993

M.J. Akbar, This tongue had bones, 1993. Quoted from Elst, Koenraad (2001). Decolonizing the Hindu mind: Ideological development of Hindu revivalism. New Delhi: Rupa. p.218

E.M. Forster Foto
Larry Page Foto

„Have a healthy disregard for the impossible.“

—  Larry Page American computer scientist and Internet entrepreneur 1973

Larry Page's Google Zeitgeist 2012 talk https://singularityhub.com/2012/05/27/larry-page-with-a-healthy-disregard-for-the-impossible-people-can-do-almost-anything/

William Kingdon Clifford Foto

„However plain and obvious these reasons may be, so that no man of ordinary intelligence, reflecting upon the matter, could fail to arrive at them, it is nevertheless true that a great many persons do habitually disregard them in weighing testimony.“

—  William Kingdon Clifford English mathematician and philosopher 1845 - 1879

The Ethics of Belief (1877), The Weight Of Authority
Kontext: In what cases, then, let us ask in the first place, is the testimony of a man unworthy of belief? He may say that which is untrue either knowingly or unknowingly. In the first case he is lying, and his moral character is to blame; in the second case he is ignorant or mistaken, and it is only his knowledge or his judgment which is in fault. In order that we may have the right to accept his testimony as ground for believing what he says, we must have reasonable grounds for trusting his veracity, that he is really trying to speak the truth so far as he knows it; his knowledge, that he has had opportunities of knowing the truth about this matter; and his judgment, that he has made proper use of those opportunities in coming to the conclusion which he affirms.
However plain and obvious these reasons may be, so that no man of ordinary intelligence, reflecting upon the matter, could fail to arrive at them, it is nevertheless true that a great many persons do habitually disregard them in weighing testimony. Of the two questions, equally important to the trustworthiness of a witness, "Is he dishonest?" and "May he be mistaken?" the majority of mankind are perfectly satisfied if one can, with some show of probability, be answered in the negative. The excellent moral character of a man is alleged as ground for accepting his statements about things which he cannot possibly have known.

Grover Cleveland Foto
Charles Evans Hughes Foto

„Equally unavailing is the insistence that the statute is designed to prevent the circulation of scandal which tends [p722] to disturb the public peace and to provoke assaults and the commission of crime. Charges of reprehensible conduct, and in particular of official malfeasance, unquestionably create a public scandal, but the theory of the constitutional guaranty is that even a more serious public evil would be caused by authority to prevent publication. To prohibit the intent to excite those unfavorable sentiments against those who administer the Government is equivalent to a prohibition of the actual excitement of them, and to prohibit the actual excitement of them is equivalent to a prohibition of discussions having that tendency and effect, which, again, is equivalent to a protection of those who administer the Government, if they should at any time deserve the contempt or hatred of the people, against being exposed to it by free animadversions on their characters and conduct. There is nothing new in the fact that charges of reprehensible conduct may create resentment and the disposition to resort to violent means of redress, but this well understood tendency did not alter the determination to protect the press against censorship and restraint upon publication. […] The danger of violent reactions becomes greater with effective organization of defiant groups resenting exposure, and if this consideration warranted legislative interference with the initial freedom of publication, the constitutional protection would be reduced to a mere form of words.“

—  Charles Evans Hughes American judge 1862 - 1948

Near v. Minnesota, 283 U.S. 697 (1931).
Judicial opinions

Ulysses S. Grant Foto

„In some places colored laborers were compelled to vote according to the wishes of their employers, under threats of discharge if they acted otherwise; and there are too many instances in which, when these threats were disregarded, they were remorselessly executed by those who made them.“

—  Ulysses S. Grant 18th President of the United States 1822 - 1885

I understand that the fifteenth amendment to the Constitution was made to prevent this and a like state of things, and the act of May 31, 1870, with amendments, was passed to enforce its provisions, the object of both being to guarantee to all citizens the right to vote and to protect them in the free enjoyment of that right.
1870s, Sixth State of the Union Address (1874)

Geert Wilders Foto

„The analysis is clear, we have a great problem with Islam, in the Netherlands too. The solution is not so complicated; what is missing are political guts and a feeling of urgency. Immigration from Islamic countries should be forbidden. We must learn to be intolerant with the intolerant, in the street, in the mosque, in court. We must answer hatred and violence by terrorists with exclusion and intolerance and show who the boss in the Netherlands is.“

—  Geert Wilders Dutch politician 1963

Den Haag laf tegen islamitisch extremisme http://www.nrc.nl/nieuws/2005/07/22/den-haag-laf-tegen-islamitisch-extremisme-10580808-a530504, NRC Handelsblad (22 July 2005). Quoted in Tradition and Future of Islamic Education (2009) by Wilna A. J. Meijer, p. 24.
2000s
Original: (nl) De analyse is helder, we hebben een groot probleem met de islam, ook in Nederland. De oplossing is ook niet zo gecompliceerd; wat ontbreekt is politieke lef en gevoel van urgentie. Immigratie uit islamitische landen moet worden verboden. We moeten leren intolerant te zijn tegen de intoleranten, op straat, in de moskee en in de rechtbank. We moeten haat en geweld van terroristen beantwoorden met uitsluiting en intolerantie en laten zien wie de baas is in Nederland.

Alfred Denning, Baron Denning Foto
Fritz Leiber Foto

„A scientist ought to have a healthy disregard for coincidences.“

—  Fritz Leiber, buch Conjure Wife

Quelle: Conjure Wife (1953), Chapter 3 (p. 39).

James D. Watson Foto

„The tendency is to focus on the worst-case scenario and to shy away from potentially controversial science; it is time, I think, we looked instead at the benefits.“

—  James D. Watson American molecular biologist, geneticist, and zoologist. 1928

Quelle: DNA: The Story of the Genetic Revolution (2003/2017), Chapter 13, “Who We Are: Nature vs. Nurture” (p. 372)

Theodore Roosevelt Foto

„Our public life depends primarily not upon the men who occupy public positions for the moment, because they are but an infinitesimal fraction of the whole. Our public life depends upon men who take an active interest in that public life; who are bound to see public affairs honestly and competently managed; but who have the good sense to know what honesty and competency actually mean.“

—  Theodore Roosevelt American politician, 26th president of the United States 1858 - 1919

1900s, Address at the Prize Day Exercises at Groton School (1904)
Kontext: You often hear people speaking as if life was like striving upward toward a mountain peak. That is not so. Life is as if you were traveling a ridge crest. You have the gulf of inefficiency on one side and the gulf of wickedness on the other, and it helps not to have avoided one gulf if you fall into the other. It shall profit us nothing if our people are decent and ineffective. It shall profit us nothing if they are efficient and wicked. In every walk of life, in business, politics; if the need comes, in war; in literature, science, art, in everything, what we need is a sufficient number of men who can work well and who will work with a high ideal. The work can be done in a thousand different ways. Our public life depends primarily not upon the men who occupy public positions for the moment, because they are but an infinitesimal fraction of the whole. Our public life depends upon men who take an active interest in that public life; who are bound to see public affairs honestly and competently managed; but who have the good sense to know what honesty and competency actually mean. And any such man, if he is both sane and high-minded, can be a greater help and strength to any one in public life than you can easily imagine without having had yourselves the experience. It is an immense strength to a public man to know a certain number of people to whom he can appeal for advice and for backing; whose character is so high that baseness would shrink ashamed before them; and who have such good sense that any decent public servant is entirely willing to lay before them every detail of his actions, asking only that they know the facts before they pass final judgment.

Walter Bagehot Foto
Robert M. La Follette Sr. Foto

„Publicity, discussion, and agitation are necessary to accomplish any work of lasting benefit.“

—  Robert M. La Follette Sr. American politician 1855 - 1925

Spoken in Evansville, IN (July 7, 1906), As quoted in Unreasonable Men: Theodore Roosevelt and the Republican Rebels Who Created Progressive Politics, Michael Wolraich (2014)

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