„He paints for the blind, and we are the blind, and he lets us see for sure what we saw long ago but weren't sure we saw.“

—  William Saroyan, I Used to Believe I Had Forever — Now I'm Not So Sure (1968), Context: He paints for the blind, and we are the blind, and he lets us see for sure what we saw long ago but weren't sure we saw. He paints for the dead, to remind us that — great good God, think of it — we're alive, and on our way to weather, from the sea to the hot interior, to watermelon there, a bird at night chasing a child past flowering cactus, a building on fire, barking dogs, and guitar-players not playing at eight o'clock, every picture saying, "Did you live, man? Were you alive back there for a little while? Good for you, good for you, and wasn't it hot, though? Wasn't it great when it was hot, though?" On painter Rufino Tamayo.
William Saroyan Foto
William Saroyan2
US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller 1908 - 1981
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„We look at the mountain to see the painting, then we look at the painting to see the mountain.“

—  Mark Tobey American abstract expressionist painter 1890 - 1976
1950's, In: Reminiscence and Reverie, 1951, p. 231

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„He [ Manet ] begged me to go straight up and see his painting [ 'Le Balcon'] - Berthe was model for this painting], as he was rooted to the spot. I've never seen anyone in such a state, one minute he was laughing, the next insisting his picture was dreadful; in the next breath, sure it would be a huge success.“

—  Berthe Morisot painter from France 1841 - 1895
1860 - 1870, quote from Berthe Morisot to her sister Edma Morisot, after visiting the Salon of Paris in 1869; as cited in The Correspondence of Berthe Morisot, with her family and friends, Denish Rouart with Adler and Garb; Camden Press London 1984, pp. 33-34

Thomas Fuller (writer) Foto

„1597. For whom does the blind Man's Wife paint her self?“

—  Thomas Fuller (writer) British physician, preacher, and intellectual 1654 - 1734
Introductio ad prudentiam: Part II (1727), Gnomologia (1732), Compare Poor Richard's Almanack (1736) : Why does the blind man's wife paint herself?

Claude Monet Foto
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„The artist should not only paint what he sees before him, but also what he sees in himself. If, however, he sees nothing within him, then he should also refrain from painting what he sees before him.“

—  Caspar David Friedrich Swedish painter 1774 - 1840
undated, Context: The artist should not only paint what he sees before him, but also what he sees in himself. If, however, he sees nothing within him, then he should also refrain from painting what he sees before him. Otherwise his pictures will be like those folding screens behind which one expects to find only the sick or the dead. Quote from "The Awe-Struck Witness" in TIME magazine (28 October 1974) http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,908926-1,00.html and in "On the Brink: The Artist and the Seas" by Eldon N. Van Liere in Poetics of the Elements in the Human Condition: The Sea (1985) ed. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka Variant translations: The artist should not only paint what he sees before him, but also what he sees within him. If, however, he sees nothing within him, then he should also omit to paint that which he sees before him. As quoted in German Romantic Painting (1994) by William Vaughan, p. 68

„When we read what Goethe says about men we are ashamed of what we have said; when we read what he says about painting and statues we are ashamed of what Goethe has said.“

—  Randall Jarrell poet, critic, novelist, essayist 1914 - 1965
A Sad Heart at the Supermarket: Essays & Fables (1962), “Malraux and the Statues at Bamberg”, p. 194

„You can't make a perfect painting. We can see perfection in our minds. But we can't make a perfect painting.“

—  Agnes Martin American artist 1912 - 2004
1980 - 2000, interview with Joan Simon, 1995 in Perfection is in the Mind, p. 86; as quoted in A House Divided: American Art Since 1955, Anne M. G. Wagner, Univ. of California Press, 2012, p. 263

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„The painter should not paint what he sees, but what will be seen.“

—  Paul Valéry French poet, essayist, and philosopher 1871 - 1945
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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“