„Nothing is so beautiful as Spring—
When weeds, in wheels, shoot long and lovely and lush“

—  Gerard Manley Hopkins, Context: Nothing is so beautiful as Spring— When weeds, in wheels, shoot long and lovely and lush; Thrush’s eggs look little low heavens, and thrush Through the echoing timber does so rinse and wring The ear, it strikes like lightning to hear him sing. " Spring http://www.bartleby.com/122/9.html", stanza 1
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Gerard Manley Hopkins
britischer Lyriker und Jesuit 1844 - 1889
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