„If men of eminence are exposed to censure on one hand, they are as much liable to flattery on the other. If they receive reproaches which are not due to them, they likewise receive praises which they do not deserve.“

No. 101 (26 June 1711), this has sometimes been quoted as "It is the privilege of posterity to set matters right between those antagonists who, by their rivalry for greatness, divided a whole age".
The Spectator (1711–1714)
Kontext: If men of eminence are exposed to censure on one hand, they are as much liable to flattery on the other. If they receive reproaches which are not due to them, they likewise receive praises which they do not deserve. In a word, the man in a high post is never regarded with an indifferent eye, but always considered as a friend or an enemy. For this reason persons in great stations have seldom their true characters drawn till several years after their deaths. Their personal friendships and enmities must cease, and the parties they were engaged in be at an end, before their faults or their virtues can have justice done them. When writers have the least opportunity of knowing the truth, they are in the best disposition to tell it.
It is therefore the privilege of posterity to adjust the characters of illustrious persons, and to set matters right between those antagonists who by their rivalry for greatness divided a whole age into factions.

Letzte Aktualisierung 22. Mai 2020. Geschichte
Joseph Addison Foto
Joseph Addison6
englischer Dichter, Politiker und Journalist 1672 - 1719

Ähnliche Zitate

Henry Taylor Foto
Maimónides Foto
Rutherford B. Hayes Foto
Niccolo Machiavelli Foto

„It is the nature of men to be bound by the benefits they confer as much as by those they receive.“

—  Niccolo Machiavelli, buch Der Fürst

La natura degli uomini è, così obligarsi per li beneficii che essi fanno, come per quelli che essi ricevono.
Quelle: The Prince (1513), Ch. 10

Henri Barbusse Foto

„Ah, there are cloudy moments when one asks himself if men do not deserve all the disasters into which they rush! No — I recover myself — they do not deserve them. But we, instead of saying "I wish" must say "I will."“

—  Henri Barbusse French novelist 1873 - 1935

And what we will, we must will to build it, with order, with method, beginning at the beginning, when once we have been as far as that beginning. We must not only open our eyes, but our arms, our wings.
Light (1919), Ch, XXI - No!

André-Marie Ampère Foto

„Listen to learned men, but do so only with one ear!… Let the other be always ready to receive the sweet accents of the voice of your heavenly Friend!“

—  André-Marie Ampère French physicist and mathematician 1775 - 1836

Écoute les savants, mais ne les écoute que d'une oreille!... Que l'autre soit toujours prête à recevoir les doux accents de la voix de ton ami céleste!
Ampère's Meditation, September 1805

Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay Foto
Mary Wollstonecraft Foto
W. Somerset Maugham Foto
Wilhelm Von Humboldt Foto
Robert Baden-Powell Foto
Hans Urs Von Balthasar Foto
Scott Adams Foto
Leonard Cohen Foto

„Although only one man may be receiving the favors of a woman, all men in her presence are warmed.“

—  Leonard Cohen Canadian poet and singer-songwriter 1934 - 2016

Spoken in "Ladies and Gentlemen, Leonard Cohen" (1965)
Kontext: Although only one man may be receiving the favors of a woman, all men in her presence are warmed. That's the great Generosity of women and the great generosity of the Creator who worked it out is that there are no unilateral agreements on sexuality.

François de La Rochefoucauld Foto

„The gratitude of most men is but a secret desire to receive even greater benefits.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld, buch Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims

La reconnaissance de la plupart des hommes n'est qu'une secrète envie de recevoir de plus grands bienfaits.
Variant translation: Gratitude is the lively expectation of favours yet to come.
Maxim 298. Compare: "The gratitude of place-expectants is a lively sense of future favours", attributed to Sir Robert Walpole.
Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims (1665–1678)

Robert Browning Foto
Diana Gabaldon Foto

„The praise of free men is worth having, for it is the only praise which is free from either servility or condescension.“

—  Bernard Crick British political theorist and democratic socialist 1929 - 2008

Quelle: In Defence Of Politics (Second Edition) – 1981, Chapter 7, In Praise Of Politics, p. 140.

Henry Adams Foto
Bram Stoker Foto

„Do you not think that there are things which you cannot understand, and yet which are, that some people see things that others cannot? But there are things old and new which must not be contemplated by men's eyes, because they know, or think they know, some things which other men have told them.“

—  Bram Stoker, buch Dracula

Professor Van Helsing to Dr. Seward
Dracula (1897)
Kontext: You reason well, and your wit is bold, but you are too prejudiced. You do not let your eyes see nor your ears hear, and that which is outside your daily life is not of account to you. Do you not think that there are things which you cannot understand, and yet which are, that some people see things that others cannot? But there are things old and new which must not be contemplated by men's eyes, because they know, or think they know, some things which other men have told them. Ah, it is the fault of our science that it wants to explain all, and if it explain not, then it says there is nothing to explain. But yet we see around us every day the growth of new beliefs, which think themselves new, and which are yet but the old, which pretend to be young, like the fine ladies at the opera.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“