„For though the poet's matter nature be,
His art doth give the fashion. And that he
Who casts to write a living line, must sweat“

—  Ben Jonson, Context: Yet must I not give nature all: thy art, My gentle Shakspeare, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion. And that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, (Such as thine arc) and strike the second heat Upon the muses anvil; turn the fame, And himself with it, that he thinks to frame; Or for the laurel, he may gain a scorn, For a good poet's made, as well as born. And such wert thou. Look how the father's face Lives in his issue, even so the race Of Shakspeare's mind and manners brightly shines In his well-turned, and true filed lines: In each of which he seems to shake a lance, As brandish'd at the eyes of ignorance. Lines 55 - 70
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Ben Jonson1
englischer Bühnenautor und Dichter 1572 - 1637
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„Thou art a monument, without a tomb,
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„The Poet in his Art
Must intimate the whole, and say the smallest part.“

—  William Wetmore Story American sculptor, art critic, poet, translator and editor 1819 - 1895
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„Some great poet or philosopher once said that " he who goes to nature for comfort must go to her empty handed ", and I think he was right.“

—  Flora Thompson English author and poet 1876 - 1947
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„Man tries to make for himself in the fashion that suits him best a simplified and intelligible picture of the world; he then tries to some extent to substitute this cosmos of his for the world of experience, and thus to overcome it. This is what the painter, the poet, the speculative philosopher, and the natural scientist do, each in his own fashion.“

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„Art is the sanctification of the nature, of that nature found in everyone who is content to live.“

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