„For though the poet's matter nature be,
His art doth give the fashion. And that he
Who casts to write a living line, must sweat“

—  Ben Jonson, Context: Yet must I not give nature all: thy art, My gentle Shakspeare, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion. And that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, (Such as thine arc) and strike the second heat Upon the muses anvil; turn the fame, And himself with it, that he thinks to frame; Or for the laurel, he may gain a scorn, For a good poet's made, as well as born. And such wert thou. Look how the father's face Lives in his issue, even so the race Of Shakspeare's mind and manners brightly shines In his well-turned, and true filed lines: In each of which he seems to shake a lance, As brandish'd at the eyes of ignorance. Lines 55 - 70
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Ben Jonson1
englischer Bühnenautor und Dichter 1572 - 1637
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„He who writes poetry is not a poet. He whose poetry has become his life, and who has made his life his poetry — it is he who is a poet.“

—  Subramanya Bharathi Tamil poet 1882 - 1921
English translation originally from "Subramaniya Bharathi" at Tamilnation.org<!-- closed site -->, also quoted in "Colliding worlds of tradition and revolution" in The Hindu (13 December 2009) http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/colliding-worlds-of-tradition-and-revolution/article662079.ece

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„Well doth he live who lives retired, and keeps
His wants within the limit of his means.“

—  Ovid Roman poet -43 - 17 v.Chr
Variant translation: Believe me that he who has passed his time in retirement, has lived to a good end, and it behoves every man to live within his means III, iv, 26

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„To live outside the law, you must be honest.“

—  Bob Dylan, da Absolutely Sweet Marie, n.° 11

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„Thou art a monument, without a tomb,
And art alive still, while thy book doth live,
And we have wits to read, and praise to give.“

—  Ben Jonson English writer 1572 - 1637
Context: Soul of the age! The applause, delight, the wonder of our stage! My Shakespeare, rise; I will not lodge thee by Chaucer or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further, to make thee a room; Thou art a monument, without a tomb, And art alive still, while thy book doth live, And we have wits to read, and praise to give. Lines 17 - 24; this was inspired by a eulogy by William Basse, On Shakespeare:

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„The Poet in his Art
Must intimate the whole, and say the smallest part.“

—  William Wetmore Story American sculptor, art critic, poet, translator and editor 1819 - 1895
The Unexpressed.

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„A musician must make music, an artist must paint, a poet must write, if he is to be ultimately at peace with himself. What a man can be, he must be.“

—  Abraham Maslow American psychologist 1908 - 1970
Context: A musician must make music, an artist must paint, a poet must write, if he is to be ultimately at peace with himself. What a man can be, he must be. This need we may call self-actualization. This term, first coined by Kurt Goldstein, is being used in this paper in a much more specific and limited fashion. It refers to the desire for self-fulfillment, namely, to the tendency for him to become actualized in what he is potentially. This tendency might be phrased as the desire to become more and more what one is, to become everything that one is capable of becoming. p. 93.

„The seventeenth-century academic separation between fine and useful arts first fell out of fashion nearly a century ago.“

—  George Kubler American art historian 1912 - 1996
George Kubler (1961), cited in: Guido Guerzoni (2011). Apollo and Vulcan: The Art Markets in Italy, 1400-1700. p. 27

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