„Geology… possesses the great advantage of presenting subjects adapted to every capacity“

The Medals of Creation or First Lessons in Geology (1854)
Kontext: Geology... possesses the great advantage of presenting subjects adapted to every capacity; on some of its investigations the highest intellectual powers and the most profound acquirements in exact science are required; while many of its problems may be solved by any one who has eyes and will use them; and innumerable facts illustrative of the ancient condition of our planet, and of its inhabitants, may be gathered by any diligent and intelligent observer.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 22. Mai 2020. Geschichte
Gideon Mantell Foto
Gideon Mantell
englischer Arzt, Geologe und Paläontologe 1790 - 1852

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Paul Tillich Foto

„Every finite thing possesses a certain power of being of its own and thus possesses a capacity for fate.“

—  Paul Tillich German-American theologian and philosopher 1886 - 1965

"Philosophy and Fate"
The Protestant Era (1948)
Kontext: The union of kairos and logos is the philosophical task set for us in philosophy and in all fields that are accessible to the philosophical attitude. The logos is to be taken up into the kairos, universal values into the fullness of time, truth into the fate of existence. The separation of idea and existence has to be brought to an end. It is the very nature of essence to come into existence, to enter into time and fate. This happens to essence not because of something extraneous to it; it is rather the expression of its own intrinsic character, of its freedom. And it is essential to philosophy to stand in existence, to create out of time and fate. It would be wrong if one were to characterize this as a knowledge bound to necessity. Since existence itself stands in fate, it is proper that philosophy should also stand in fate. Existence and knowledge both are subject to fate. The immutable and eternal heaven of truth of which Plato speaks is accessible only to a knowledge that is free from fate—to divine knowledge. The truth that stands in fate is accessible to him who stands within fate, who is himself an element of fate, for thought is a part of existence. And not only is existence fate to thought, but so also is thought fate to existence, just as everything is fate to everything else. Thought is one of the powers of being, it is a power within existence. And it proves its power by being able to spring out of any given existential situation and create something new! It can leap over existence just as existence can leap over it. Because of this characteristic of thought, the view perhaps quite naturally arose that thought may be detached from existence and may therefore liberate man from his hateful bondage to it. But the history of philosophy itself has shown that this opinion is a mistaken one. The leap of thought does not involve a breaking of the ties with existence; even in the act of its greatest freedom, thought remains bound to fate. Thus the history of philosophy shows that all existence stands in fate. Every finite thing possesses a certain power of being of its own and thus possesses a capacity for fate. The greater a finite thing’s autonomous power of being is, the higher is its capacity for fate and the more deeply is the knowledge of it involved in fate. From physics on up to the normative cultural sciences there is a gradation, the logos standing at the one end and the kairos at the other. But there is no point at which either logos or kairos alone is to be found. Hence even our knowledge of the fateful character of philosophy must at the same time stand in logos and in kairos. If it stood only in the kairos, it would be without validity and the assertion would be valid only for the one making it; if it stood only in the logos, it would be without fate and would therefore have no part in existence, for existence is involved in fate.

James Clerk Maxwell Foto
Šantidéva Foto
Hermann Weyl Foto

„It was my wish to present this great subject as an illustration of the itermingling of philosophical, mathematical, and physical thought“

—  Hermann Weyl German mathematician 1885 - 1955

From the Author's Preface to First Edition (1918)
Space—Time—Matter (1952)
Kontext: It was my wish to present this great subject as an illustration of the itermingling of philosophical, mathematical, and physical thought, a study which is dear to my heart. This could be done only by building up the theory systematically from the foundations, and by restricting attention throughout to the principles. But I have not been able to satisfy these self-imposed requirements: the mathematician predominates at the expense of the philosopher.

Benjamin Franklin Foto

„Human Felicity is produc'd not so much by great Pieces of good Fortune that seldom happen, as by little Advantages that occur every Day.“

—  Benjamin Franklin American author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, inventor, civic activist, statesman, a… 1706 - 1790

Part III, p. 108.
The Autobiography (1818)

Abraham Lincoln Foto

„That portion of the earth's surface which is owned and inhabited by the people of the United States is well adapted to be the home of one national family, and it is not well adapted for two or more. Its vast extent and its variety of climate and productions are of advantage in this age for“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

1860s, Second State of the Union address (1862)
Kontext: That portion of the earth's surface which is owned and inhabited by the people of the United States is well adapted to be the home of one national family, and it is not well adapted for two or more. Its vast extent and its variety of climate and productions are of advantage in this age for one people, whatever they might have been in former ages. Steam, telegraphs, and intelligence have brought these to be an advantageous combination for one united people.

„Pay attention to your students. Hear what they say, try to find out what their capacities are, what make sense to them. Adapt what you are doing and saying to those capacities, but make your students stretch upward.“

—  M. H. Abrams American literary theorist 1912 - 2015

People's Education interview (2007)
Kontext: Pay attention to your students. Hear what they say, try to find out what their capacities are, what make sense to them. Adapt what you are doing and saying to those capacities, but make your students stretch upward. I think the trick is to adapt to the level of a student, but never rest on that level — always make them reach out. … If a student does not quite get it the first time, he or she will come back and get it later. If you don’t set your writing — and teaching — at a level that makes them stretch, they are never going to develop their intellectual muscle.

Joseph Addison Foto
William Lloyd Garrison Foto
Susan Sontag Foto
Robert Benchley Foto
Johan Cruyff Foto

„Every disadvantage has its advantage.“

—  Johan Cruyff Dutch association football player 1947 - 2016

In They said It: Johan Cruyff ( FIFA.com, 25 April 2014 http://www.fifa.com/news/y=2014/m=4/news=they-said-it-johan-cruyff-2323958.html).

„Cultural elites in countries that dominate peoples have adapted subject people’s religion for their own purposes.“

—  Richard A. Horsley Biblical scholar 1939

Quelle: Religion and Empire: People, Power, and the Life of the Spirit (2003), p. 12

Augusto Boal Foto

„In its most archaic sense, theatre is the capacity possessed by human beings—and not by animals—to observe themselves in action.“

—  Augusto Boal Brazilian writer 1931 - 2009

Games for Actors and non-Actors (1992)
Kontext: In its most archaic sense, theatre is the capacity possessed by human beings—and not by animals—to observe themselves in action. Humans are capable of seeing themselves in the act of seeing, of thinking their emotions, of being moved by their thoughts. They can see themselves here and imagine themselves there; they can see themselves today and imagine themselves tomorrow. This is why humans are able to identify (themselves and others) and not merely to recognise.

E. W. Hobson Foto

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