„Wherefore governments rather depend upon men, than men upon governments. Let men be good, and the government cannot be bad; if it be ill, they will cure it. But, if men be bad, let the government be never so good, they will endeavor to warp and spoil it to their turn.“

Frame of Government (1682)
Kontext: Governments, like clocks, go from the motion men give them; and as governments are made and moved by men, so by them they are ruined too. Wherefore governments rather depend upon men, than men upon governments. Let men be good, and the government cannot be bad; if it be ill, they will cure it. But, if men be bad, let the government be never so good, they will endeavor to warp and spoil it to their turn.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
William Penn Foto
William Penn5
gründete die Kolonie Pennsylvania 1644 - 1718

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Robert LeFevre Foto

„If you have a government of good laws and bad men, you will have a bad government. For bad men will not be bound by good laws.“

—  Robert LeFevre American libertarian businessman 1911 - 1986

Colorado Springs Gazette-Telegraph, “Unlimited Government” (Dec. 29, 1961).

Charles Bukowski Foto

„Are there good governments and bad governments? No, there are only bad governments and worse governments.“

—  Charles Bukowski American writer 1920 - 1994

Quelle: The Most Beautiful Woman in Town & Other Stories

Thomas Jefferson Foto

„No government can be maintained without the principle of fear as well as of duty. Good men will obey the last, but bad ones the former only.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826

Letter to John Wayles Eppes (9 September 1814). Published in The Works of Thomas Jefferson in Twelve Volumes http://oll.libertyfund.org/ToC/0054.php, Federal Edition, Paul Leicester Ford, ed., New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1904, Vol. 11 http://files.libertyfund.org/files/807/0054-11_Bk.pdf, pp. 425-426
1810s
Kontext: [... ] Congress itself can punish Alexandria, by repealing the law which made it a town, by discontinuing it as a port of entry or clearance, and perhaps by suppressing it’s banks. But I expect all will go off with impunity. If our government ever fails, it will be from this weakness. No government can be maintained without the principle of fear as well as of duty. Good men will obey the last, but bad ones the former only.

Robert LeFevre Foto

„If men were basically good, we would not require government; if men were basically evil, we could not afford to grant any man the power of government.“

—  Robert LeFevre American libertarian businessman 1911 - 1986

Rampart Institute, p. 431
The Fundamental of Liberty (1988)

Daniel Webster Foto

„There are men in all ages who mean to govern well, but they mean to govern. They promise to be good masters, but they mean to be masters“

—  Daniel Webster Leading American senator and statesman. January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852. Served as the Secretary of State for three… 1782 - 1852

A speech delivered at Niblo’s Saloon, in New York, on the 15 of March, 1837.
The Works of Daniel Webster, Boston, Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1851, vol. 1, p. 358 http://books.google.com/books?id=9DMOAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA358&lpg=PA358&dq=%22They+mean+to+govern+well%3B+but+they+mean+to+govern%22&source=bl&ots=oJ6IWDhF2B&sig=iYuDQMQjnHzxMjzbd6rJohrXVrQ&hl=en&ei=xqYqTKDpFML-nAeF2omjAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CCwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=%22They%20mean%20to%20govern%20well%3B%20but%20they%20mean%20to%20govern%22&f=false.
Kontext: There are men, in all ages, who mean to exercise power usefully; but who mean to exercise it. They mean to govern well; but they mean to govern. They promise to be kind masters; but they mean to be masters.

Robert LeFevre Foto

„If men are good, you don’t need government; if men are evil or ambivalent, you don’t dare have one.“

—  Robert LeFevre American libertarian businessman 1911 - 1986

As quoted in Facets of Liberty: A Libertarian Primer, L.K. Samuels, editor, Freeland Press and Rampart Institute, Santa Ana: CA, Chap. 5, p. 70

Henry Fielding Foto

„It is much easier to make good men wise, than to make bad men good.“

—  Henry Fielding, buch The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling

Quelle: The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling

Alexander Hamilton Foto

„Men are rather reasoning than reasonable animals, for the most part governed by the impulse of passion.“

—  Alexander Hamilton Founding Father of the United States 1757 - 1804

Letter (16 April 1802)

Samuel Taylor Coleridge Foto
George Raymond Richard Martin Foto
Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. Foto

„Men must turn square corners when they deal with the Government.“

—  Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. United States Supreme Court justice 1841 - 1935

Rock Island C.R.R. v. United States, 254 U.S. 141, 143 (22 November 1920).
1920s

John Adams Foto

„A government of laws, and not of men.“

—  John Adams 2nd President of the United States 1735 - 1826

No. 7; this was incorporated into the Massachusetts Constitution in 1780
1770s, Novanglus essays (1774–1775)

Jean Jacques Rousseau Foto

„If there were a nation of Gods, it would govern itself democratically. A government so perfect is not suited to men.“

—  Jean Jacques Rousseau, buch Vom Gesellschaftsvertrag oder Prinzipien des Staatsrechtes

Quelle: The Social Contract

George Washington Foto

„The marvel of all history is the patience with which men and women submit to burdens unnecessarily laid upon them by their governments.“

—  George Washington first President of the United States 1732 - 1799

US Senator William Edgar Borah, writing in The Reader's Digest, Vol. 8, Issue 2 (1929), p. 776; this has only rarely begun to be attributed to Washington, since about 2010.
Misattributed

Cormac McCarthy Foto
Will Cuppy Foto

„[Footnote] Carthage was governed by its rich men and was therefore a plutocracy. Rome was also governed by its rich men and was therefore a republic.“

—  Will Cuppy American writer 1884 - 1949

The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody (1950), Part II: Ancient Greeks and Worse, Hannibal

Charles Dupin Foto

„The successes obtained in the government of the arts, are similar to the successes obtained in the government of men.“

—  Charles Dupin French mathematician 1784 - 1873

Quelle: The Commercial Power of Great Britain, 1925, p. xxxi ; Highlighted section cited in: Joel Mokyr. The Enlightened Economy: Britain and the Industrial Revolution, 1700-1850. 2011. p. 237
Kontext: The successes obtained in the government of the arts, are similar to the successes obtained in the government of men. We may succeed for a time, by fraud, by surprise, by violence: we can succeed permanently only by means directly opposite. It is not alone the courage, the intelligence, the activity of the manufacturer and the merchant which maintain the superiority of the productions and the commerce of their country; it is far more their wisdom, their economy, above all their probity.

James Madison Foto

„In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself.“

—  James Madison, Federalist Papers

Federalist No. 51 (6 February 1788)
1780s, Federalist Papers (1787–1788)
Quelle: The Federalist Papers
Kontext: If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself. A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions.

Benjamin Disraeli Foto

„With words we govern men.“

—  Benjamin Disraeli British Conservative politician, writer, aristocrat and Prime Minister 1804 - 1881

Part 1, Chapter 21.
Books, Coningsby (1844), Contarini Fleming (1832)

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