„There were a lot of utopias in the nineteenth century, wonderful societies that we might possibly construct. Those went pretty much out of fashion after World War I.“

The Progressive interview (2010)
Kontext: There were a lot of utopias in the nineteenth century, wonderful societies that we might possibly construct. Those went pretty much out of fashion after World War I. And almost immediately one of the utopias that people were trying to construct, namely the Soviet Union, threw out a writer called Zamyatin who wrote a seminal book called We, which contains the seeds of Orwell and Huxley. Writers started doing dystopias after we saw the effects of trying to build utopias that required, unfortunately, the elimination of a lot of people before you could get to the perfect point, which never arrived. … I don’t believe in a perfect world. I don’t believe it’s achievable, and I believe the people who try to achieve it usually end up turning it into something like Cambodia or something very similar because purity tests set in. Are you ideologically pure enough to be allowed to live? Well, it turns out that very few people are, so you end up with a big powerful struggle and a mass killing scene.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Margaret Atwood Foto
Margaret Atwood20
kanadische Schriftstellerin 1939

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Terrell Owens Foto

„I've always been pretty much a quiet person. When I was little, I got picked on a lot. After I went through all that, I pretty much kept to myself.“

—  Terrell Owens former American football wide receiver 1973

Brian Murphy (January 8, 1999) "What A Great Catch 49ers Struck Gold By Picking Owens", The Press Democrat, p. C1.

Frank Gehry Foto
Aga Khan IV Foto
William Ewart Gladstone Foto

„Ideal perfection is not the true basis of English legislation. We look at the attainable; we look at the practicable; and we have too much of English sense to be drawn away by those sanguine delineations of what might possibly be attained in Utopia, from a path which promises to enable us to effect great good for the people of England.“

—  William Ewart Gladstone British Liberal politician and prime minister of the United Kingdom 1809 - 1898

Speech https://api.parliament.uk/historic-hansard/commons/1884/feb/28/motion-for-leave in the House of Commons (28 February 1884) during a debate on the Representation of the People Bill.
1880s

Niels Bohr Foto

„The objective world of nineteenth-century science was, as we know today, an ideal, limiting case, but not the whole reality.“

—  Niels Bohr Danish physicist 1885 - 1962

Remarks after the Solvay Conference (1927)
Kontext: I consider those developments in physics during the last decades which have shown how problematical such concepts as "objective" and "subjective" are, a great liberation of thought. The whole thing started with the theory of relativity. In the past, the statement that two events are simultaneous was considered an objective assertion, one that could be communicated quite simply and that was open to verification by any observer. Today we know that 'simultaneity' contains a subjective element, inasmuch as two events that appear simultaneous to an observer at rest are not necessarily simultaneous to an observer in motion. However, the relativistic description is also objective inasmuch as every observer can deduce by calculation what the other observer will perceive or has perceived. For all that, we have come a long way from the classical ideal of objective descriptions.
In quantum mechanics the departure from this ideal has been even more radical. We can still use the objectifying language of classical physics to make statements about observable facts. For instance, we can say that a photographic plate has been blackened, or that cloud droplets have formed. But we can say nothing about the atoms themselves. And what predictions we base on such findings depend on the way we pose our experimental question, and here the observer has freedom of choice. Naturally, it still makes no difference whether the observer is a man, an animal, or a piece of apparatus, but it is no longer possible to make predictions without reference to the observer or the means of observation. To that extent, every physical process may be said to have objective and subjective features. The objective world of nineteenth-century science was, as we know today, an ideal, limiting case, but not the whole reality. Admittedly, even in our future encounters with reality we shall have to distinguish between the objective and the subjective side, to make a division between the two. But the location of the separation may depend on the way things are looked at; to a certain extent it can be chosen at will. Hence I can quite understand why we cannot speak about the content of religion in an objectifying language. The fact that different religions try to express this content in quite distinct spiritual forms is no real objection. Perhaps we ought to look upon these different forms as complementary descriptions which, though they exclude one another, are needed to convey the rich possibilities flowing from man's relationship with the central order.

Terence McKenna Foto
John Derbyshire Foto
David Bowie Foto
Stendhal Foto

„The taste for freedom, the fashion and cult of happiness of the majority that the nineteenth century is infatuated with, was only a heresy in his eyes that would pass like others.“

—  Stendhal, buch The Charterhouse of Parma

Le goût de la liberté, la mode et le culte du bonheur du plus grand nombre, dont le XIXe siècle s'est entiché, n'étaient à ses yeux qu'une hérésie qui passera comme les autres.
Quelle: La Chartreuse de Parme (The Charterhouse of Parma) (1839), Ch. 7

Ian Hacking Foto
H. G. Wells Foto

„No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The War of the Worlds

Book I, Ch. 1: The Eve of the War
The War of the Worlds (1898)
Kontext: No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same... Yet, across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us.

Edward Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax Foto
Gertrude Stein Foto

„The nineteenth century believed in science but the twentieth century does not.“

—  Gertrude Stein American art collector and experimental writer of novels, poetry and plays 1874 - 1946

Wars I Have Seen (1945)

Amit Shah Foto
Samuel R. Delany Foto
Adrienne Rich Foto
Nikolai Berdyaev Foto
Nikola Tesla Foto
Amit Chaudhuri Foto

„… the Bengali was the Marwari of the early nineteenth century.“

—  Amit Chaudhuri contemporary Indian-English novelist 1962

Calcutta: Two Years in The City (2013)

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