„It is a remarkable fact in the history of science, that the more extended human knowledge has become, the more limited human power, in that respect, has constantly appeared.“

Introductory
A Treatise on Man and the Development of His Faculties (1842)
Kontext: It is a remarkable fact in the history of science, that the more extended human knowledge has become, the more limited human power, in that respect, has constantly appeared. This globe, of which man imagines the haughty possessor, becomes, in the eyes of astronomer, merely a grain of dust floating in immensity of space: an earthquake, a tempest, an inundation, may destroy in an instant an entire people, or ruin the labours of twenty ages.... But if each step in the career of science thus gradually diminishes his importance, his pride has a compensation in the greater idea of his intellectual power, by which he has been enabled to perceive those laws which seem to be, by their nature, placed for ever beyond his grasp.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Adolphe Quetelet Foto
Adolphe Quetelet
belgischer Astronom und Statistiker 1796 - 1874

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Dan Brown Foto
H. G. Wells Foto

„Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe…“

—  H. G. Wells, buch The Outline of History

Quelle: The Outline of History (1920), Ch. 41
Kontext: Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe... Yet, clumsily or smoothly, the world, it seems, progresses and will progress.

Thomas Robert Malthus Foto
Swami Vivekananda Foto
Albert Einstein Foto
Julie Taymor Foto

„The artist has the possibility to create a much larger landscape with puppetry. The human becomes more human in that sense.“

—  Julie Taymor American film and theatre director 1952

As quoted in "New York at Work; Puppeteer Creates Shows for Grown-Ups" by N. R. Kleinfield The New York Times (2 July 1991) http://www.nytimes.com/1991/07/02/nyregion/new-york-at-work-puppeteer-creates-shows-for-grown-ups.html
Kontext: We have a ways to go in understanding the power of puppetry … Our problem is for too long we have thought of puppets being for children. … The appeal of puppetry to me is it's much more freeing for an artist … Puppetry is a completely controllable means to attack your characters in every possible way. The artist has the possibility to create a much larger landscape with puppetry. The human becomes more human in that sense. Another of the great things about puppetry is the ability to transform.

„Man is constantly being assured that he has more power than ever before in history, but his daily experience is one of powerlessness. …“

—  Richard M. Weaver American scholar 1910 - 1963

Quelle: Ideas have Consequences (1948), p. 16.
Kontext: Man is constantly being assured that he has more power than ever before in history, but his daily experience is one of powerlessness. … If he is with a business organization, the odds are great that he has sacrificed every other kind of independence in return for that dubious one known as financial.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky Foto

„But it has always happened that the more I detest men individually the more ardent becomes my love for humanity.“

—  Fyodor Dostoyevsky Russian author 1821 - 1881

Book II, ch. 4 (trans. Constance Garnett)
The Elder Zossima, speaking to Mrs. Khoklakov
The Brothers Karamazov (1879–1880)
Kontext: "It's just the same story as a doctor once told me," observed the elder. "He was a man getting on in years, and undoubtedly clever. He spoke as frankly as you, though in jest, in bitter jest. 'I love humanity,' he said, 'but I wonder at myself. The more I love humanity in general, the less I love man in particular. In my dreams,' he said, 'I have often come to making enthusiastic schemes for the service of humanity, and perhaps I might actually have faced crucifixion if it had been suddenly necessary; and yet I am incapable of living in the same room with any one for two days together, as I know by experience. As soon as any one is near me, his personality disturbs my self-complacency and restricts my freedom. In twenty-four hours I begin to hate the best of men: one because he's too long over his dinner; another because he has a cold and keeps on blowing his nose. I become hostile to people the moment they come close to me. But it has always happened that the more I detest men individually the more ardent becomes my love for humanity.'"

Ali Khamenei Foto
Dean Karnazes Foto

„The human body has limitations; the human spirit is boundless.“

—  Dean Karnazes American distance runner 1962

Quelle: Ultramarathon Man: Confessions of an All-Night Runner

Daniel Webster Foto
F. Scott Fitzgerald Foto
Bono Foto

„Of science and the human heart, there is no limit.“

—  Bono Irish rock musician, singer of U2 1960

Lyrics, How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb (2004)

Michael Oakeshott Foto
Robert G. Ingersoll Foto

„We have now a science called astronomy. That science has done more to enlarge the horizon of human thought than all things else.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899

The trial of Charles B. Reynolds for blasphemy (1887)
Kontext: We have now a science called astronomy. That science has done more to enlarge the horizon of human thought than all things else. We now live in an infinite universe. We know that the sun is a million times larger than our earth, and we know that there are other great luminaries millions of times larger than our sun. We know that there are planets so far away that light, traveling at the rate of one hundred and eighty- five thousand miles a second, requires fifteen thousand years to reach this grain of sand, this tear, we call the earth -- and we now know that all the fields of space are sown thick with constellations. If that statute had been enforced, that science would not now be the property of the human mind. That science is contrary to the Bible, and for asserting the truth you become a criminal. For what sum of money, for what amount of wealth, would the world have the science of astronomy expunged from the brain of man? We learned the story of the stars in spite of that statute.

Thomas Robert Malthus Foto
Wilhelm Von Humboldt Foto

„If we would indicate an idea which, throughout the whole course of history, has ever more and more widely extended its empire, or which, more than any other, testifies to the much-contested and still more decidedly misunderstood perfectibility of the whole human race, it is that of establishing our common humanity — of striving to remove the barriers which prejudice and limited views of every kind have erected among men, and to treat all mankind, without reference to religion, nation, or color, as one fraternity, one great community, fitted for the attainment of one object, the unrestrained development of the physical powers.“

—  Wilhelm Von Humboldt German (Prussian) philosopher, government functionary, diplomat, and founder of the University of Berlin 1767 - 1835

Kosmos (1847)
Kontext: If we would indicate an idea which, throughout the whole course of history, has ever more and more widely extended its empire, or which, more than any other, testifies to the much-contested and still more decidedly misunderstood perfectibility of the whole human race, it is that of establishing our common humanity — of striving to remove the barriers which prejudice and limited views of every kind have erected among men, and to treat all mankind, without reference to religion, nation, or color, as one fraternity, one great community, fitted for the attainment of one object, the unrestrained development of the physical powers. This is the ultimate and highest aim of society, identical with the direction implanted by nature in the mind of man toward the indefinite extension of his existence. He regards the earth in all its limits, and the heavens as far as his eye can scan their bright and starry depths, as inwardly his own, given to him as the objects of his contemplation, and as a field for the development of his energies. Even the child longs to pass the hills or the seas which inclose his narrow home; yet, when his eager steps have borne him beyond those limits, he pines, like the plant, for his native soil; and it is by this touching and beautiful attribute of man — this longing for that which is unknown, and this fond remembrance of that which is lost — that he is spared from an exclusive attachment to the present. Thus deeply rooted in the innermost nature of man, and even enjoined upon him by his highest tendencies, the recognition of the bond of humanity becomes one of the noblest leading principles in the history of mankind.

Andy Kessler Foto
Glenn Greenwald Foto

„The history of human knowledge is nothing more than the realization that yesterday's pieties are actually shameful errors.“

—  Glenn Greenwald American journalist, lawyer and writer 1967

"France's censorship demands to Twitter are more dangerous than 'hate speech'" in The Guardian, 2 January 2013. http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jan/02/free-speech-twitter-france

John Steinbeck Foto

„Literature is as old as speech. It grew out of human need for it, and it has not changed except to become more needed.“

—  John Steinbeck American writer 1902 - 1968

Nobel Prize acceptance speech (1962)
Kontext: Literature was not promulgated by a pale and emasculated critical priesthood singing their litanies in empty churches — nor is it a game for the cloistered elect, the tinhorn mendicants of low calorie despair.
Literature is as old as speech. It grew out of human need for it, and it has not changed except to become more needed.
The skalds, the bards, the writers are not separate and exclusive. From the beginning, their functions, their duties, their responsibilities have been decreed by our species.

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