„There rise authors now and then, who seem proof against the mutability of language, because they have rooted themselves in the unchanging principles of human nature.“

—  Washington Irving, buch The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.

"The Mutabilities of Literature".
The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon (1819–1820)
Kontext: There rise authors now and then, who seem proof against the mutability of language, because they have rooted themselves in the unchanging principles of human nature. They are like gigantic trees that we sometimes see on the banks of a stream; which, by their vast and deep roots, penetrating through the mere surface, and laying hold on the very foundations of the earth, preserve the soil around them from being swept away by the ever-flowing current, and hold up many a neighboring plant, and perhaps worthless weed, to perpetuity.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Washington Irving Foto
Washington Irving7
amerikanischer Schriftsteller 1783 - 1859

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Joseph Addison Foto

„Mutability of temper and inconsistency with ourselves is the greatest weakness of human nature.“

—  Joseph Addison politician, writer and playwright 1672 - 1719

No. 162 (5 September 1711).
The Spectator (1711–1714)

Henry George Foto

„Stepping out of their proper sphere and arrogating to themselves an authority to which they have no claim, professed teachers of spiritual truths long presumed to deny the truths of the natural sciences. But now professed teachers of the natural sciences, stepping in turn out of their proper sphere and arrogating to themselves an authority to which they have no claim, presume to deny spiritual truths.“

—  Henry George American economist 1839 - 1897

Conclusion : The Moral of this Examination
A Perplexed Philosopher (1892)
Kontext: Stepping out of their proper sphere and arrogating to themselves an authority to which they have no claim, professed teachers of spiritual truths long presumed to deny the truths of the natural sciences. But now professed teachers of the natural sciences, stepping in turn out of their proper sphere and arrogating to themselves an authority to which they have no claim, presume to deny spiritual truths. And there are many, who having discarded an authority often perverted by the influence of dominant wrong, have in its place accepted another authority which in its blank materialism affords as efficient a means for stilling conscience and defending selfish greed as any perversion of religious truth.
Mr. Spencer is the foremost representative of this authority. Widely regarded as the scientific philosopher; eulogized by his admirers as the greatest of all philosophers — as the man who has cleared and illuminated the field of philosophy by bringing into it the exact methods of science — he carries to the common mind the weight of the marvelous scientific achievements of our time as applied to the most momentous of problems. The effect is to impress it with a vague belief that modern science has proved the idea of God to be an ignorant superstition and the hope of a future life a vain delusion.

William Paley Foto
Herbert Spencer Foto

„There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance — that principle is contempt prior to investigation.“

—  Herbert Spencer English philosopher, biologist, sociologist, and prominent classical liberal political theorist 1820 - 1903

Commonly attributed to Spencer, information provided in The Quote Verifier: Who Said What, Where, and When (2006) by Ralph Keyes and The Survival of a Fitting Quotation. (2005) by Michael StGeorge http://anonpress.org/spencer/, indicates the attribution may have originated with the book [w:The_Big_Book_(Alcoholics_Anonymous)|Alcoholics Anonymous]]. It was used exactly as written above in the personal stories section of the first edition in 1939 and in 'Appendix II: Spiritual Experience' of all subsequent editions.
: "Contempt prior to examination" was a phrase used by William Paley, the 18th-century English Christian apologist. In A View of the Evidences of Christianity (1794), he wrote:
::The infidelity of the Gentile world, and that more especially of men of rank and learning in it, is resolved into a principle which, in my judgment, will account for the inefficacy of any argument, or any evidence whatever, viz. contempt prior to examination.
:Paley's characterization of non-believers was later modified and used by other religious authors who uniformly attributed their words to Paley. In Anglo-Israel or, The British Nation: The lost Tribes of Israel (1879), Rev. William H. Poole may have been the first to render the quotation in its more familiar and enduring form:
::There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all argument, and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance. This principle is, contempt prior to examination.
:Various authors following Rev. Poole would offer new iterations of the quotation into the early decades of the 20th century. Most of these credited William Paley, but by the early 1930s the first obscure publications to falsely attribute this quote to Spencer emerged. Its usage for decades since as a maxim in Alcoholics Anonymous and the twelve-step recovery community has popularized its erroneous association with Herbert Spencer.
Misattributed

Ralph Waldo Emerson Foto

„Nature is a mutable cloud which is always and never the same.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

History
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919), Essays, First Series
Variante: Nature is a mutable cloud which is always and never the same.

Bertrand Russell Foto

„If human nature were unchangeable, as ignorant people still suppose it to be, the situation would indeed be hopeless.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

Quelle: 1920s, Sceptical Essays (1928), Ch. 17: Some Prospects: Cheerful and Otherwise

Adolf Hitler Foto
John Prescott Foto

„We now have a satisfactory solution not only to coalition forces, but also to the Iraqi authorities themselves.“

—  John Prescott Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1997–2007) 1938

As quoted in " Prescott triumphs on slippery slopes of syntax http://www.guardian.co.uk/guardianpolitics/story/0,3605,1235237,00.html" by Simon Hoggart (10 June 2004); Hansard http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200304/cmhansrd/vo040609/debtext/40609-03.htm#40609-03_sbhd3 rendered this as "we now have a satisfactory solution for not only coalition forces, but the Iraqi authorities".

Jimmy Carter Foto

„The unchanging principles of life predate modern times.“

—  Jimmy Carter American politician, 39th president of the United States (in office from 1977 to 1981) 1924

Post-Presidency, Nobel lecture (2002)
Kontext: The unchanging principles of life predate modern times. I worship Jesus Christ, whom we Christians consider to be the Prince of Peace. As a Jew, he taught us to cross religious boundaries, in service and in love. He repeatedly reached out and embraced Roman conquerors, other Gentiles, and even the more despised Samaritans.
Despite theological differences, all great religions share common commitments that define our ideal secular relationships. I am convinced that Christians, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus, Jews, and others can embrace each other in a common effort to alleviate human suffering and to espouse peace.
But the present era is a challenging and disturbing time for those whose lives are shaped by religious faith based on kindness toward each other. We have been reminded that cruel and inhuman acts can be derived from distorted theological beliefs, as suicide bombers take the lives of innocent human beings, draped falsely in the cloak of God's will. With horrible brutality, neighbors have massacred neighbors in Europe, Asia, and Africa.
In order for us human beings to commit ourselves personally to the inhumanity of war, we find it necessary first to dehumanize our opponents, which is in itself a violation of the beliefs of all religions. Once we characterize our adversaries as beyond the scope of God's mercy and grace, their lives lose all value. We deny personal responsibility when we plant landmines and, days or years later, a stranger to us — often a child – is crippled or killed. From a great distance, we launch bombs or missiles with almost total impunity, and never want to know the number or identity of the victims.

Henri Barbusse Foto

„All is madness. And there is no one who will dare to rise and say that all is not madness, and that the future does not so appear — as fatal and unchangeable as a memory.“

—  Henri Barbusse French novelist 1873 - 1935

Light (1919), Ch. XVI - De Profundis Clamavi
Kontext: All is madness. And there is no one who will dare to rise and say that all is not madness, and that the future does not so appear — as fatal and unchangeable as a memory.
But how many men will there be who will dare, in face of the universal deluge which will be at the end as it was in the beginning, to get up and cry "No!" who will pronounce the terrible and irrefutable issue: —
"No! The interests of the people and the interests of all their present overlords are not the same.

Baruch Spinoza Foto

„Nature offers nothing that can be called this man's rather than another's ; but, under nature, everything belongs to all — that is, they have authority to claim it for themselves.“

—  Baruch Spinoza Dutch philosopher 1632 - 1677

Quelle: Political Treatise (1677), Ch. 2, Of Natural Right
Kontext: Nature offers nothing that can be called this man's rather than another's; but, under nature, everything belongs to all — that is, they have authority to claim it for themselves. But, under dominion, where it is by common law determined what belongs to this man, and what to that, he is called just who has a constant will to render to every man his own, but he, unjust who strives, on the contrary, to make his own that which belongs to another.

„Human worlds are always awash in superstition, only a stubborn elite proof against it.“

—  Sheri S. Tepper American fiction writer 1929 - 2016

Quelle: The Margarets (2007), Chapter 34, “I Am M’urgi/On B’Yurngrad” (p. 306)

Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury Foto
Hans Morgenthau Foto

„Political realism believes that politics, like society in general, is governed by objective laws that have their roots in human nature.“

—  Hans Morgenthau, buch Politics Among Nations

Six Principles of Political Realism http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/morg6.htm, § 1.
Politics Among Nations (1948)
Kontext: Political realism believes that politics, like society in general, is governed by objective laws that have their roots in human nature. In order to improve society it is first necessary to understand the laws by which society lives. The operation of these laws being impervious to our preferences, men will challenge them only at the risk of failure.
Realism, believing as it does in the objectivity of the laws of politics, must also believe in the possibility of developing a rational theory that reflects, however imperfectly and one-sidedly, these objective laws. It believes also, then, in the possibility of distinguishing in politics between truth and opinion — between what is true objectively and rationally, supported by evidence and illuminated by reason, and what is only a subjective judgment, divorced from the facts as they are and informed by prejudice and wishful thinking.

Thomas Aquinas Foto
John Tyndall Foto

„To legislation… the Puritans resorted. Instead of guiding, they repressed, and thus pitted themselves against the unconquerable impulses of human nature. Believing that nature to be depraved, they felt themselves logically warranted in putting it in irons. But they failed; and their failure ought to be a warning to their successors.“

—  John Tyndall British scientist 1820 - 1893

New Fragments (1892)
Kontext: To legislation... the Puritans resorted. Instead of guiding, they repressed, and thus pitted themselves against the unconquerable impulses of human nature. Believing that nature to be depraved, they felt themselves logically warranted in putting it in irons. But they failed; and their failure ought to be a warning to their successors.<!--p.34

Richard Adams Foto
Johannes Kepler Foto
Saul Bellow Foto

„The principles of Western liberalism seem no longer to lend themselves to effective action. Deprived of the expressive power, we are awed by it, have a hunger for it, and are afraid of it.“

—  Saul Bellow Canadian-born American writer 1915 - 2005

"Literary Notes on Khrushchev" (1961), p. 36
It All Adds Up (1994)
Kontext: The principles of Western liberalism seem no longer to lend themselves to effective action. Deprived of the expressive power, we are awed by it, have a hunger for it, and are afraid of it. Thus we praise the gray dignity of our soft-spoken leaders, but in our hearts we are suckers for passionate outbursts, even when those passionate outbursts are hypocritical and falsely motivated.

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